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Multi-tool recommendation?

Old 04-21-22, 04:39 AM
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Multi-tool recommendation?

I was riding with a friend yesterday when his seat came loose. When we were stopped taking a look at it someone passed us on the trail and asked if we needed help. I asked if he had a hex key, and he said did; it turned out to be a Topeak multi-tool. It fixed things up fine.

Now I want to get a multi-tool of some kind for my bag. Topeak seems fine, but there are many models to choose from. Any recommendations?
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Old 04-21-22, 06:09 AM
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Crank Brothers Multi-17
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Old 04-21-22, 06:28 AM
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Originally Posted by WT160 View Post
I was riding with a friend yesterday when his seat came loose. When we were stopped taking a look at it someone passed us on the trail and asked if we needed help. I asked if he had a hex key, and he said did; it turned out to be a Topeak multi-tool. It fixed things up fine.

Now I want to get a multi-tool of some kind for my bag. Topeak seems fine, but there are many models to choose from. Any recommendations?
I really like this Wolftooth 8 bit tool
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Old 04-21-22, 07:01 AM
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I've given up on multi-tools. Never seen or had one that didn't have tools on it I didn't need or had tools I needed but couldn't use because the tool design and bike configuration didn't mesh well.
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Old 04-21-22, 07:46 AM
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What I would like to see, are multi-tool kits that can be built to support a select bicycle prior to purchase.
I've yet to come across a compact multi tool kit that would support a 2022 Domane & nothing else.
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Old 04-21-22, 08:15 AM
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3,4,5,6,8mm allen wrenches and a philips is all you really need. And the 8 is only if you have one on your bike somewhere. 4, 5, 6 are almost universal. I had to buy an 8 at a hardware store when my crank bolt started coming loose on a ride. That one is in my bag with my much smaller multitool. If you think you need a chain tool or a spoke wrench carry those separately. I only carry those if I've just changed something but once I'm comfortable that everything is working I put them away.

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Old 04-21-22, 08:26 AM
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Originally Posted by Troul View Post
What I would like to see, are multi-tool kits that can be built to support a select bicycle prior to purchase.
I've yet to come across a compact multi tool kit that would support a 2022 Domane & nothing else.
Thank goodness for that!

To produce a multi-tool that would support one model and nothing else, you'd have to have at least one non-standard fastener that no other model used. Neato! Until one broke 3-5 years down the line, and you couldn't find another of those bolts. Or you lost that tool, and they were out of production.

OTOH, if your bike uses only standard fasteners, any multi-tool that fits those fasteners will work. Your mythical Silca multi-tool for a 2022 Domane fell out of the saddle bag you forgot to unzip after you fixed your flat? Pop down to the store, or look up on line, and buy a Park, or a Topeak, or a Lezyne, etc.

If you want to go to the opposite extreme, you can probably replace bolts on your current bike so you only need two or three hex wrenches. Buy a set and throw the rest away, or hit up your hardware store and buy 4, 5, and 6 mm hex wrenches, and you've probably saved a few ounces over most multi-tools.
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Old 04-21-22, 08:55 AM
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For occasional roadside use the lightest multi-tool I know of is Park's MT-1 "Dogbone" tool. It has 3,4,5,6 and 8mm hex keys, 8, 9 and 10mm box wrenches and a small flat blade screwdriver. It is about 4" long, weighs only 40 gms and sells for about $15. The 4 to 8mm hex keys are positioned at 90º to the handle so they have decent leverage. It and a small chain tools have fixed every roadside repair I've ever needed on my own or other rider's bikes. I once used the 8mm hex to reattach another rider's crank arm when the fixing bolt came loose. I couldn't get near the recommended torque but he was able to finish the ride.
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Old 04-21-22, 09:28 AM
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Originally Posted by pdlamb View Post
Thank goodness for that!

To produce a multi-tool that would support one model and nothing else, you'd have to have at least one non-standard fastener that no other model used. Neato! Until one broke 3-5 years down the line, and you couldn't find another of those bolts. Or you lost that tool, and they were out of production.

OTOH, if your bike uses only standard fasteners, any multi-tool that fits those fasteners will work. Your mythical Silca multi-tool for a 2022 Domane fell out of the saddle bag you forgot to unzip after you fixed your flat? Pop down to the store, or look up on line, and buy a Park, or a Topeak, or a Lezyne, etc.

