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Advice needed on general maintenance

Old 12-25-21, 11:48 AM
  #26  
LostVagabond
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Thank you sir!
I intend to do just that. A few trail runs are certainly in order
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Old 12-25-21, 11:50 AM
  #27  
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Originally Posted by Inusuit View Post
Good advice here, and also from IceTee2. While the bike may not be "high end," it is in better shape than I assumed from the first post. I can do basic maintenance such as clean, lube or replace chain, adjust brakes and derailleurs, replace/patch tubes, etc. If I were planning an extended trip in a foreign country (I should be so lucky) on a newly acquired used bike, I would have a professional go through it completely.
Thank you for your response. You're right that the components are not particularly high-end as you put. These are humble beginnings and hopefully after putting in some leg work I will fork out for an upgrade. (Once I have the necessary experience)
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Old 12-25-21, 11:54 AM
  #28  
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Originally Posted by 70sSanO View Post
I’m a bearing person.

Even with new cup-cone hubs, I open them up, clean, re-grease (or in some cases actually apply grease), and adjust.

Cartridge is up to you, feel how smooth they are, and replace if needed.

I’d drop the fork and check the headset, and re-grease if applicable.

Check the bottom bracket for play or gritty.

Check pedals.

John
Hi John
thank you for taking the time to respond to my post.
I intend to check the headset and readjust. I am planning to install a cinq plug5 USB charger I'm just working out how to go about ( I think I need to put some kind of steering plug extender between the headset and headset topcap to install it) . So I think I'll do all this one go. Are you aware of any good instructional videos about headset maintenence?

kind regards

Matt
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Old 12-25-21, 11:57 AM
  #29  
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Originally Posted by CliffordK View Post
Is that a Kenda tire?

There are better tires, either with lower rolling resistance, or greater puncture resistance and longevity. It depends a bit on what kind of riding you're planning.

For now, keep grinding away on the current tires, then acquire a new set of tires to swap in a few weeks before the big trip (just long enough for a short break in period).
Hi Clifford
no, they are Schwalbe Marathon almotion 28' x 2.15. This is a quality tyre for touring. They may need replaced before my trip, however
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Old 12-25-21, 12:02 PM
  #30  
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Originally Posted by CliffordK View Post
If this is a lightly used 10 year old bike, then it may not need a lot other than chain lube, and checking it over.

Bearings could be sealed cartridge, and largely ignored if in good shape.

I have seen it written here not to go bonkers with a bunch of upgrades. So, say the bike has a Deore rear derailleur and Altus front derailleur. There are better derailleurs available, but those should be solid enough. Check the cables?

It is good to learn about truing wheels, spokes, etc. But, never anticipate a newbie to be a master wheelbuilder. It is easy for newbies to get lost once they start messing with spokes, and it may be best to leave them alone.

Knowing how to replace tires, tubes, etc, is always a valuable skill when on the road and away from help.
Hello again Cliff
The maintenance that you mentioned is precisely what I need to learn. Are you aware of any good educational videos that demonstrate the fundamentals of wheel truing?. I have a spoke tensioner tool and like you said it can be quite daunting for a newbie to attempt such things. Nevertheless, we all must start somewhere. In regards to the cables, can you offer any tips on checking the cables?
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Old 12-25-21, 12:11 PM
  #31  
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Originally Posted by cyccommute View Post
Yes, a ruler works just fine. So do chain checkers and they are much faster. They are also accurate enough.

My main problem with the “use a 12” rule” is that a 12 inch rule can measure 12” accurately. A 12” rule can’t measure 12 1/16” accurately. Even a tape measure or a longer rule have their own problems in that they are difficult to keep in place since they are just laid on the chain. There can be almost that 1/16” variance in placement. At least a chain checker measures the same distance each time.



That is mostly where my “too much maintenance” comment was aimed. People on these forums clean their chains weekly and many clean their drivetrains just as often. I have seen people at my local co-op who would do a complete tear down and rebuild of their bikes weekly if we gave them the time. There is simply no need for that kind of maintenance schedule.

I have ridden everyday for weeks at a time on tour through all kinds of weather and road conditions without doing a single bit of any kind of maintenance other than a bit of chain lubricant every 600 or 700 miles.



I agree on the chain cleaning tools. They are more messy than effective. However, I use solvent wax which is just as clean and just as effect as hot wax without the need for a Crock Pot. That 600 mile interval above? I relube with solvent wax and go on my way. I don’t have the space to carry the stuff for hot waxing nor do I have the fuel for it.



Since LostVagabond has to ask the question, LostVagabond probably shouldn’t be tearing down a bike and trying to put it back together. LostVagabond‘s lack of tools and experience would likely result in a bike that would need more work than less. If LostVagabond has access to a co-op or to some place that is teaching maintenance classes, perhaps taking the bike apart would make sense but trying to do the work needed for a complete rebuild with a multi tool and no experience would not be advised.



