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Easily Achieving 125 PSI - My Approach/Experience

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Easily Achieving 125 PSI - My Approach/Experience

Old 06-19-22, 06:31 PM
  #26  
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Originally Posted by Jeff Neese View Post
Considering that 123 psi is printed right on the side of the tire, I would hardly call it "ridiculous".
It is ridiculous, unless you prefer is a harsh ride with higher rolling resistance.

Don't confuse max psi with optimal psi.
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Old 06-19-22, 06:33 PM
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Originally Posted by Jeff Neese View Post
Considering that 123 psi is printed right on the side of the tire, I would hardly call it "ridiculous". By the time I top them off again, they're usually around 95-100 psi.

The OP was asking which pumps can handle that pressure, not whether anyone approves of his choice of tire or tire pressure.
They think that’s just a number to avoid legal liability.
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Old 06-19-22, 07:06 PM
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Originally Posted by Koyote View Post
It is ridiculous, unless you prefer is a harsh ride with higher rolling resistance.

Don't confuse max psi with optimal psi.
The bicycle in question is a Reynolds 531 frame, ridden only on smooth roads. There's no such thing as a harsh ride with this bike. Regarding rolling resistance, there are more variables to consider but in general, higher is better. (Smaller contact patch). Here's an interesting article, among many others. Again though, when you're talking about rolling resistance there are a lot of variables including width of the tire, the tire construction itself, and of course the smoothness of the road surface.

Resistance is futile: How tire pressure and width affect rolling resistance
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Old 06-19-22, 07:44 PM
  #29  
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Originally Posted by Jeff Neese View Post
The bicycle in question is a Reynolds 531 frame, ridden only on smooth roads. There's no such thing as a harsh ride with this bike. Regarding rolling resistance, there are more variables to consider but in general, higher is better. (Smaller contact patch). Here's an interesting article, among many others. Again though, when you're talking about rolling resistance there are a lot of variables including width of the tire, the tire construction itself, and of course the smoothness of the road surface.

Resistance is futile: How tire pressure and width affect rolling resistance
From your article: "If you're running 120psi or more, you're almost certainly losing on the balance sheet."

If you think the size of the contact patch is what determines rolling resistance, you'd better rage hard against the dying of the tubed clincher, because tubeless (especially hookless) doesn't support skinny high-pressure setups very well...
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Old 06-19-22, 07:54 PM
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Originally Posted by ThermionicScott View Post
you'd better rage hard against the dying of the tubed clincher, because tubeless (especially hookless) doesn't support skinny high-pressure setups very well...
Huh…the newer stuff doesn’t do skinny high pressure…and all the new research says skinny high pressure is bad? What a neat coincidence!

Anyway, that’s why I bought a second pair of Veloflexes when I could. Probably should get some more latex tubes.

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Old 06-19-22, 08:10 PM
  #31  
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Originally Posted by Jeff Neese View Post
The bicycle in question is a Reynolds 531 frame, ridden only on smooth roads. There's no such thing as a harsh ride with this bike. Regarding rolling resistance, there are more variables to consider but in general, higher is better. (Smaller contact patch). Here's an interesting article, among many others. Again though, when you're talking about rolling resistance there are a lot of variables including width of the tire, the tire construction itself, and of course the smoothness of the road surface.

Resistance is futile: How tire pressure and width affect rolling resistance
Apparently you've not read the article; here are a couple quotes:

Using roller data from Al Morrison and on-road data from Tom Anhalt, you can see a clear breakpoint in the graph where rolling resistance appears to increase sharply (around 115psi – and note that this was a relatively smooth road). Rougher roads result in a breakpoint at significantly lower pressures.

The graph below shows how much worse things get with rough pavement (the red line) – with the fastest setup at a low 60psi.

​​​​​​If you're running 120psi or more, you're almost certainly losing on the balance sheet.



