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Building another second rear wheel

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Building another second rear wheel

Old 02-26-22, 04:59 PM
  #26  
bikerbobbbb
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non drive side again



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Old 02-26-22, 05:10 PM
  #27  
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And then for my thinking....

drive side, ds, would be the cassette side, right side as you sit on the bike, so that's clockwise in these pics.for how the wheel rotates
non drive side, nds, is the plain/non-cassette side, left side as you sit on the bike, so that's counterclockwise in these pics for how the wheel rotates

And then trailing/pulling spokes would be spokes attached at the top (when the bike/wheel is upright) of the hub, pulling on the rim. And those are supposed to be under-under-over for the spokes they cross when it's cross three laces. Although to me, that first spoke it crosses it barely there. It does cross under those first two, but there's not a lot of choice there. The mid spokes then are "supposed" to have the trailing/pulling spoke crossing OVER the other spoke then. Although it sounds like there might be pros and cons either way. I just want a standard cross three, typical, cookie cutter wheel.

rotation in red
trailing/pulling spokes lined next to them in green here

ds



nds




No more weight and spoke breaking issues apparently. The only big events for my rear wheel building were the rear wheel that busted (big event) and that same wheel had a bit of a wobble going before that (minor though compared to breaking the hub).





So.... How do these look now with better pictures?

Next steps (assuming the lacing is correct) will be...
Smashing the elbow/hub side spokes in closed to the hub.
Sticking the dork disk and cassette back on.
And then dishing it more and truing it. It was easier I think in 2017 to tuck paper towels in when the spokes were a little looser.
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Old 02-26-22, 05:27 PM
  #28  
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Originally Posted by KCT1986 View Post
Yes, what you have seems to be trailing spokes head-out, mirrored left & right. See #2 in the diagram. As mentioned in my post yesterday, one of the common patterns.


So I'm 2 in those pics. Both on my 2017/current wheel and the copy/2022 rebuilt wheel. Looking at the top row of pics only though. Yellow arrows are the movement of the spoke sideways, so you want the spoke on that yellow arrow head side so it's pressing against the other spoke.

And then it might not really matter if it's the other way, the 1 pics, except for how the chain might hit the spokes if it's throw off. Even then it hits the plastic disk. And those spokes are under tension and tight against each other. It would really have to hit the spokes just right and wedge itself in between the spokes.... Unless they mean bouncing off all the spokes in general vs. getting in between any spokes at all in general.... Only the drive side for that. I don't think I've ever had a chain jump off and get sucked up in the spokes though. I don't think my bike is set up for that with the plastic disk in the way. It's probably a pretty minor scenario where that would happen. I haven't the chain go over the largest cog in the cassette. It has fallen or jumped off the very smallest cogs around the skewer or whatever goes through wheel, just that end of the hub without cogs section I guess.
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Old 02-27-22, 02:45 PM
  #29  
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Originally Posted by bikerbobbbb View Post
So I'm 2 in those pics. Both on my 2017/current wheel and the copy/2022 rebuilt wheel. Looking at the top row of pics only though. Yellow arrows are the movement of the spoke sideways, so you want the spoke on that yellow arrow head side so it's pressing against the other spoke.

And then it might not really matter if it's the other way, the 1 pics, except for how the chain might hit the spokes if it's throw off. Even then it hits the plastic disk. And those spokes are under tension and tight against each other. It would really have to hit the spokes just right and wedge itself in between the spokes.... Unless they mean bouncing off all the spokes in general vs. getting in between any spokes at all in general.... Only the drive side for that. I don't think I've ever had a chain jump off and get sucked up in the spokes though. I don't think my bike is set up for that with the plastic disk in the way. It's probably a pretty minor scenario where that would happen. I haven't the chain go over the largest cog in the cassette. It has fallen or jumped off the very smallest cogs around the skewer or whatever goes through wheel, just that end of the hub without cogs section I guess.
I bought a bike where the chain was dumped into the spokes. The problem isn't that you continue cranking with the chain on the spokes, but that the wheel keeps turning. The steel side plates start cutting the spoke, and then instead of a 1.5 mm cross section wire at 110 kg/f, you have a 1.3 mm cross section with stress risers. The folks here pointed out that the reason I kept breaking spokes on a wheel was because the chain had been dumped into the spokes at some point, and to confirm it by pulling the cassette and checking the outside spokes for nicks or rough spots. Sure enough, all 6 of the remaining outer spokes were nicked behind the cassette.
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Old 02-27-22, 04:36 PM
  #30  
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Originally Posted by bikerbobbbb View Post
So I'm 2 in those pics. Both on my 2017/current wheel and the copy/2022 rebuilt wheel. Looking at the top row of pics only though. Yellow arrows are the movement of the spoke sideways, so you want the spoke on that yellow arrow head side so it's pressing against the other spoke.

And then it might not really matter if it's the other way, the 1 pics, except for how the chain might hit the spokes if it's throw off. Even then it hits the plastic disk. And those spokes are under tension and tight against each other. It would really have to hit the spokes just right and wedge itself in between the spokes.... Unless they mean bouncing off all the spokes in general vs. getting in between any spokes at all in general.... Only the drive side for that. I don't think I've ever had a chain jump off and get sucked up in the spokes though. I don't think my bike is set up for that with the plastic disk in the way. It's probably a pretty minor scenario where that would happen. I haven't the chain go over the largest cog in the cassette. It has fallen or jumped off the very smallest cogs around the skewer or whatever goes through wheel, just that end of the hub without cogs section I guess.
The yellow arrow shows the movement at the outer cross where the spokes overlap, bend, and push on each other. Under load the spokes will try to straighten. The assumption is that the trailing spokes, top #2 in your case, will have a greater force that the leading spoke, bottom #2, and thus pull inwards, away from the derailleur cage. This is what you specifically seem to desire. Images top and bottom are representation of the same spoke pattern (either #1, [head-in for trailing spoke, head-out for leading spoke], or #2 [head-out for trailing spoke,..].

As for chain-drop, some feel that the head-out, elbow-in, of the trailing spoke is better since they feel that this heavier loaded spoke will get less damaged.

Both patterns have supporters and their reasons....
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