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Building rear moutain bike wheel advice needed?

Old 03-02-22, 09:07 AM
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Originally Posted by TPL View Post
semantics = all rims have a INNER wall ....and an OUTER wall ...hence, 2 walls !
'
'What most people mean when they somewhat casually refer to a rim as 'double wall' is actually a 'box modular' constructed rim ....'box modular' is the proper term
Search "box modular rim" and "double wall rim" and see what they get you.

Double wall appears to be the industry standard nomenclature and I know I'd get a blank stare if I walked in my LBS and asked for a box modular rim.
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Old 03-02-22, 12:54 PM
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Hi! dedhed!

Thanks for your input! The"Silver Heavy duty Velocity Cliffhanger 26" Rear Wheel Rim Brake" is for an 8,9, and 10 speed cassette. My present cassette is a 7 speed. What changes would I have to make to make this wheel work because I have a 7 speed freewheel and 7 speed cassette? At this price all I'd need is a new derailleur, or would I have to get new shifters and front derailleur too? Does that trick work where you make an 8 speed freewheel into a 7 speed by taking out the largest gear work? I have a long climb up a bluff before I get to my apartment bldg so I like a 32T for my largest freewheel gear, or maybe it's a 34T. Would it be hard to have that size of a gear with an 8 speed freewheel?

With the second suggestion, the "Sun Rhyno Lite 40 spoke 26: MTB Commuter Wheelset Rim Brake" (2 wheels front and back) is that front wheel better than my present front wheel a "Mustang E.R.D. 542 Front" that has a Surly hub? With that set-up it is also for an 8, 9, and 10 speed cassette. Would it be strong enough for when I go camping and pull a CoHo X one wheeled trailer?

Thanks for all the work you've gone through to find those wheels!

Cheers!
Winfred
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Old 03-02-22, 01:15 PM
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Originally Posted by wesmamyke View Post
I would inspect the XT hub very carefully before investing any time in rebuilding it. That generation is somewhat notorious for cone/axle issues.
Hi wesmamyke!

So that XT hub isn't like the first shop guy I went to said about that hub, "that hub is nothing short of awesome." I'm really glad you told me as I think I won't use it. Can an experienced mechanic tell if it feels like something is wrong when they spin it? I'm very grateful to you and all here!

Carpe Diem!
Winfred
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Old 03-02-22, 01:24 PM
  #29  
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Originally Posted by winfred0000 View Post
Hi! dedhed!

Thanks for your input! The"Silver Heavy duty Velocity Cliffhanger 26" Rear Wheel Rim Brake" is for an 8,9, and 10 speed cassette. My present cassette is a 7 speed. What changes would I have to make to make this wheel work because I have a 7 speed freewheel and 7 speed cassette? At this price all I'd need is a new derailleur, or would I have to get new shifters and front derailleur too? Does that trick work where you make an 8 speed freewheel into a 7 speed by taking out the largest gear work? I have a long climb up a bluff before I get to my apartment bldg so I like a 32T for my largest freewheel gear, or maybe it's a 34T. Would it be hard to have that size of a gear with an 8 speed freewheel?

With the second suggestion, the "Sun Rhyno Lite 40 spoke 26: MTB Commuter Wheelset Rim Brake" (2 wheels front and back) is that front wheel better than my present front wheel a "Mustang E.R.D. 542 Front" that has a Surly hub? With that set-up it is also for an 8, 9, and 10 speed cassette. Would it be strong enough for when I go camping and pull a CoHo X one wheeled trailer?

Thanks for all the work you've gone through to find those wheels!

Cheers!
Winfred
If you currently have a 7 speed cassette, you will just need a spacer (I think 4mm?) behind it when installed on the new wheel. If it is a 7 speed freewheel you will need to replace it with a cassette, and maybe replace your chain if itís worn. You wonít have to replace derailleur, shifters etc.