Got any more articles that refute your own argument?
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Old 06-19-22, 08:16 PM
  #32  
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Originally Posted by Koyote View Post
Apparently you've not read the article; here are a couple quotes:

Using roller data from Al Morrison and on-road data from Tom Anhalt, you can see a clear breakpoint in the graph where rolling resistance appears to increase sharply (around 115psi – and note that this was a relatively smooth road). Rougher roads result in a breakpoint at significantly lower pressures.

The graph below shows how much worse things get with rough pavement (the red line) – with the fastest setup at a low 60psi.

​​​​​​If you're running 120psi or more, you're almost certainly losing on the balance sheet.
It’s true. At 140 psi I can barely pedal the bike. Feels like my wheels are rolling through a pool of molasses.

Last edited by smd4; 06-19-22 at 08:22 PM.
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Old 06-19-22, 08:29 PM
  #33  
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If people aren't literally participating in races, it obviously doesn't matter if they're losing a bit of speed by using inordinately high pressure for the conditions they encounter. Rock-hard tires can be fun to ride.
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Old 06-19-22, 08:48 PM
  #34  
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Originally Posted by Trakhak View Post
If people aren't literally participating in races, it obviously doesn't matter if they're losing a bit of speed by using inordinately high pressure for the conditions they encounter. Rock-hard tires can be fun to ride.
Or not if they ride the roads that I do. Where I live wider tires at much lower pressure are not only more comfortable, they are also faster. Baltimore does not have the same climate we have here where winter temperatures can vary 25 or more degrees centigrade in the space of 4-5 hours in the winter

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Old 06-19-22, 10:44 PM
  #35  
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Originally Posted by smd4 View Post
Just can’t help yourself, can you?

By “pinion,” I assume you mean “opinion.”

Went riding this afternoon with my son. He was riding his 29-er with 65 psi. He kicked my butt! But then I deflated my tires completely and smoked him.
No, one of my missions in life is trying to eliminate stupidity.
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Old 06-19-22, 10:59 PM
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Originally Posted by cxwrench View Post
No, one of my missions in life is trying to eliminate stupidity.
a sisyphean task if there ever was one! keep up the good fight....
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Old 06-20-22, 03:35 AM
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Originally Posted by alcjphil View Post
Or not if they ride the roads that I do. Where I live wider tires at much lower pressure are not only more comfortable, they are also faster. Baltimore does not have the same climate we have here where winter temperatures can vary 25 or more degrees centigrade in the space of 4-5 hours in the winter
I once posted the following in a thread on a musician's forum that discussed what cover songs people were and were not willing to play in bands (e.g., Mustang Sally):

"All the professional musicians I've played with brought their pro game to every song, whatever it was. All the mediocre musicians have been bitterly vehement about the many songs they regard as beneath them to play."

The first reply I received, in its entirety:

"You don't know me!"
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Old 06-20-22, 06:35 AM
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Originally Posted by cxwrench View Post
No, one of my missions in life is trying to eliminate stupidity.
Better start by looking in the mirror.

I know lots of cyclists have the reputation of being absolute a-holes. Heck, I can be one myself sometimes. But man, the a-hole-ness just oozes out of you like pus from an open sore.

You are a bitter, bitter person.

Last edited by smd4; 06-20-22 at 06:40 AM.
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Old 06-20-22, 06:48 AM
  #39  
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Originally Posted by Jeff Neese View Post
I used a compressor for the longest time, but finally last year bought one of these. It easily hits 125 PSI, which is what I run in my Continental GP5000 700x25C. The double-sided flip lock works very well, and it works equally as well on my Schrader and Presta wheels. No adapters or any fiddling around at all. I never turn the compressor on any more - this is just so much quicker and easier. The positive reviews are accurate - this is a great pump at a very reasonable price. Highly recommended.