And there’s where that “too much maintenance” statement raises it’s head. Why replace cables if the bike functions properly? Even 10 year old cables on a lightly used bike that is as clean as LostVagabond‘s appears to be shouldn’t need replacement. Nor should the shifters need prophylactic lubrication. If the shifters have a problem or if the shifting is off, then do that kind of work. But if everything is working, don’t mess with it.
I see the point you're trying make here mate and I agree. I need to take baby steps before I leap headfirst into a complete overhaul. However, I would add that a little curiosity and motivation to learn never hurt anyone and I hope before long I will have a good knowledge of my bike
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Old 12-25-21, 12:12 PM
  #32  
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Originally Posted by curbtender View Post
If you are riding in wet conditions it doesn't hurt to spray off the bike before the crud sets up and toweling it down. I have an old rag that I put some spray lube on and run the chain through it. Every once in a while I use a spray wax to wipe down frame before a ride. Doesn't take long.
Rain and snow. After I clean my chain I'll be using wetlube on it come my eurotrip I may switch to some dry lube
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Old 12-25-21, 12:14 PM
  #33  
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Originally Posted by cyccommute View Post
.



And there’s where that “too much maintenance” statement raises it’s head. Why replace cables if the bike functions properly? Even 10 year old cables on a lightly used bike that is as clean as LostVagabond‘s appears to be shouldn’t need replacement. Nor should the shifters need prophylactic lubrication. If the shifters have a problem or if the shifting is off, then do that kind of work. But if everything is working, don’t mess with it.
I couldn't agree more. The brake pads seem to be a more pressing issue than the cables IMO
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Old 12-25-21, 12:35 PM
  #34  
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Originally Posted by LostVagabond View Post
Hi John
thank you for taking the time to respond to my post.
I intend to check the headset and readjust. I am planning to install a cinq plug5 USB charger I'm just working out how to go about ( I think I need to put some kind of steering plug extender between the headset and headset topcap to install it) . So I think I'll do all this one go. Are you aware of any good instructional videos about headset maintenence?

kind regards

Matt
Looks like it just replaces the old adjuster. I would think it came with an extended bolt.
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Old 12-25-21, 12:58 PM
  #35  
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As far as building, rebuilding wheels, replacing spokes, and truing wheels, there are numerous separate threads here.

If your current bike is reasonably good, then you might hunt for a cheap wheel or cheap bike at a thrift store to play around with.

Years ago my dad made a truing stand out of wood. Since then I've upgraded to a vintage professional grade stand. However, it has been pointed out that you can use a variety of things for a truing stand including using your bike upside-down (on something soft like carpeting).

You need something for a reference indicator. Some people use zip ties. I've held pens, or BIC Razors by hand.

There are a few tricks to learn when building. For example, the spoke crosses above the valve tend to be wide open (not true of all spokes).
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Old 12-25-21, 04:07 PM
  #36  
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Originally Posted by LostVagabond View Post
Hello again Cliff
The maintenance that you mentioned is precisely what I need to learn. Are you aware of any good educational videos that demonstrate the fundamentals of ...
A general spot for a lot of how-to instruction and videos is the Park Tool website. Doesn't cover 100% of everything, but it's got quite a lot to keep you busy for awhile. Including some guides to wheel building, truing, tensioning.

https://www.parktool.com/blog

https://www.parktool.com/blog/repair-help
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Old 12-29-21, 02:00 AM
  #37  
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Originally Posted by cyccommute View Post
Twelve and a half hours of work? How do you do 12.5 hours of work and not do a brake bleed, rear pivots, and shock overhaul? I am currently doing prep work on donated bikes at my co-op for 4 hours each week. In that 4 hours, I can often do 2 bikes which includes replacing parts as well as tuning wheels. And that includes finding the replacement parts. It also includes greasing those “greasy-turney thingies on the inside” of the wheels. We don’t get many bikes with hydraulic brakes nor with serviceable suspensions, but I’m fairly certain that I could do those inside of a 12.5 hour window.

Not too many bikes get "over-serviced" in my experience. ****, I can't even keep on top of MY bikes - and I have ZERO excuses! (It's the mechanic's car that's in the worst shape...!)
[/QUOTE]

Easily. That's how. I've been doing this for years, having worked at the retail and manufacturer level. Trained staff to assemble the Ti product. People know my expertise and pay me to do a job well. I don't hurry, but I don't slack either. I'm not under any time constraints. I'm looking out for my clients. Instead of just assuming a cassette needs to be replaced, I'll be sure it does. Cleaning bikes thoroughly is something many LBS cannot do. (In fact, the LBS I had to visit was telling a customer just that as I waited to purchase something.) I enjoy presenting my clients with a bike as clean as it was off the showroom floor. And when a crank bolt fails after chainring replacement on a test ride, it takes time to source another and replace it. Checking and evening spoke tension takes time. Pulling DT ratchets, cleaning & relubricating them takes time. If I failed to mention it originally, the client came to me after the LBS handed him a $1,500 repair bill without even looking at it. He came to me for an honest appraisal of the bike's needs. I proceeded to take care of anything that came up. Bottom headset sealed bearing packed with mud was just one of the many things I discovered during the repair.

