Go Back  Bike Forums > Bike Forums > Bicycle Mechanics
Reload this Page >

Bike work stand advice

Notices
Bicycle Mechanics Broken bottom bracket? Tacoed wheel? If you're having problems with your bicycle, or just need help fixing a flat, drop in here for the latest on bicycle mechanics & bicycle maintenance.

Bike work stand advice

Old 01-06-22, 01:10 PM
  #1  
pbass
Senior Member
Thread Starter
 
Join Date: Sep 2012
Location: SoCal
Posts: 1,119

Bikes: 2016 Surly Cross Check singlespeed, 2019 Kona Rove ST

Mentioned: 5 Post(s)
Tagged: 0 Thread(s)
Quoted: 259 Post(s)
Liked 256 Times in 179 Posts
Bike work stand advice

I have some Jenson $$ to spend and was looking at this stand: https://www.jensonusa.com/Feedback-R...epair-Stand-20

My question is: this will be for my garage and learning to wrench on my bikes, not for travel as this thing is ideally intended for, so the portability factor isn't important to me. Is something like this gonna offer enough support for those times when you gotta muscle some component into submission? I'm used to watching the pros at my LBS work on their stands that are mounted to the floor!

Next level up would be this, which looks more stable, but still, not terribly much more: https://www.jensonusa.com/Feedback-S...nic-Work-Stand
pbass is offline  
Old 01-06-22, 01:23 PM
  #2  
Numerozero
Senior Member
 
Numerozero's Avatar
 
Join Date: Jan 2018
Location: Vancouver, eh
Posts: 107

Bikes: Downtube 8FH w/ TSD-Z2 motor; Xootr Swift w/DualDrive ; Downtube MiniB

Mentioned: 0 Post(s)
Tagged: 0 Thread(s)
Quoted: 45 Post(s)
Liked 34 Times in 15 Posts
Never owned the first one, but have owned the second. It's a great stand, I would get it. Very stable. Wirecutter rates it as a best buy.
Numerozero is offline  
Likes For Numerozero:
Old 01-06-22, 01:37 PM
  #3  
pbass
Senior Member
Thread Starter
 
Join Date: Sep 2012
Location: SoCal
Posts: 1,119

Bikes: 2016 Surly Cross Check singlespeed, 2019 Kona Rove ST

Mentioned: 5 Post(s)
Tagged: 0 Thread(s)
Quoted: 259 Post(s)
Liked 256 Times in 179 Posts
Originally Posted by Numerozero View Post
Never owned the first one, but have owned the second. It's a great stand, I would get it. Very stable. Wirecutter rates it as a best buy.
Good to hear--thanks!
pbass is offline  
Old 01-06-22, 01:58 PM
  #4  
sdmc530
Heft On Wheels
 
sdmc530's Avatar
 
Join Date: Nov 2014
Location: South Dakota
Posts: 3,124

Bikes: Specialized,Cannondale,Argon 18

Mentioned: 13 Post(s)
Tagged: 0 Thread(s)
Quoted: 886 Post(s)
Liked 560 Times in 346 Posts
I got two.. i have a race type work stand I use 80% of the time and I have one like the second one you have listed. However I got it at an ALDI's grocery store a few years back for $19. Best $19 dollars I have spent on a bike tool in a long while.

My go to is this one:

Workstand Race FC: Maintenance - Elite (elite-it.com)
I have this in a previous design but same concept. Just awesome!
sdmc530 is offline  
Old 01-06-22, 02:04 PM
  #5  
squirtdad
Senior Member
 
squirtdad's Avatar
 
Join Date: Jul 2006
Location: San Jose (Willow Glen) Ca
Posts: 8,657

Bikes: 85 team Miyata (modern 5800 105) , '84 Team Miyata,(dura ace old school) 80?? SR Semi-Pro 600 Arabesque

Mentioned: 91 Post(s)
Tagged: 0 Thread(s)
Quoted: 1782 Post(s)
Liked 1,486 Times in 904 Posts
A good workstand is the best investment in bike tools i have ever made