As far as inspecting the hub before rebuilding, remove the axle and bearings, clean everything well and inspect all bearing surfaces for pitting and wear. There are good tutorials on YouTube or SheldonBrown.com for this.
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Old 03-02-22, 01:30 PM
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Old 03-02-22, 01:53 PM
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Freewheel and cassette are not interchangeable terms. They are 2 very different things.


You need to determine which it is you have. Don't get hung up on "awesome" XT hub - it's 24 years old with how many miles on it and what maintenance in that time? Any?
You also need to determine your rear spacing, likely 135mm but could be 130mm. You'd need to re-space a 130mm to fit a 135mm OLD hub in.

Can't say if something is better or worse than what you have just that pre-built heavy duty wheels are out there without the need for a custom build. Non of those wheels are going to be weaker than your 24 year old failing ones.


Assuming your existing drive train is shimano and not knowing specific models you could likely update to 8 or 9 speed with shifters, cassette, and chain alone

https://www.rei.com/product/737175/s...E&gclsrc=aw.ds

https://www.universalcycles.com/shop...&category=6976
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Old 03-02-22, 07:17 PM
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Originally Posted by bboy314 View Post
Agree with this suggestion. A lot of Surlys were sold with this XT/Adventurer wheel, I donít recall seeing issues with the rim but I did come across several with pitted cones and collapsing hub shells. And in general this is good advice for rebuilding with any used hub.
Yeah, I thought it was the Surly bikes that came with them. We had a bin full of trashed XT hubs, I think they all came from Surly complete bikes.
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Old 03-02-22, 09:50 PM
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Originally Posted by winfred0000 View Post
Hi wesmamyke!

So that XT hub isn't like the first shop guy I went to said about that hub, "that hub is nothing short of awesome." I'm really glad you told me as I think I won't use it. Can an experienced mechanic tell if it feels like something is wrong when they spin it? I'm very grateful to you and all here!

Carpe Diem!
Winfred
In general Shimano XT is very solid, only XTR being better or more expensive for mountain bike stuff from them. That specific hub had issues in my experience. I'm not sure if it was teething issues switching to the aluminum axle, or just poor adjustment from the factory. Could be a bunch of things really. They are pretty obviously crunchy feeling when spun in the hand, shouldn't be too hard to figure out if it's okay.
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Old 03-03-22, 06:01 PM
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Hi dedhed, and anyone else too!

I am very grateful to you all sharing such invaluable advice! I got a warning I can only have 5 replies every 24hrs. I also got a warning I can't quote a link yet so go to post #24. From the 2 wheels you suggested and gave links to the other day... First I should say... I live in a very small space in a Seniors high-rise, so no shop or garage. I could set up a folding card table to inspect my present Shimano XT FH-M770 36H Rear 7 speed cassette hub, but… my being an amateur, if that, and now learning of the problematic history of this particular Shimano XT hub, and it actually being a 24 yr old hub, I’m thinking of not going that route.

I don't own a car which makes my one bike, subject to multiple use from errands, hopefully pulling a CoHo X trailer camping, and exercise runs, that my one bike means more to me than most people. Which of the choices below that you suggested in your earlier reply do you think is better?

You suggest a, “Sun Rhyno Lite 40 spoke 26" MTB Commuter Wheel set Rim Brake, meaning a set of both front and rear wheels. “SUNRIMS RHYNO LITE 6000 Series 622 x 27mm” and I guess that means “double walled” rim, right? They are reduced in price from 349 down to 229. Is that because maybe 26” wheels don’t sell so well anymore? They say both wheels have 40 hole rims, “strong enough for an ox!”, alloy sealed bearing 8/9/10 speed non disk hubs, compatible with SRAM or Shimano. I presently have a SRAM 7 speed cassette with only about 300 miles on it. I hope to be able to transfer it onto my next wheel. By a miracle amid the shortages, I locally found a SRAM 7 speed cassette. It was good to learn that I was interchanging “freewheel” with “cassette” thinking it was the same term ha!