Amazing that you would feel you could judge how much time a bike would take, knowing nothing about it. You must be clairvoyant!

And a ten year old bike will often have shifters with hardened, dried grease in the internals, preventing the ratchets from engaging properly. Yes, an old bike may have perfectly smooth cables. Or perhaps a quick lubricating of the cables would refresh it to like-new condition. But an old bike may just as well have fouled cable housing that needs replacement, where lube does nothing to improve the situation. A knowledgeable mechanic can determine which is the case. The OP may be completely unaware of the possibilities.
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Old 12-29-21, 10:18 AM
  #38  
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You definitely need full synthetic 5w-30 oil, your drivetrain is subject to huge stress and heat.Seriously, do a minimum research of bike lubes. Auto oil is nobody's choice unless mixed with mineral spirits.
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Old 12-29-21, 10:28 AM
  #39  
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Originally Posted by LostVagabond View Post
Thank you for respondign cycocommute. In regard to the chain, would you recommend a degrease and then relube and if so would this best be done off or on the bike?
I strip the factory lubricant from the chain before installation with mineral spirits then lube the chain on the bike. That’s the first and only time my chain gets “degreased”. I use White Lightning (or Rock ‘N’ Roll) and don’t need to degrease since it isn’t “grease”. Nor does the chain pick up dirt which is really the only reason you need to remove oil based lubricants. As a bonus, the rest of my drivetrain doesn’t need cleaning either. I spend nearly zero hours on bicycle maintenance…even when riding day after day for weeks at a time on bicycle tours.
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Old 12-29-21, 10:58 AM
  #40  
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Originally Posted by LV2TNDM View Post
Easily. That's how. I've been doing this for years, having worked at the retail and manufacturer level. Trained staff to assemble the Ti product. People know my expertise and pay me to do a job well. I don't hurry, but I don't slack either. I'm not under any time constraints. I'm looking out for my clients. Instead of just assuming a cassette needs to be replaced, I'll be sure it does. Cleaning bikes thoroughly is something many LBS cannot do. (In fact, the LBS I had to visit was telling a customer just that as I waited to purchase something.) I enjoy presenting my clients with a bike as clean as it was off the showroom floor. And when a crank bolt fails after chainring replacement on a test ride, it takes time to source another and replace it. Checking and evening spoke tension takes time. Pulling DT ratchets, cleaning & relubricating them takes time. If I failed to mention it originally, the client came to me after the LBS handed him a $1,500 repair bill without even looking at it. He came to me for an honest appraisal of the bike's needs. I proceeded to take care of anything that came up. Bottom headset sealed bearing packed with mud was just one of the many things I discovered during the repair.
Most people aren’t going to pay $1500 for a bicycle repair…especially one that doesn’t include brake bleed, shock, and pivot service. Most bike shops aren’t going to want to hand a customer a $1500 bill for repairs. I know there are expensive bikes out there that might be worth spending $1500 for repairs but most people are going to just replace the bike for that cost. Even for expensive bikes, $1500 goes a long way towards just buy new parts. Headset packed with mud? Replace the headset or at least replace the bearings.

Amazing that you would feel you could judge how much time a bike would take, knowing nothing about it. You must be clairvoyant!
Not clairvoyant…just experienced. I’ve worked on thousands of bikes and know how long it takes to do just about everything that needs to be done to a bike. I don’t clean them but I know a lot about how to get abused bikes back to working order in a 90 minute window.

I’ve personally built bikes from the frame up in less than 12.5 hours…including building a wheel set and driving 60 miles to pick up the frame as well as going to the shop to pick up spokes. Additionally, I took apart a bike for the parts on the build. I picked up the bike at 10 a.m., drove home, took apart the old bike, cleaned parts, assembled the new bike, decided the wheels wouldn’t work, ran to the shop (closer), picked up parts for the wheels, built them, and got the bike back out on the road before 5 p.m.

And a ten year old bike will often have shifters with hardened, dried grease in the internals, preventing the ratchets from engaging properly.
That was true 20 years ago but no longer. Shimano shifters from the 90s often had problems with lubrication but that problem was largely solved by the 2000s. I seldom run across 9 speed and greater shifters that need much work.
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Old 12-29-21, 11:25 AM
  #41  
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Originally Posted by shelbyfv View Post
You definitely need full synthetic 5w-30 oil, your drivetrain is subject to huge stress and heat.Seriously, do a minimum research of bike lubes. Auto oil is nobody's choice unless mixed with mineral spirits.
Actually that's what I use in my Sturmey Archer S5 hub.
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