I am partial to the park https://www.jensonusa.com/Park-Tool-...c-Repair-Stand
__________________
Life is too short not to ride the best bike you have, as much as you can
(looking for Torpado Super light 56,57 or so)

squirtdad is offline  
Likes For squirtdad:
Old 01-06-22, 02:11 PM
  #6  
pbass
Senior Member
Thread Starter
 
Join Date: Sep 2012
Location: SoCal
Posts: 1,119

Bikes: 2016 Surly Cross Check singlespeed, 2019 Kona Rove ST

Mentioned: 5 Post(s)
Tagged: 0 Thread(s)
Quoted: 259 Post(s)
Liked 256 Times in 179 Posts
Originally Posted by squirtdad View Post
A good workstand is the best investment in bike tools i have ever made

I am partial to the park https://www.jensonusa.com/Park-Tool-...c-Repair-Stand
Yeah, I've been slowly acquiring tools but still wrestling with the bike with only one of those little stands that holds it up by the seat/chain stays on one side--far from ideal!
pbass is offline  
Old 01-06-22, 03:13 PM
  #7  
SoSmellyAir
Method to My Madness
 
Join Date: Nov 2020
Location: Orange County, California
Posts: 1,903

Bikes: Cannondale Synapse, Cannondale CAAD4, Trek FX 2

Mentioned: 3 Post(s)
Tagged: 0 Thread(s)
Quoted: 907 Post(s)
Liked 600 Times in 455 Posts
Originally Posted by pbass View Post
I have some Jenson $$ to spend and was looking at this stand: https://www.jensonusa.com/Feedback-R...epair-Stand-20

My question is: this will be for my garage and learning to wrench on my bikes, not for travel as this thing is ideally intended for, so the portability factor isn't important to me. Is something like this gonna offer enough support for those times when you gotta muscle some component into submission? I'm used to watching the pros at my LBS work on their stands that are mounted to the floor!

Next level up would be this, which looks more stable, but still, not terribly much more: https://www.jensonusa.com/Feedback-S...nic-Work-Stand
Do get the second one. You are right; tripod base is much more stable than bipod base, especially if your bike is heavier or if you are going to "muscle some components into submission."
SoSmellyAir is offline  
Old 01-06-22, 04:19 PM
  #8  
squirtdad
Senior Member
 
squirtdad's Avatar
 
Join Date: Jul 2006
Location: San Jose (Willow Glen) Ca
Posts: 8,657

Bikes: 85 team Miyata (modern 5800 105) , '84 Team Miyata,(dura ace old school) 80?? SR Semi-Pro 600 Arabesque

Mentioned: 91 Post(s)
Tagged: 0 Thread(s)
Quoted: 1782 Post(s)
Liked 1,486 Times in 904 Posts
Originally Posted by SoSmellyAir View Post
Do get the second one. You are right; tripod base is much more stable than bipod base, especially if your bike is heavier or if you are going to "muscle some components into submission."
the park with tripod is totally stable (heavy as heck also) ......and works better if you have a not perfectly flat floor (I take to outside bike charity fix it events)
__________________
Life is too short not to ride the best bike you have, as much as you can
(looking for Torpado Super light 56,57 or so)

squirtdad is offline  
Old 01-06-22, 04:30 PM
  #9  
caloso
Senior Member
 
caloso's Avatar
 
Join Date: Jul 2002
Location: Sacramento, California, USA
Posts: 40,774

Bikes: Specialized Tarmac, Canyon Exceed, Specialized Transition, Ellsworth Roots, Ridley Excalibur

Mentioned: 68 Post(s)
Tagged: 0 Thread(s)
Quoted: 2912 Post(s)
Liked 2,967 Times in 1,362 Posts
I have the second one. I use it all the time and it's excellent.
caloso is offline  
Old 01-06-22, 04:31 PM
  #10  
veganbikes
Clark W. Griswold
 