The other wheel you suggest is: “Silver Heavy Duty Velocity Cliffhanger 26" REAR WHEEL RIM BRAKE”, “Model: WE2733 REAR”, double walled for 119. They show the Shimano hubs but do not name what particular model of hubs they are. They have the “Shimano” name on them and that’s it. The rear rim has 135mm spacing. Does 135mm designate how many spokes per wheel? The rims do not have those little islets in the spoke holes – so not as strong? They don’t say how many “DT Swiss” spokes per wheel. Since it’s a “set” my present front wheel is a “Mustang E.R.D. 542” 32H with a “Surly” hub the guy with the first shop said is another “nothing less than awesome” hub. Is my present front wheel better than the front wheel with this set?

I have the 47-559 Suomi Tyres W240 and 26 x 1.9 studded tires for winter ($100 ea made in Finland). I spent more because I had a bad fall on ice in 2014 and have had studded tires in winter ever since. In summer I have the Schwalbe Marathon Plus 50-559 and 26 x 2.0 that were $63 each. Will those tires work on either the Rhyno Lite or the Cliffhanger rims? Still what counts most is how strong the wheels are and would change accordingly, but just curious. Also, after all I’ve gone through with 2 rear wheels going and how much of a set-back it’s been each time… I decided I’m willing to spend maybe 300 if I really have to for a rear wheel. I mean I live, at 68 yrs old, on a low Social Security income. Is more expensive necessarily better?

The second shop “SS” I went to on Tuesday the mechanic started looking up parts for a their free estimate then quit as he was busy and only an hour from closing. He suggested a “White” brand hub, but a 385 hub! They mainly serve an upper middle class to upper class area. He said he and the bike department manager would look things up and email their estimate to me. It’s 5:30PM Thursday and nothing… and unfortunately like other things with them (a long story) I have a feeling they will either never do it or a week from now I’ll find out. The only reason I quietly go back to them is because they are somewhat like a “coop” and I get a dividend rebate on my parts and their array of bicycle and outdoor things at the end of the year.

Carpe Diem!

Winfred

Last edited by winfred0000; 03-03-22 at 06:05 PM. Reason: mentioning referring to post #24 for reference
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Old 03-03-22, 07:03 PM
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My vote: buy the $120 Velocity Cliffhanger rear wheel (sounds like you already have a solid front wheel) and ride on! Since your bike is your main transportation, thatíll leave money leftover for other repairs and maintenance that will come up. You could pay a good shop to check spoke tension and install on your bike and adjust your shifting and brake with the new wheel if you want that peace of mind, or do it yourself. Donít forget youíll need a spacer for your 7 speed cassette.
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Old 03-03-22, 07:52 PM
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135 mm is rear frame spacing

https://www.sheldonbrown.com/frame-spacing.html
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Old 03-03-22, 08:42 PM
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Andy is right...
Originally Posted by Andrew R Stewart View Post
I agree with your trying to build a wheel yourself. I have to say that you and whatever you are carrying will be a big load on any rear wheel. I would expect to find a few years from now that you have gone through more spokes and rims. Learning how to do this stuff will save future money...
Rats!!! Your out a rear wheel, you have never built a wheel, and ya need a good strong wheel. I am still totally surprised at what wheels are costing with just a normal hub. There was a guy over in Austin that was bragging about building a wheel set for his tandem for less than 600 USD. That seems like allot of money to me especially if your building it yourself, but what do I know?

So the shop estimates a cost of 80 USD to assemble a strong wheel for you using your old hub. Lets see, a strong rim (50+ USD) with 36 heavy duty spokes (40+ USD) so taking it in for assembly about 170+ USD total. Actually that's not bad. Remember that you are doing all the foot work, ordering, and waiting for the items to arrive.

Having been 285 and restricted to ChroMo frames and suffering multiple popped spokes often for no reason at all I completely sympathize with you. Teaching yourself how to build a good strong wheel is truly rewarding and a skill you can use over and over as I do not see the cost of wheel replacement going down, ever.

I personally would buy another wheel on the cheap side 120 USD and ride it as I put my future bullet proof wheel together. Ya loose less ride time and can also take your time learning wheel building skills.