If you want to go to the opposite extreme, you can probably replace bolts on your current bike so you only need two or three hex wrenches. Buy a set and throw the rest away, or hit up your hardware store and buy 4, 5, and 6 mm hex wrenches, and you've probably saved a few ounces over most multi-tools.
To produce a multi-tool that a customer selects which end pieces are loaded into the unit prior to cart check out shouldn't create too much of a mess. Now if the supplier keeps on buying end pieces that are rarely selected in hopes to sell a bunch in a customer optioned built kit, well that is on the supplier for not accounting to what sells & what does not.
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Old 04-21-22, 10:53 AM
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What I would like to see, are multi-tool kits that can be built to support a select bicycle prior to purchase.
I know from past posts several folks here have pretty much acomplished that. I went through my bike, listing all the various fasteners and considering how likely it would be to tighten or adjust. Then I put together what I needed just for that bike. More of a discrete tool kit than a multitool, I suppose, but actually smaller and lighter than the multitool I'd been carrying.



Fun fact no. 1: the Brompton folding bike has available a Brompton tool kit with the things one is most likely to need just for that bike, in a molded holder that fits into a secure recess on the bike.

Fun fact no. 2: many years ago, back when you were just a little tike, Shimano had a groupset that exclusively used a 6mm hex key for all fasteners and adjustments.
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Old 04-21-22, 02:20 PM
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I recall that Campy had a universal wrench also. It would fit all their bolts.

I also have a low profile ratchet set. The problem I see with it for bikes is that sometimes you need a long allen wrench to get at things. It was this one: Low Profile ratchet I've never carried it with me though.
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Old 04-21-22, 02:52 PM
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crank brother multi-tool 17 or 19

https://www.rei.com/product/746199/c...B&gclsrc=aw.ds
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Old 04-21-22, 03:14 PM
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I just went through my basket-o-parts and found the multi tool that I thought I had lost! It has 2-3-4-5-6, philips and flat and that's it. And that is all I need. They are long too so you can get some leverage when you need it and get into tight spaces. It's a Topeak, don't know which model. Also in there was my very long 8 which is overkill to carry, besides which I switched the problematic crank out a while ago already.

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Old 04-21-22, 03:25 PM
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Fix-it Sticks. Worth every penny and expandable from your toolbox.
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Old 04-21-22, 04:02 PM
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Originally Posted by tcs View Post
I know from past posts several folks here have pretty much acomplished that. I went through my bike, listing all the various fasteners and considering how likely it would be to tighten or adjust. Then I put together what I needed just for that bike. More of a discrete tool kit than a multitool, I suppose, but actually smaller and lighter than the multitool I'd been carrying.



Fun fact no. 1: the Brompton folding bike has available a Brompton tool kit with the things one is most likely to need just for that bike, in a molded holder that fits into a secure recess on the bike.

Fun fact no. 2: many years ago, back when you were just a little tike, Shimano had a groupset that exclusively used a 6mm hex key for all fasteners and adjustments.
I created something similar to that, I just added two other tools I've found to be very handy when a road-side repair is needed. The problem with the small high carbon pieces is that they tend to hate moister no matter how pregreased & tightly sealed the packaging is (Small packaging is essential) .
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Old 04-21-22, 04:20 PM
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I carry a Lezyne RAP-13 Multi-Tool and a Leatherman Rebar Multi-tool.



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Old 04-21-22, 06:02 PM
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Originally Posted by L134 View Post
I've given up on multi-tools. Never seen or had one that didn't have tools on it I didn't need or had tools I needed but couldn't use because the tool design and bike configuration didn't mesh well.
Agree 100%, I just take a few hex/ball L-wrenches, a small cross+straight screwdriver, a Mini Chain Brute and a few other items. Smaller and lighter than a multi-tool.

Quick test: mount a seat tube bottle cage with a multitool.
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Old 04-21-22, 06:24 PM
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I have park tool ib-2. Works ok. I actually prefer just allen keys but there kind of a pain to keep together.
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Old 04-21-22, 09:27 PM
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Topeak is indeed fine, like the Mini PT30 or the Alien X, no reason not to consider those; the other good ones are the Blackburn series like the Tradesman or the Wayside; and another is the Crankbrothers M20

You will need to know what tools you will need for most repairs on your bike, then find a multi tool that will do at least those repairs. Also, if you have hydro brakes you might want a multi tool that includes a disk pad spreader. Some of the multi tools are more for road bikes and some are more for MTB's, so consider that as well. And, if you use tubeless tires, some multi tools include a tire plug tool and even some tire plugs if you don't already have a tool in your saddle bag for that.

I happen to have a couple of Park tool MTB3 multi tools, but those are no longer made, and the new models they have did not impress me.