Topeak Joe Blow Sport III High Pressure Floor Pump
Thanks for posting , doesn't look like Topeak does online retail but Amazon has several of their models - both a compressor and floor pump have their place
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Old 06-20-22, 07:35 AM
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Originally Posted by blinky View Post
Thanks for posting , doesn't look like Topeak does online retail but Amazon has several of their models - both a compressor and floor pump have their place
I bought mine from Amazon, the link I shared. I agree a compressor is always good to have. I just find myself not using it for bicycles any more. By the time I turn on the compressor and it comes up to pressure, not to mention threading adapters onto the valve stems to fit the chuck, I can top off tires on two bicycles and be on the road. It's just quicker and easier and I wish I had bought this pump years ago. I actually top off my tires more frequently now because it's so much less involved.
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Old 06-20-22, 10:36 AM
  #41  
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Originally Posted by Jeff Neese View Post
I bought mine from Amazon, the link I shared. I agree a compressor is always good to have. I just find myself not using it for bicycles any more. By the time I turn on the compressor and it comes up to pressure, not to mention threading adapters onto the valve stems to fit the chuck, I can top off tires on two bicycles and be on the road. It's just quicker and easier and I wish I had bought this pump years ago. I actually top off my tires more frequently now because it's so much less involved.
I agree , the model you linked to got very good reviews and the price is nice - between the cars and bikes , they'll both get enough use - thanks again !!
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Old 06-20-22, 11:51 AM
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Originally Posted by Jeff Neese View Post
I bought mine from Amazon, the link I shared. I agree a compressor is always good to have. I just find myself not using it for bicycles any more. By the time I turn on the compressor and it comes up to pressure, not to mention threading adapters onto the valve stems to fit the chuck, I can top off tires on two bicycles and be on the road. It's just quicker and easier and I wish I had bought this pump years ago. I actually top off my tires more frequently now because it's so much less involved.
most times I use a DeWalt battery powered portable inflator instead of a compressor or floor pump

also inflate our car tires with it ; quick - efficient - accurate

also use DeWalt battery powered impact guns (instead of pneumatic) - small / compact model weighs around 3.5 lbs and can remove almost any bolt / wheel lug nuts; larger model still relatively small / compact at around 6 lbs and has great power (700/1200 ft lbs)

I'm sure there are a number of other available portable inflators - Milwaukee etc - if you already have the batteries a compatible portable inflator could be a nice addition

We also have a smaller portable Worx inflator - but have not used it yet

Last edited by t2p; 06-20-22 at 12:46 PM.
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Old 06-20-22, 01:50 PM
  #43  
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Originally Posted by t2p View Post



most times I use a DeWalt battery powered portable inflator instead of a compressor or floor pump

also inflate our car tires with it ; quick - efficient - accurate

also use DeWalt battery powered impact guns (instead of pneumatic) - small / compact model weighs around 3.5 lbs and can remove almost any bolt / wheel lug nuts; larger model still relatively small / compact at around 6 lbs and has great power (700/1200 ft lbs)

I'm sure there are a number of other available portable inflators - Milwaukee etc - if you already have the batteries a compatible portable inflator could be a nice addition

We also have a smaller portable Worx inflator - but have not used it yet
I have a Craftsman hand held battery powered inflator that I've used for the golf cart , wheelbarrow, & garden hose caddy but takes too long for the cars - however the DeWalt looks pretty good but If I'm not careful I could start collecting different types of inflators - right now the compressor can handle everything but I'm getting that Topeak floor pump ,and should be Ok for awhile .
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Old 06-20-22, 01:52 PM
  #44  
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Originally Posted by smd4 View Post
Better start by looking in the mirror.

I know lots of cyclists have the reputation of being absolute a-holes. Heck, I can be one myself sometimes. But man, the a-hole-ness just oozes out of you like pus from an open sore.

You are a bitter, bitter person.
I legit LOL'd on this comment. My thoughts on PSI ? Meh ....run what ya want if it suits you. The OP was asking about pumps that would get his tires pumped up to high pressure easily...not if people approved of his PSI choices. FWIW I run close to 100 on m clinchers or else I start getting flats. I run about 70ish or whatever my thumb test tells me is OK on my 32c tubeless.