Also note that when I got down to about 250 I stopped popping spokes. Now at 240 I still remain diligent in keeping my wheels true. I use 14ga DT Stainless Steel spokes and take no short cuts on my wheel inspections. I can build wheels but prefer not to. I just order economical machine built wheels and then when I get them I loosen everything up and rebuild them slowly and carefully.
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Old 03-03-22, 09:46 PM
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Couple of comments:

The FH-TX500 that was quoted to you is not a very high-end hub and has minimum dust/weather sealing. The hub on the prebuilt is probably similar, you should at least inquire on what hub is used. Unfortunately, Shimano has reduced the models that they sell for MTB 135mm rim brake wheels, most are disk brake hubs now. Don't know if they have any non-disk brake hubs in 40H. The FH-T610, in their touring/trekking, is probably a better option.

The FH-M770 is not 24 years old, it is more like 15-18 years. To check if it is having issues, at least remove the wheel from the bike and turn the axle by hand & feel for any roughness or sticky points during the rotation.

Any rim marked as 622 is the wrong size. 622 is for 700C road tires or 29 inch MTB tires. 559 would be the correct size for 26" tire, as you note about the tires you use. This is the size of the rim or tire bead set, where the tire hooks into the side wall on the rim.
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Old 03-03-22, 10:19 PM
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Originally Posted by bboy314 View Post
My vote: buy the $120 Velocity Cliffhanger rear wheel (sounds like you already have a solid front wheel) and ride on! Since your bike is your main transportation, thatíll leave money leftover for other repairs and maintenance that will come up. You could pay a good shop to check spoke tension and install on your bike and adjust your shifting and brake with the new wheel if you want that peace of mind, or do it yourself. Donít forget youíll need a spacer for your 7 speed cassette.
Hi bboy314 and to anyone here!

Thanks very much for your input! Please bare with me still asking questions as Iím such an amateur. So those islets around the spoke holes in the rim donít make much difference with strength? I ask because the Cliffhanger for $119 doesnít have them.

Is that wheel strong enough I can go camping and pull a CoHo X trailer too?

They say: ď...the rear hub is 135mm spacing for Hybrids 'Crossover' bikes or your Mountain Bike.Ē Does that mean the space in the frame for them to fit is okay because my 1998 Diamond Back 3140 CroMo frame is a standard mountain bike frame and would have 135mm spacingÖ so donít worry about that?

Are the brass nipples this wheel has okay in regions where they use salt on the streets like here in Minnesota?

This is probably a foolish question butÖ why donít they say what kind of Shimano hub they use?

Also with my present tube type tires like the Suomi 240 studded tires 26 x 1.9 for winter and my Schwalbe Marathon plus 26 x 2.0 for summer will fit okay with the Cliffhanger 25mm inner rim width?

Will my tube type tires work even though they say their rim is for tubeless tires? If their rim is for tubeless tires arenít they supposed to have a mounted presta valve on them?

They also donít say how many spokes per wheel. Is it okay not to worry because their rims are so strong itís not important to say how many spokes their wheel has?

Thanks very much!

Winfred
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Old 03-03-22, 10:49 PM
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Originally Posted by KCT1986 View Post
Couple of comments:


The FH-TX500 that was quoted to you is not a very high-end hub and has minimum dust/weather sealing. The hub on the prebuilt is probably similar, you should at least inquire on what hub is used. Unfortunately, Shimano has reduced the models that they sell for MTB 135mm rim brake wheels, most are disk brake hubs now. Don't know if they have any non-disk brake hubs in 40H. The FH-T610, in their touring/trekking, is probably a better option.


The FH-M770 is not 24 years old, it is more like 15-18 years. To check if it is having issues, at least remove the wheel from the bike and turn the axle by hand & feel for any roughness or sticky points during the rotation.


Any rim marked as 622 is the wrong size. 622 is for 700C road tires or 29 inch MTB tires. 559 would be the correct size for 26" tire, as you note about the tires you use. This is the size of the rim or tire bead set, where the tire hooks into the side wall on the rim.


Hi KCT1986!

