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What tool to use for cutting cable housings?

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What tool to use for cutting cable housings?

Old 01-05-22, 09:04 PM
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Originally Posted by cxwrench
Damn you folks tend to overthink pretty much everything. 'Twistwelding'? Please. Dremel? Overkill.
A Dremel isn't overkill if you already own one. It saves having to buy a CN-10 or something similar.
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Old 01-05-22, 11:05 PM
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Originally Posted by SoSmellyAir
Park Tool CN-10. I would have bought the well-reviewed Pedro analog to save a few dollars, but it was out of stock when my RD cable snapped.
I've been using a Pedro's version for many years because that's what was available locally the day I needed it. It works fine. I have no idea if others would work better though.
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Old 01-06-22, 08:12 AM
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Originally Posted by Camilo
I've been using a Pedro's version for many years because that's what was available locally the day I needed it. It works fine. I have no idea if others would work better though.
Same here, the Pedro's just works.

Although on a cold, rainy day like this, I could spend a few minutes gazing at a Felco's cutter if I had one, just because.
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Old 01-07-22, 08:56 AM
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Originally Posted by dedhed
Felco C7
+100, you will not regret buying the best.
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Old 01-07-22, 09:10 AM
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Originally Posted by Jeff Neese
I hear people talking about soldering the ends or in this case welding them, but why go through all that when all you need is a cable end cap that costs virtually nothing, and a pair of needle-nose pliers?
But think of all the weight you're saving!
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Old 01-07-22, 09:49 AM
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Originally Posted by Jeff Neese
I hear people talking about soldering the ends or in this case welding them, but why go through all that when all you need is a cable end cap that costs virtually nothing, and a pair of needle-nose pliers? It takes much less time (about two seconds), it gives the cable a more finished look, and the cable end won't poke you when you're cleaning the bike. It seems like welding cable ends is the proverbial "Ten dollar solution to a one dollar problem." But that's just me.
You are correct, we each have a right to our personal preferences. Next to my maintenance stand hangs a flex shaft Dremel and I get perfect square cuts in brake housings in seconds. About three feet away is my Lincoln wire feed that I have to throw the switch and touch the cable with the gun resulting in a perfect finish that never frays and takes as much time as getting a cutter from the tool drawer.
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Old 01-07-22, 05:11 PM
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Originally Posted by jnbrown
The problem with tools like the Park CN-10 is when used on brake cable housing is they crush the spiral wound metal housing.
...
That's what I use my leftover cable for! The CN-10 is sharp enough to cut through a housing with a cable in it. Before cutting the housing, feed a strand of scrap cable through it, just past the point you want to cut. Then use the CN-10 to cut through it. The cable will keep the braided housing from collapsing on itself.
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Old 01-07-22, 05:21 PM
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Originally Posted by Papa Tom
That's what I use my leftover cable for! The CN-10 is sharp enough to cut through a housing with a cable in it. Before cutting the housing, feed a strand of scrap cable through it, just past the point you want to cut. Then use the CN-10 to cut through it. The cable will keep the braided housing from collapsing on itself.
that thought occurred to me also, its nice to know that will work. On the park description of the tool it says it makes perfect cuts with no collapsing. I will test it and report back to this thread my findings. Then I will decide to keep it or send it back.
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Old 01-07-22, 11:57 PM
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Originally Posted by BikePower
.... Also need the ferules for the housing ends but not the cable end caps because Im going to use the twist welding method.
The housing end caps are available. For example, these are for brake (5mm) housing: https://cambriabike.com/products/jag...16457543090250
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Old 01-08-22, 10:23 AM
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Originally Posted by MudPie
The housing end caps are available. For example, these are for brake (5mm) housing: https://cambriabike.com/products/jag...16457543090250
Thats a nice link Mud. Thanks for that. They have everything there!
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Old 01-08-22, 11:30 AM
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Dremel tool. Use scrap cable inside the housing. Dip the cut ends in JB Weld.
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Old 01-08-22, 02:15 PM
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Originally Posted by cranky old road
Dremel tool. Use scrap cable inside the housing. Dip the cut ends in JB Weld.
JB weld. Thats a good idea.

1. crimp a cap on the wire pros: fast, cheap, easy. looks finished cons: have to cut it off if you want to remove the cable from the caliper and or housing, have to leave a long tail if you want to work on the brakes without cutting the cap off and having to put a new one on. sometimes caps fall off. not a big deal for most people.

2. twist weld pros: permanently fused, can be removed from the caliper for servicing or wheel removal. better appearance since not tail is needed for future adjustments or service. cons: looks unfinished to some without a cap, need torch, variable speed drill, some skill, potentially dangerous open flame, explosive gas.