Join Date: Mar 2014
Location: ,location, location
Posts: 10,233

Bikes: Foundry Chilkoot Ti W/Ultegra Di2, Salsa Timberjack Ti, Cinelli Mash Work RandoCross Fun Time Machine, 1x9 XT Parts Hybrid, Co-Motion Cascadia, Specialized Langster, Phil Wood Apple VeloXS Frame (w/DA 7400), R+M Supercharger2 Rohloff, Habanero Ti 26

Mentioned: 42 Post(s)
Tagged: 0 Thread(s)
Quoted: 2990 Post(s)
Liked 2,213 Times in 1,464 Posts
I like my Park PRS.25 but the PCS-10.3 or 4.2 would be great options, the clamp they use on those stands is really nice and easy to use. If I am going to have a stand and learn I might as well spend a tiny bit extra and get something really useful. Basic stands are OK and will function but if I know I want to learn and become better at wrenching having a good stand will help greatly and the long term cost of ownership is pretty low because unless you really do something to it, it will last forever. I have an old version of the PCS 4.1 like really old that is fine but not as adjustable or easy to use so probably at some point I might sell or donate it but it is probably at least from the 90s and still going (I am at least second owner and it was used)

I really want to try the new Topeak eUP stand but I just got the PRS.25 so I don't really want to replace it but making it easier to get heavier bikes up and down would be nice as my back sucks.
veganbikes is offline  
Old 01-06-22, 04:40 PM
  #11  
70sSanO
Senior Member
 
70sSanO's Avatar
 
Join Date: Feb 2015
Location: Mission Viejo
Posts: 5,232

Bikes: 1986 Cannondale SR400 (Flat bar commuter), 1988 Cannondale Criterium XTR, 1992 Serotta T-Max, 1995 Trek 970

Mentioned: 19 Post(s)
Tagged: 0 Thread(s)
Quoted: 1722 Post(s)
Liked 1,805 Times in 1,119 Posts
I have a Feedback Ultralight, which is a shorter version of the Elite.

I have used it for over 5 years. The only issue was the arm pin broke, but I replaced it with a bolt and didn’t miss a beat.

It is not so stable that I can break loose, or torque a bottom bracket, without a wheel on the ground to absorb the torque. But other than a few instances, I can do any maintenance.

I would probably opt for the $180 Feedback stand. The Park is more substantial, and $100 more, but a lightweight quick setup stand gets used a lot more than one that is heavy to move around and setup. At least in my experience.

John
70sSanO is online now  
Likes For 70sSanO:
Old 01-06-22, 04:53 PM
  #12  
jnbrown
Senior Member
 
jnbrown's Avatar
 
Join Date: Nov 2006
Location: Encinitas, CA
Posts: 1,235
Mentioned: 0 Post(s)
Tagged: 0 Thread(s)
Quoted: 115 Post(s)
Liked 66 Times in 35 Posts
I have a very old stand that I think I got from performance.
It works like the Park with a clamp.
However I find the clamp to be useless because I am not going to clamp my frame and my seatpost does not stick out far enough for the clamp to fit.
So I end up slinging the saddle on top of the arm which in not stable at all.
Really like the idea of the Race FC referenced above as it clamps the fork and has a support for the BB.
This style will be my next stand.
This looks like a lower cost option that might be good:

https://www.amazon.com/Bikehand-Bicy...a-877401468646

Last edited by jnbrown; 01-06-22 at 05:08 PM.
jnbrown is offline  
Likes For jnbrown:
Old 01-06-22, 08:09 PM
  #13  
pbass
Senior Member
Thread Starter
 