Thanks so much for your feedback! I'm glad you mentioned the FH-TX500 is not very good. I was wondering with the Cliffhanger why they didn't say what type of Shimano hubs they have. Do they look like the FH-TX500's? If I decide I'll ask the Cliffhanger company what they are. It seems strange they don't say what they are. Also, so the Cliffhanger hubs look like they are for disk brake bikes? The link to that wheel is at post #24. Also for the Rhyolite wheels -- link is at the same post. Also the Rhylite hubs look like they are for disk brake bikes? Also, I didn't know what 622 meant with the Rhyolite wheels! That's what I by luck saw in the photo of the Rhyolite rim. I didn't see 622 in their description. I suppose things like that are easy to miss when selling so many wheels, but I think they should as it's a crucial figure. Maybe they assume people nowadays have 29 inch wheels as I think 26 inch is becoming very rare.


Also a month ago I was at the "first shop" I mentioned earlier the day I tried to get two estimates, last Tuesday. I was there with a flat tire and it took the mechanic major time to find a 26 inch tube with a presta valve. He said kind of like you were saying that 26 inch is rare nowadays. They never fixed it as it still went flat 2 hours later and had to walk my bike home ha! Then when I brought it back (I didn't ride for a month as I'd been sick and also a lot of below zero weather) they sold that liquid tire seal and squirted that in and said it would be good even though he said he found that my valve core was loose. By the next day the tire was flat again ha! I think somehow, even though it's brand new, it's that valve core that must have some kind of defect. I won't go back there also because even though I was asking for a free estimate to build my rear wheel he really pressured me to have him build the wheel and not go to any other shop for a free estimate. He took it personally like I was insulting him going to another shop for an estimate.


Is the 25mm rim width with the Cliffhanger okay for my Schwalbe summer tires and my Suomi winter tires?


Thanks!

Winfred
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Old 03-03-22, 11:26 PM
  #41  
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Originally Posted by zandoval View Post
Andy is right...



Rats!!! Your out a rear wheel, you have never built a wheel, and ya need a good strong wheel. I am still totally surprised at what wheels are costing with just a normal hub. There was a guy over in Austin that was bragging about building a wheel set for his tandem for less than 600 USD. That seems like allot of money to me especially if your building it yourself, but what do I know?


So the shop estimates a cost of 80 USD to assemble a strong wheel for you using your old hub. Lets see, a strong rim (50+ USD) with 36 heavy duty spokes (40+ USD) so taking it in for assembly about 170+ USD total. Actually that's not bad. Remember that you are doing all the foot work, ordering, and waiting for the items to arrive.


Having been 285 and restricted to ChroMo frames and suffering multiple popped spokes often for no reason at all I completely sympathize with you. Teaching yourself how to build a good strong wheel is truly rewarding and a skill you can use over and over as I do not see the cost of wheel replacement going down, ever.


I personally would buy another wheel on the cheap side 120 USD and ride it as I put my future bullet proof wheel together. Ya loose less ride time and can also take your time learning wheel building skills.


Also note that when I got down to about 250 I stopped popping spokes. Now at 240 I still remain diligent in keeping my wheels true. I use 14ga DT Stainless Steel spokes and take no short cuts on my wheel inspections. I can build wheels but prefer not to. I just order economical machine built wheels and then when I get them I loosen everything up and rebuild them slowly and carefully.


Hi Zandoval!

Thanks very much for your feedback! I didn't know at my weight it means then having to use only the 4030 Cro-Mo frames because the other types like graphite etc would crack or break? Really though I can't afford the titanium and graphite type of frames. My frame the shop said is from 1998. I just weighed myself and at 280.6lbs right now and lost 5lbs by eating less and juicing once a day. I've lost as much as 33lbs juicing 3 times a day when I first got my juicer, but gained it all back. I lost other times with other diets 27lbs, 21lbs, 12lbs and always gained back. I might have that gastric bypass surgery and this is my last attempt. I fasted 4 days and 6 hours, but got very constipated after that. If I don't lose enough by 3-15-22 I will then decide on the surgery... only they reduce your stomach size to the size of a chicken's egg and for the rest of your life you have to live on supplements high in nutrients so you absorb enough to stay healthy. The thing is I'm 68 and with my Bucket List I want to go around the world and take several years to do it with either an ebike or the bike I now have. Losing the weight eliminates a lot of other problems too, so a trade-off.