Topeak has come out with a portable torque wrench called the Nano Torqbar DX, it's rather pricey at nearly $100, but if you're concerned about over torquing on carbon fiber then that tool may be a godsend, but it is limited in what it can repair compared to the multi tools I mentioned above.
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Old 04-21-22, 09:33 PM
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Originally Posted by Digger Goreman View Post
Fix-it Sticks. Worth every penny and expandable from your toolbox.
Hate to say this but they are even better than the Cool Tool. I have several including a Bob Seals original.
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Old 04-22-22, 12:25 AM
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I like and use this one:
Topeak MINI 18+
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Old 04-22-22, 04:44 AM
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I went through my fasteners and found I mostly needed 3,4,5 and 6 hex sizes. I got a Topeak mini 6, which seems to cover it.

Thanks for the help!
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Old 04-22-22, 05:45 AM
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I only need 3, 4, 5 mm and carry them in titanium.
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Old 04-22-22, 07:39 AM
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Originally Posted by cyccommute View Post
Hate to say this but they are even better than the Cool Tool. I have several including a Bob Seals original.
Wow, amazing to hear that confession I see the occasional Cool Tool on fleabay at seemingly outrageous prices They are amazing in design and function, or so I imagine!

On the fixit sticks I went with the MTB (or so I think it is called) set. The first thing I did is to jet the plastic holder. While a neat design, it takes up too much room in the pouch. I keep the bits either in the sticks (very positive magnetic lock in) or in one of those little plastic cup row doo-hickeys I had in the toolbox. The best addition to the pouch is a Craftsman 1/4" mini thumb ratchet. It is thin, durable (within most reason) and often fits in where there is only room for the ratchet and a bit. The only (provisionally) useless piece is the Torx-25. Ofc I don't have that on my old MTB, but I keep it around in case someone else needs it. I have a pair of 2" magnetic extensions added, and a combo 8/10 mm box wrench (all the nuts on my bike accessories are either 8/10). The only thing missing, bit-wise, is/was an 8mm bit for my pedals. Funny how hard it was to find one, but blamazon had a 1/4" socket (mated to an 8mm bit) arrangement that takes little room, even with the hex-to-socket tool box extension needed. All of that fits relatively flatly into one side of the pouch.

On the other side of the pouch is their tire lever attachments (already used and as good, or better, than the Pedro's they replaced) as well as the super-clever chain breaker (designed to work with the fixit sticks, ofc). I added a pair of Craftsman mini diagonal pliers (mostly for cutting tie wraps and light duty) and a pair of mini-, curved, forceps for FOD tire removal. My final addition will be a pair of mini-pliers (languishing somewhere in the American side of the supply chain right now) because you occasionally need to grip something. Two tubes and a Rema patch kit sit under the saddle, with the tool pouch, and I haven't met a need they couldn't handle yet. Any greater need is most likely out of my capabilities and require transportation to the bike shop

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Old 04-22-22, 08:40 AM
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Originally Posted by Digger Goreman View Post
Wow, amazing to hear that confession I see the occasional Cool Tool on fleabay at seemingly outrageous prices They are amazing in design and function, or so I imagine!
Don’t get me wrong. For the era (mid 80s to about 2015), there was no better multitool around. It fits your hand unlike most multitools. The features it has…adjustable wrench, and bottom bracket socket as well as the headset and bottom bracket add-ons…just aren’t all that useful today. Newer bikes can be taken apart with just a 5mm allen wrench and maybe a T25 torx.

I’d give my left arm for a titanium version.

On the fixit sticks I went with the MTB (or so I think it is called) set. The first thing I did is to jet the plastic holder. While a neat design, it takes up too much room in the pouch. I keep the bits either in the sticks (very positive magnetic lock in) or in one of those little plastic cup row doo-hickeys I had in the toolbox. The best addition to the pouch is a Craftsman 1/4" mini thumb ratchet. It is thin, durable (within most reason) and often fits in where there is only room for the ratchet and a bit. The only (provisionally) useless piece is the Torx-25. Ofc I don't have that on my old MTB, but I keep it around in case someone else needs it. I have a pair of 2" magnetic extensions added, and a combo 8/10 mm box wrench (all the nuts on my bike accessories are either 8/10). The only thing missing, bit-wise, is/was an 8mm bit for my pedals. Funny how hard it was to find one, but blamazon had a 1/4" socket (mated to an 8mm bit) arrangement that takes little room, even with the hex-to-socket tool box extension needed. All of that fits relatively flatly into one side of the pouch.
My kit is a little older and came with a bit case that I find really useful.
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