Join Date: Sep 2012
Location: SoCal
Posts: 1,119

Bikes: 2016 Surly Cross Check singlespeed, 2019 Kona Rove ST

Mentioned: 5 Post(s)
Tagged: 0 Thread(s)
Quoted: 259 Post(s)
Liked 256 Times in 179 Posts
Originally Posted by jnbrown View Post
I have a very old stand that I think I got from performance.
It works like the Park with a clamp.
However I find the clamp to be useless because I am not going to clamp my frame and my seatpost does not stick out far enough for the clamp to fit.
So I end up slinging the saddle on top of the arm which in not stable at all.
Really like the idea of the Race FC referenced above as it clamps the fork and has a support for the BB.
This style will be my next stand.
This looks like a lower cost option that might be good:

https://www.amazon.com/Bikehand-Bicy...a-877401468646
Interesting points. On both my bikes I have setback seatposts, and not much seatpost showing. The clamp would invariably be on the bend in the seatpost, unless I pull the seatpost out more. Or, I clamp to the frame. Both my bikes are steel, so probably not an issue.
pbass is offline  
Old 01-06-22, 08:18 PM
  #14  
SoSmellyAir
Method to My Madness
 
Join Date: Nov 2020
Location: Orange County, California
Posts: 1,903

Bikes: Cannondale Synapse, Cannondale CAAD4, Trek FX 2

Mentioned: 3 Post(s)
Tagged: 0 Thread(s)
Quoted: 907 Post(s)
Liked 600 Times in 455 Posts
Originally Posted by 70sSanO View Post
I have a Feedback Ultralight, which is a shorter version of the Elite.

I have used it for over 5 years. The only issue was the arm pin broke, but I replaced it with a bolt and didn’t miss a beat.

It is not so stable that I can break loose, or torque a bottom bracket, without a wheel on the ground to absorb the torque. But other than a few instances, I can do any maintenance.
I have the same one and your observations are spot on.
SoSmellyAir is offline  
Old 01-06-22, 08:24 PM
  #15  
SoSmellyAir
Method to My Madness
 
Join Date: Nov 2020
Location: Orange County, California
Posts: 1,903

Bikes: Cannondale Synapse, Cannondale CAAD4, Trek FX 2

Mentioned: 3 Post(s)
Tagged: 0 Thread(s)
Quoted: 907 Post(s)
Liked 600 Times in 455 Posts
Originally Posted by squirtdad View Post
the park with tripod is totally stable (heavy as heck also) ......and works better if you have a not perfectly flat floor (I take to outside bike charity fix it events)
The folding mechanism of the Park stand you linked above is a bipod, i.e., only two, not three, folding legs; we have covered this before (Bike Forums - View Single Post - Bike Stand recommendation).
SoSmellyAir is offline  
Old 01-07-22, 06:45 AM
  #16  
TiHabanero
Senior Member
 
Join Date: Nov 2012
Posts: 3,854
Mentioned: 14 Post(s)
Tagged: 0 Thread(s)
Quoted: 1441 Post(s)
Liked 910 Times in 477 Posts
In the past I had a side hustle of assembling bikes for Sam's Club. I processed hundreds of bikes for builds and warranty work all held by a Park stand. Zero complaints. The bipod design works very well and the weight of the bike helps keep things stable. The stand is not so heavy that you can't haul it around, it is portable!
I have used the Feedback Sport stand. It is lighter, but I found myself having to be conscience of the legs when working on a bike. I also preferred the Park jaws, but the Feedback jaws work just fine. I do believe the extra couple of pounds of the Park stand aid stability when working on a bike.
My perspective comes from owning and using a Park double workshop stand and working in bike shops for nearly 40 years. I am accustomed to the good stuff and find the Park stand a fair compromise to get portability.
TiHabanero is offline  
Old 01-07-22, 07:33 AM
  #17  
JohnDThompson 
Old fart
 
JohnDThompson's Avatar
 
Join Date: Nov 2004
Location: Appleton WI
Posts: 23,755

Bikes: Several, mostly not name brands.

Mentioned: 142 Post(s)
Tagged: 0 Thread(s)
Quoted: 3052 Post(s)
Liked 2,181 Times in 1,302 Posts
Originally Posted by jnbrown View Post
I have a very old stand that I think I got from performance.
It works like the Park with a clamp.
However I find the clamp to be useless because I am not going to clamp my frame and my seatpost does not stick out far enough for the clamp to fit.
So I end up slinging the saddle on top of the arm which in not stable at all.
Get a cheap steel post in the proper diameter on which to clamp. Pull out the current saddle and post (mark insertion height first), inset cheap post, clamp on cheap post.