So you buy a cheaper wheel, loosen all the spokes, then tighten them again? Is that what you mean? Why do you bother to take the wheel apart... if that's what maybe you mean, and put it back together again. You do that for practice? The Cliffhanger wheel for $119 I see does have the islets in the spoke holes. They say it's a "workhorse" wheel, but will like you have had happening... the spokes with no islets will pop through as at times I carry about 60lbs of groceries. I also want to pull a CoHo X trailer and go camping. I would have to build my wheel and take it to a shop to have the final truing, only the first shop I went to last Tuesday for a free estimate, that mechanic said it's very difficult to build a wheel right, and even if you do 75% of the building time is the final truing. It's $60 to build a wheel in Minnesota, so I guess I'd only save 25% of $60 unless I could get parts for less than the shop. The second shop I go to I get a dividend return at the end of the year, either that or in-store credit at any time on any parts I buy. I guess I could buy my parts through them, save on the dividend return, and 25% of $60. The first shop said if I built it and took it to them for final truing that they would not give their warranty, but I never asked the second shop that question. I still might buy a ready-made rear wheel, but not sure as I'll see what others say. Thanks very much for your feedback!!


Carpe Diem!

Winfred
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Old 03-03-22, 11:49 PM
  #42  
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Originally Posted by dedhed View Post
Hi dedhed and to anyone here!

Thanks very much for your input! Please bare with me still asking questions as Iím such an amateur. So those islets around the spoke holes in the rim donít make much difference with strength? I ask because the Cliffhanger for $119 doesnít have them.

Is that wheel strong enough I can go camping and pull a CoHo X trailer too?

Also look in the photo of the "Sun Rhyno Lite 40 spoke 26" MTB Commuter Wheelset Rim Brake" where it says 622mm x 27mm and another guy here said that those wheels are 29 inches. Is there maybe a wrong photo to represent the wheel they are selling? They don't list it as 622mm x 27mm but maybe the photo is wrong.

They say: ď...the rear hub is 135mm spacing for Hybrids 'Crossover' bikes or your Mountain Bike.Ē Does that mean the space in the frame for them to fit is okay because my 1998 Diamond Back 3140 CroMo frame is a standard mountain bike frame and would have 135mm spacingÖ so donít worry about that?

Are the brass nipples this wheel has okay in regions where they use salt on the streets like here in Minnesota?

This is probably a foolish question butÖ why donít they say what kind of Shimano hub they use?

Also with my present tube type tires like the Suomi 240 studded tires 26 x 1.9 for winter and my Schwalbe Marathon plus 26 x 2.0 for summer will fit okay with the Cliffhanger 25mm inner rim width?

Will my tube type tires work even though they say their rim is for tubeless tires? If their rim is for tubeless tires arenít they supposed to have a mounted presta valve on them?

They also donít say how many spokes per wheel. Is it okay not to worry because their rims are so strong itís not important to say how many spokes their wheel has?

That's a great article about the cold bending to make it 135mm for the rear hub. I'm so amateur I'm afraid I'd crack the frame or the like and will have that second shop do it instead.

Sorry about my learning curve being kind of flat. I am very grateful to you and all here!

Thanks very much!

Winfred
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Old 03-04-22, 01:31 AM
  #43  
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Originally Posted by zandoval View Post
Andy is right...