I swear this is worse than an oil thread on my Ducati forum.
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Old 06-20-22, 03:11 PM
  #45  
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Originally Posted by smd4 View Post
Better start by looking in the mirror.

I know lots of cyclists have the reputation of being absolute a-holes. Heck, I can be one myself sometimes. But man, the a-hole-ness just oozes out of you like pus from an open sore.

You are a bitter, bitter person.
I may be an a-hole but I'm not bitter at all. You're on an online forum. You can post whatever you want about tire pressure and I'm able to post my opinion about how stupid I may think it is. Get over it.
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Old 06-20-22, 03:54 PM
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Fine. Then it's my opinion that you're a bitter, bitter person, who probably doesn't even ride a bike. Deal with it.

Last edited by smd4; 06-20-22 at 03:58 PM.
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Old 06-21-22, 10:30 AM
  #47  
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It's not my opinion but fact that the OP was soliciting comments and advice on how to achieve these super high pressures. If the gist of the thread was "what do you think of the pressures I am running, do you rhink this is a good pressure etc " then by all means, tell him its dumb and ridiculous and yadda yadda yadda.

He didn't ask

This being bike forums many people subtly or not so subtly imply he is an idiot and everyone proceeds to bag on his pressures and approach to achieving them.


I used to run 120 psi on my 23mm tires all the time. That's what the tire called for and if I ran 80 or 90 psi I got hella pinch flats. I run 80 or less on my Domane because that's what it called for. When I check pressure on my sport bike I do what the sidewall says unless experience says go a pound or two in either direction.

Kindly offering advice and stating your case is the way to behave. Being that this is the internet means I can be a ****** is no way to go through life.
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Old 06-21-22, 11:02 AM
  #48  
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Originally Posted by Rdmonster69 View Post
I legit LOL'd on this comment. My thoughts on PSI ? Meh ....run what ya want if it suits you. The OP was asking about pumps that would get his tires pumped up to high pressure easily...not if people approved of his PSI choices. FWIW I run close to 100 on m clinchers or else I start getting flats. I run about 70ish or whatever my thumb test tells me is OK on my 32c tubeless.

I swear this is worse than an oil thread on my Ducati forum.
oil threads can be the best (worst) - at times worse than religion and politics !
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Old 06-21-22, 11:07 AM
  #49  
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Originally Posted by Rdmonster69 View Post
It's not my opinion but fact that the OP was soliciting comments and advice on how to achieve these super high pressures. If the gist of the thread was "what do you think of the pressures I am running, do you rhink this is a good pressure etc " then by all means, tell him its dumb and ridiculous and yadda yadda yadda.

He didn't ask

This being bike forums many people subtly or not so subtly imply he is an idiot and everyone proceeds to bag on his pressures and approach to achieving them.


I used to run 120 psi on my 23mm tires all the time. That's what the tire called for and if I ran 80 or 90 psi I got hella pinch flats. I run 80 or less on my Domane because that's what it called for. When I check pressure on my sport bike I do what the sidewall says unless experience says go a pound or two in either direction.

Kindly offering advice and stating your case is the way to behave. Being that this is the internet means I can be a ****** is no way to go through life.
if rider is decent size - anywhere around 200lbs or so - and riding 20's or 23's with under 100 psi and especially if under 90 psi - pinch flat is almost inevitable

book it - gonna happen

maybe if the roads are relatively smooth / no potholes / lips / railroad track crossings ... might be able to get away with it
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Old 06-21-22, 11:09 AM
  #50  
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Back on topic:
My older Park Tool PFP-3 is easy to pump to 100 psi (I run 72 front, 80 rear on my 28mm tires. Fast and comfortable too.) It's noticeably easier to push down the handle above 50 psi than some of the other rider's pumps that I've used. And I've seen small riders really struggle with their floor pump, not enough weight pressing down on the handle, I guess.

Just like mini pumps to carry on rides, the barrel diameter helps determine how easy it is to get high pressures. Narrow = lower volume = easier high pressures.
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