If you routinely work on a variety of bikes with different post diameters, consider the Park "internal seat clamp."
Attached Images
File Type: jpg
ISC-1_Parts-Diagram.jpg (48.7 KB, 244 views)
JohnDThompson is offline  
Old 01-07-22, 08:22 AM
  #18  
travbikeman
Senior Member
 
Join Date: Mar 2015
Posts: 1,639
Mentioned: 7 Post(s)
Tagged: 0 Thread(s)
Quoted: 403 Post(s)
Liked 138 Times in 100 Posts
I have essentially the second one you listed or at least similar, but has the Performance Bikes name on it from when the original Performance Bikes was in business. This was several years ago and I did not pay as much as your Feedback. Believe that Feedback was whom made the stand, but am not positive on that.

Some observations on these: They are not as stable as the Park Tool stands, even though it is a tripod. Even though it is fairly stable, you still have to be careful with this stand since there are times you can tip this over depending how high up you put the bike. The lower the bike is the more stable it becomes.

There are times where if you don't have the bike completely straight or if it moves around in stand while working on, when turning the pedals to adjust derailleurs, there could be a pedal strike against the stand.

Where as the Park Tools has a slant to the stand, where it makes the stand more stable and you won't have pedal strikes.

I've also found that turning the knob to secure the bike, while holding a heavier mountain bike in stand gets old after a while. The quick release or clamp of the Park Tool stand is a lot easier to use when hooking up the bike to the stand.

I'm actually looking into buying one of the Park Tool stands myself and may sell my Performance Bikes stand this coming spring.

Good Comparison:


Last edited by travbikeman; 01-07-22 at 10:52 AM.
travbikeman is offline  
Likes For travbikeman:
Old 01-07-22, 08:50 AM
  #19  
dsbrantjr
Senior Member
 
dsbrantjr's Avatar
 
Join Date: Sep 2010
Location: Roswell, GA
Posts: 8,282

Bikes: '93 Trek 750, '92 Schwinn Crisscross, '93 Mongoose Alta

Mentioned: 30 Post(s)
Tagged: 0 Thread(s)
Quoted: 1421 Post(s)
Liked 1,042 Times in 697 Posts
Originally Posted by caloso View Post
I have the second one. I use it all the time and it's excellent.
I have it also and it is my primary stand
dsbrantjr is offline  
Old 01-07-22, 09:35 AM
  #20  
blinky
senior member
 
Join Date: Oct 2005
Location: Connecticut
Posts: 350

Bikes: 2003 Litespeed Tuscany with Ultegra R-8000 components

Mentioned: 0 Post(s)
Tagged: 0 Thread(s)
Quoted: 142 Post(s)
Liked 37 Times in 32 Posts
Wall Mount - Park

Bench Mount - Park

I've had a few tripod fold up stands but I'm seriously thinking of getting a fixed for the garage , either post or bench mount using lag bolts - and the Race FC posted above looks like a good choice for something portable .

Last edited by blinky; 01-07-22 at 09:39 AM.
blinky is offline  
Old 01-07-22, 10:46 AM
  #21  
squirtdad
Senior Member
 
squirtdad's Avatar
 
Join Date: Jul 2006
Location: San Jose (Willow Glen) Ca
Posts: 8,657

Bikes: 85 team Miyata (modern 5800 105) , '84 Team Miyata,(dura ace old school) 80?? SR Semi-Pro 600 Arabesque

Mentioned: 91 Post(s)
Tagged: 0 Thread(s)
Quoted: 1782 Post(s)
Liked 1,486 Times in 904 Posts
Originally Posted by SoSmellyAir View Post
The folding mechanism of the Park stand you linked above is a bipod, i.e., only two, not three, folding legs; we have covered this before (Bike Forums - View Single Post - Bike Stand recommendation).
It is not the number of folding legs, it is the contact points. The park is a tripod, the 2 legs and the main tube are the contact points