Also note that when I got down to about 250 I stopped popping spokes. Now at 240 I still remain diligent in keeping my wheels true. I use 14ga DT Stainless Steel spokes and take no short cuts on my wheel inspections. I can build wheels but prefer not to. I just order economical machine built wheels and then when I get them I loosen everything up and rebuild them slowly and carefully.
Yes, I have a quad, 4 seats on two 26" wheels with 48 spokes per wheel using 2.0mm (14g) DT spokes. Rule is each rider has to weigh under 150 pounds for a bike and rider limit of 700 pounds. Over 5,000 miles and no broken spokes. Several broken rims however. I started with Sun CR18, then kept moving up the Sun weights as they offered heavier rims. Stuck with the original spokes with each wheel rebuild. The rims would crack from spoke hole to spoke hole on the inner "wall". Once that wall cracked the tire pressure would bow the sides of the rim out and the rim brakes would thump giving me a warning the rim was cracked. Top speed reached was 55 mph one time. We did the state 40km tt in 52:30.

I'd agree that the existing spokes on your wheel are questionable. What size, brand, material are they? All spokes are certainly not created equal or even close to it. All those black Chinese spokes are what would be called mystery meat at school lunchroom. Those are the only spokes I've broken on my bikes (stock Asian made wheels) and I'm 150 pounds. Okay so as kids we broke countless spokes playing bicycle polo with hard walnut croquet balls.

I run a local bicycle recycle coop. One of the larger bike shops in town sends us their broken wheels. They don't rebuild wheels, they only sell replacements to their customers. Alex rims are a regular donation item with cracked rims. More mystery Chinese metal. The many Asian boutique wheels with too few spokes and high spoke tension we receive have chunks of rims pulled out by the spokes.

Evenly spaced spokes, and the more there are will get you a stronger wheel.
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Old 03-04-22, 01:42 AM
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Originally Posted by winfred0000 View Post
Hi dedhed and to anyone here!

Also look in the photo of the "Sun Rhyno Lite 40 spoke 26" MTB Commuter Wheelset Rim Brake" where it says 622mm x 27mm and another guy here said that those wheels are 29 inches. Is there maybe a wrong photo to represent the wheel they are selling? They don't list it as 622mm x 27mm but maybe the photo is wrong.
Winfred
Wrong photo? probably some stock photo put there by someone who doesn't know the difference.

700c wheels (road and hybrid) rims are 622mm bead seat diameter and so are "29ers". 29ers use the same diameter rim but usually have wider mtb style tires. To keep the metric phobic USA consumers confused, some 700c wheels are labeled as being 28". To blur the difference, many gravel bikes use narrow 29ers (or wide 700c).

Anyhow a 700c or 29er will surely be too big to fit in your mtb and the rim brakes won't line up at all. 26" mtb wheels are 559 mm. 622 - 559 = 63 mm, convert to inches is 2.5 / 2 (diameter to radius) is 1 & 1/4" No way your brakes will adjust up by 1.25 inches.
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Old 03-04-22, 02:51 AM
  #45  
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Old 03-04-22, 07:11 AM
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Originally Posted by Darme View Post
Sometimes buying new pre-made wheels are more cost effective then building building wheels then again in money is no object build on.
There are sometimes good deals, and I have one set of wheels that I bought already built. But many pre-made wheels are machine built and you have to check the spoke tension and give the wheels a final truing anyway. At least, I would never take a pre-made wheel purchased online, and just throw it on my bike without having it gone over by a skilled wheelbuilder first.

On a higher-end bike, that's part of the pre-delivery service performed by the LBS before delivering the bike to a customer. Most wheels, whether purchased separately or on a new bike, don't come out of the box ready to ride - they usually need a little tweaking. At least by my standards, anyway. I never break spokes and my wheels all stay true, and it's not because I buy "better" parts. It's because they're built right.
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Old 03-04-22, 08:40 AM
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Originally Posted by bboy314 View Post
My vote: buy the $120 Velocity Cliffhanger rear wheel (sounds like you already have a solid front wheel) and ride on! Since your bike is your main transportation, thatíll leave money leftover for other repairs and maintenance that will come up. You could pay a good shop to check spoke tension and install on your bike and adjust your shifting and brake with the new wheel if you want that peace of mind, or do it yourself. Donít forget youíll need a spacer for your 7 speed cassette.
This.
We're talking about a 1998 Diamondback Mt bike. Its a $200 bike at best.
Some over thinking. No one can tell you whether any given wheel is "better" or "stronger" beyond the general, more spokes, better spokes, heavy duty rim, properly tensioned results in a stronger, more trouble free wheel. No one can take into account your riding style, road conditions, and other factors that can prolong the life of a wheel.