3. wire weld pros: permanent, fast, cons: grinding the tip likely if you want it to be removeable. questionable appearance without additional work. need a mig welder and shielding gas and skill

4. jb weld pros: same as twist weld without the risks. cons: requires a trip to the store to buy jb weld and time and mess to mix it up.

Did I forget anything?
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Old 01-08-22, 02:21 PM
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Whenever these cable/housing cutter threads come up, I'm always tempted to move from my DeWalt side cutters, especially for housings.

I've not been a big fan of the Park, Pedros, SRAM, Shimano tools that are generally cheaper copies of non-bike tools; i.e. Felco C7.

My understanding is that Felco has been pretty much the standard over the years, but I decided to go with Knipex 95-61-190.

They are made in Germany, have a built in crimping tool, and a little less money.

John
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Old 01-08-22, 03:26 PM
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Originally Posted by Crankycrank
+1. And twist welding to keep cable ends from fraying. You could even get away without cable cutters as Twist Welding does the cutting but the cutters are nice to have. Twist Welding Cable (How To) - YouTube
Hey Cranky I was wondering if this twist welding method will work on stainless steel and galvanized. Im looking for the Schwinn huret shifter cables and I would like to get them in stainless or whatever is best. I found some in galvanized from jagwire but I understand the stainless is the best. Would this work on galv and stainless?
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Old 01-08-22, 03:32 PM
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Originally Posted by MudPie
The housing end caps are available. For example, these are for brake (5mm) housing: https://cambriabike.com/products/jag...16457543090250
I cant find the 4mm ones for shifter cable. Do you know?
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Old 01-08-22, 04:03 PM
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Originally Posted by BikePower
Hey Cranky I was wondering if this twist welding method will work on stainless steel and galvanized. Im looking for the Schwinn huret shifter cables and I would like to get them in stainless or whatever is best. I found some in galvanized from jagwire but I understand the stainless is the best. Would this work on galv and stainless?
Yes, works on Stainless very well and I can't see any reason why it wouldn't work on galvanized but have never tried it myself. Try it on an excess piece of cable to be sure. A few tips. You can install the cable and clamp it to the derailleur and avoid using a vice or pliers. You'll know where to cut it without having to measure anything.and obviously watch where you aim the flame and make sure the drill is twisting in the right direction, I never used paint on the finished cable end like the video shows as it's not necessary really, Quick and easy.
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Old 01-08-22, 06:49 PM
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Originally Posted by BikePower
I cant find the 4mm ones for shifter cable. Do you know?
Try here: https://wheelsmfg.com/products/cable...-ferrules.html
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Old 01-08-22, 07:14 PM
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Dremel cutting seems to offer the best result but I use a Park cable cutter. To get a cleaner cut I stuff a thick copper wire (10ga ?) into the housing before cutting...
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Old 01-08-22, 08:15 PM
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Originally Posted by RGMN
Good find. Are the housing ferrules reusable (for next time when I buy only the inner cables instead of the entire road shift cable set)?
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Old 01-08-22, 09:03 PM
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Originally Posted by SoSmellyAir
Good find. Are the housing ferrules reusable (for next time when I buy only the inner cables instead of the entire road shift cable set)?
Why would you only replace the cables and not the housing too?
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Old 01-08-22, 10:39 PM
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Originally Posted by cxwrench
Why would you only replace the cables and not the housing too?
Because (from what I have read) housing does not wear out as quickly as cables fray?

But you are right, I might as well (buy the whole set and) replace both cable and housing (and bar tape) at the same time.
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Old 01-08-22, 11:24 PM
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Originally Posted by shelbyfv
You can also use a Dremel with cutting wheel for housing. You may have to punch out the melted stuff with something pointy.
This!
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Old 01-09-22, 09:21 AM
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You can actually get a kit of precut cables for a 72 Schwinn Continental? Impressive!
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Old 01-09-22, 10:06 AM
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Originally Posted by SoSmellyAir
Because (from what I have read) housing does not wear out as quickly as cables fray?

But you are right, I might as well (buy the whole set and) replace both cable and housing (and bar tape) at the same time.
The liner in the housing is plastic, the cable is stainless steel. You tell me which will wear first. If it takes 2000miles for the shifter cable to fray inside the shifter the housing is worn.
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Old 01-09-22, 11:56 AM
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I’m not certain a housing liner wears all that quickly that it needs to be replaced when a cable is replaced because it is plastic.

There are plastic interfaces on a bike such as a linear brake noodle liner or the BB shell plastic cable guide that seem to last many years.

Housings do get old and gummed up, and I imagine some wear that impacts shifting performance, so replacing housings is important. And with additional cogs, it is probably more critical.

It will be interesting if the newer slick cables help with housing life.

John
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