It is super steady, and should not be not considered because of the the incorrect idea that 4 legs are inherently more stable. (especially if you every need to use on anything but a perfectly level floor)

not to say the other are not good stands, but this IMHO is not decision point. Cost and weight may be, but that is a different discussion

I certainly have done hugely heavy duty wrenching using the park, so has a bike charity I work with that sets up outside to help people with bikes.

time for ride (well after a couple hours of work)
__________________
Life is too short not to ride the best bike you have, as much as you can
(looking for Torpado Super light 56,57 or so)

squirtdad is offline  
Likes For squirtdad:
Old 01-07-22, 11:53 AM
  #22  
SoSmellyAir
Method to My Madness
 
Join Date: Nov 2020
Location: Orange County, California
Posts: 1,903

Bikes: Cannondale Synapse, Cannondale CAAD4, Trek FX 2

Mentioned: 3 Post(s)
Tagged: 0 Thread(s)
Quoted: 907 Post(s)
Liked 600 Times in 455 Posts
Originally Posted by squirtdad View Post
It is not the number of folding legs, it is the contact points. The park is a tripod, the 2 legs and the main tube are the contact points

It is super steady, and should not be not considered because of the the incorrect idea that 4 legs are inherently more stable. (especially if you every need to use on anything but a perfectly level floor)

not to say the other are not good stands, but this IMHO is not decision point. Cost and weight may be, but that is a different discussion
Both types of stands -- bipod folding and tripod folding mechanisms -- each has only 3 contact points. The former works as you said. The latter has only 3 legs, each of which contacts the ground. (4 contact points would be inherently unstable unless the ground is perfectly flat.)

To clarify, I have nothing against Park Tools (own several) or its stand (no experience). I was only pointing out the two different folding mechanisms and how the potential failure of the clamp which secures each in an unfolded configuration might lead to a collapse (i.e., folding) of the bipod but not the tripod, especially if a bike is already mounted off the ground. Of course this is only theoretical and may never happen in real life.

The QR seat post clamp of the Park Tool stands (only some have this?) and the different footprints imposed by the different folding mechanisms are of course also factors for consideration.

Last edited by SoSmellyAir; 01-07-22 at 11:56 AM.
SoSmellyAir is offline  
Old 01-07-22, 11:56 AM
  #23  
blacknbluebikes 
Senior Member
 
blacknbluebikes's Avatar
 
Join Date: Jul 2013
Location: NJ, USA
Posts: 987

Bikes: two blacks, a blue and a white.

Mentioned: 2 Post(s)
Tagged: 0 Thread(s)
Quoted: 336 Post(s)
Liked 536 Times in 269 Posts
Originally Posted by 70sSanO View Post
I have a Feedback Ultralight, which is a shorter version of the Elite.

I have used it for over 5 years. The only issue was the arm pin broke, but I replaced it with a bolt and didn’t miss a beat.

It is not so stable that I can break loose, or torque a bottom bracket, without a wheel on the ground to absorb the torque. But other than a few instances, I can do any maintenance.

I would probably opt for the $180 Feedback stand. The Park is more substantial, and $100 more, but a lightweight quick setup stand gets used a lot more than one that is heavy to move around and setup. At least in my experience.

John
I also have this one. Highly recommend. Very stable. This model suits me well because I often take it outside, both for wrenching and washing.
https://www.jensonusa.com/Feedback-S...ght-Work-Stand
blacknbluebikes is offline  
Old 01-07-22, 11:57 AM
  #24  
cyccommute 
Mad bike riding scientist
 
cyccommute's Avatar
 
Join Date: Nov 2004
Location: Denver, CO
Posts: 25,495

Bikes: Some silver ones, a red one, a black and orange one, and a few titanium ones

Mentioned: 138 Post(s)
Tagged: 1 Thread(s)
Quoted: 5010 Post(s)
Liked 2,595 Times in 1,532 Posts
Originally Posted by squirtdad View Post
A good workstand is the best investment in bike tools i have ever made

I am partial to the park https://www.jensonusa.com/Park-Tool-...c-Repair-Stand
While I agree that a good work stand is a great investment…got mine in the early 90s…I hate that head. The only work stand head worth having is the commercial grade Park version. I upgraded my stands (one at home and the other at my daughter’s house) from the spring version to the 100-9C for the first stand and the 100-3C for the second one.