Or you buy a $100 used mountain bike on C/L or marketplace, use the wheel off it and have a whole bike worth of spare parts.
https://minneapolis.craigslist.org/a...440929483.html
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Old 03-04-22, 08:51 AM
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Originally Posted by rickpaulos View Post
Wrong photo? probably some stock photo put there by someone who doesn't know the difference.


700c wheels (road and hybrid) rims are 622mm bead seat diameter and so are "29ers". 29ers use the same diameter rim but usually have wider mtb style tires. To keep the metric phobic USA consumers confused, some 700c wheels are labeled as being 28". To blur the difference, many gravel bikes use narrow 29ers (or wide 700c).


Anyhow a 700c or 29er will surely be too big to fit in your mtb and the rim brakes won't line up at all. 26" mtb wheels are 559 mm. 622 - 559 = 63 mm, convert to inches is 2.5 / 2 (diameter to radius) is 1 & 1/4" No way your brakes will adjust up by 1.25 inches.

Hi Rickpaulos!

Thanks very much for taking the time! Really it's a question I should ask the seller and sorry about that as like you say maybe it is a stock photo. It's great to learn from you and appreciate your informing me! Sorry to all as I ask a lot about the Cliffhanger wheels. I just thought maybe 25mm rim width was maybe too narrow for my Schwalbe summer tires and my Suomi studded tires.


Top of the Day!

Winfred
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Old 03-04-22, 09:06 AM
  #49  
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Originally Posted by dedhed View Post
This.
We're talking about a 1998 Diamondback Mt bike. Its a $200 bike at best.
Some over thinking. No one can tell you whether any given wheel is "better" or "stronger" beyond the general, more spokes, better spokes, heavy duty rim, properly tensioned results in a stronger, more trouble free wheel. No one can take into account your riding style, road conditions, and other factors that can prolong the life of a wheel.

Or you buy a $100 used mountain bike on C/L or marketplace, use the wheel off it and have a whole bike worth of spare parts.
https://minneapolis.craigslist.org/a...440929483.html
Hi dedhed!
Wow you are so patient with me! Thanks for all of your very helpful hard work and information over my problem. I spent a lot on my existing bike and want to hang onto it at this point. Over time I added through a 'community bench" shop that doesn't exist any more V brakes and shifters I got used, a new Acera derailleur, I guess my front wheel, a Mustang E.R.D. 542 with Surly hub 32H is I hope strong enough. I'd thought that shop put in a 36H but counted last night only 32. I will I think get the Cliffhanger and have that bike coop install it and adjust my shifting... but I'll see what else transpires here and if my Suomi and Schwalbe tires will fit it. Very nice of you to do all the searching, even finding a new bike for me! I don't know what else I'd do otherwise! So many very helpful people here with independent insights as when I speak to a shop I don't exactly feel on neutral grounds, although they are there to help their clientele too. That shop now 4 days later and not emailing their free estimate so I'll have to absorb all the education here and probably in the end get the Cliffhanger.

Top of the Day!
Winfred
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Old 03-04-22, 09:13 AM
  #50  
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Hi Jeff!

I have to look out as this website only allows me 5 replies a day for some reason... maybe because I'm new. Thanks about the advice where even though one buys a brand new wheel they have to have a pro go over all the spoke tensions. The shop I bought my rear wheel from about 1 1/2 yrs ago said they went over it all. I was careful but find myself where I am now and would have been better off had I taken it to a second shop to cross check the spoke tension. I have to be sure I don't repeat the same mistake with my next wheel. Weighing as much as I do and carrying sometimes heavy loads using my bike every day etc I have to be more careful than most people.
Thanks for All!
Winfred
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