__________________
Stuart Black
Gold Fever Three days of dirt in Colorado
Pokin' around the Poconos A cold ride around Lake Erie
Dinosaurs in Colorado A mountain bike guide to the Purgatory Canyon dinosaur trackway
Solo Without Pie. The search for pie in the Midwest.
Picking the Scablands. Washington and Oregon, 2005. Pie and spiders on the Columbia River!
Days of Wineless Roads. Bed and Breakfasting along the KATY
Twisting Down the Alley. Misadventures in tornado alley.
cyccommute is offline  
Old 01-07-22, 12:14 PM
  #25  
cyccommute 
Mad bike riding scientist
 
cyccommute's Avatar
 
Join Date: Nov 2004
Location: Denver, CO
Posts: 25,495

Bikes: Some silver ones, a red one, a black and orange one, and a few titanium ones

Mentioned: 138 Post(s)
Tagged: 1 Thread(s)
Quoted: 5010 Post(s)
Liked 2,595 Times in 1,532 Posts
Originally Posted by pbass View Post
I have some Jenson $$ to spend and was looking at this stand: https://www.jensonusa.com/Feedback-R...epair-Stand-20

My question is: this will be for my garage and learning to wrench on my bikes, not for travel as this thing is ideally intended for, so the portability factor isn't important to me. Is something like this gonna offer enough support for those times when you gotta muscle some component into submission? I'm used to watching the pros at my LBS work on their stands that are mounted to the floor!

Next level up would be this, which looks more stable, but still, not terribly much more: https://www.jensonusa.com/Feedback-S...nic-Work-Stand
I’ve used the Feedback at outdoor events and I find the clamp mechanism to be fiddly. You have to get it wide enough to take whatever tube you are clamping to, then slide it down to actually clamp the tube, then screw the clamp down so that the bike doesn’t move. It’s difficult to do one handed. Jenson has Park Stands as well and I find them easier to use even with the cheaper clamp. The longer legs on the Park stand makes it more stable than the Feedback tripod as well. The tripod has a fairly small footprint even though it has 3 legs.

Originally Posted by pbass View Post
Interesting points. On both my bikes I have setback seatposts, and not much seatpost showing. The clamp would invariably be on the bend in the seatpost, unless I pull the seatpost out more. Or, I clamp to the frame. Both my bikes are steel, so probably not an issue.
Pull the seatpost out more. I avoid clamping frames as much as possible. A trick I use at home and at my local co-op is to mark the post with a Sharpie before I put it in the stand. Pull the seatpost out enough to clamp, work on the bike, and then push the seatpost back in. A seat post is far cheaper than a frame if something goes wrong.
__________________
Stuart Black
Gold Fever Three days of dirt in Colorado
Pokin' around the Poconos A cold ride around Lake Erie
Dinosaurs in Colorado A mountain bike guide to the Purgatory Canyon dinosaur trackway
Solo Without Pie. The search for pie in the Midwest.
Picking the Scablands. Washington and Oregon, 2005. Pie and spiders on the Columbia River!
Days of Wineless Roads. Bed and Breakfasting along the KATY
Twisting Down the Alley. Misadventures in tornado alley.
cyccommute is offline  
Likes For cyccommute:

Thread Tools
Search this Thread

Contact Us - Archive - Advertising - Cookie Policy - Privacy Statement - Terms of Service - Do Not Sell My Personal Information -

Copyright © 2021 MH Sub I, LLC dba Internet Brands. All rights reserved. Use of this site indicates your consent to the Terms of Use.