Go Back  Bike Forums > Bike Forums > Bicycle Mechanics
Reload this Page >

Bike tool kit?

Notices
Bicycle Mechanics Broken bottom bracket? Tacoed wheel? If you're having problems with your bicycle, or just need help fixing a flat, drop in here for the latest on bicycle mechanics & bicycle maintenance.

Bike tool kit?

Old 07-01-22, 08:57 PM
  #26  
veganbikes
Clark W. Griswold
 
Join Date: Mar 2014
Location: ,location, location
Posts: 10,038

Bikes: Foundry Chilkoot Ti W/Ultegra Di2, Salsa Timberjack Ti, Cinelli Mash Work RandoCross Fun Time Machine, 1x9 XT Parts Hybrid, Co-Motion Cascadia, Specialized Langster, Phil Wood Apple VeloXS Frame (w/DA 7400), R+M Supercharger2 Rohloff, Habanero Ti 26

Mentioned: 42 Post(s)
Tagged: 0 Thread(s)
Quoted: 2913 Post(s)
Liked 2,110 Times in 1,397 Posts
Originally Posted by smd4 View Post
I guess I was referring to box/open end wrenches and such. Screw drivers and hex wrenches…absolutely.
Ok that is more reasonable.
veganbikes is offline  
Old 07-02-22, 01:10 AM
  #27  
Troul 
:D
 
Troul's Avatar
 
Join Date: Oct 2013
Location: Mich
Posts: 5,537

Bikes: RSO E-tire dropper fixie brifter

Mentioned: 0 Post(s)
Tagged: 0 Thread(s)
Quoted: 6 Post(s)
Liked 1,844 Times in 1,235 Posts
even if the tool is only used once in a while, it'd make sense to shell out the bucks for a quality tool. It's that one time that a tool is needed that you dont want to turn a quick job into a multi day project requiring more creative tooling.
__________________
-Oh Hey!
Troul is offline  
Old 07-05-22, 08:59 AM
  #28  
mlau
Senior Member
Thread Starter
 
Join Date: Apr 2008
Location: Alameda
Posts: 434

Bikes: Xootr Swift

Mentioned: 2 Post(s)
Tagged: 0 Thread(s)
Quoted: 124 Post(s)
Liked 46 Times in 36 Posts
Originally Posted by smd4 View Post
I'll preface this by saying you may already have a lot of these tools in your home tool box (and I see that you do from the post above). Anyway...

--Set of metric open/box end wrenches up to 17mm;
--12" adjustable ("Crescent") wrench;
--Ball-peen hammer;
--Metal shop ruler (to measure chain stretch, etc.);
--Needle-nose pliers (to grab the cable when adjusting derailleur cable tension);
--JIS (Japanese) Phillips head screwdriver, probably No. 2 will cover you in most instances;
--Hex/Allen Tri-wrench in 4, 5, 6 mm;
--Socket Tri-wrench in 8, 9, 10 mm;
--Torx Tri-wrench (I have one but don't use it, because I don't have any Torx fasteners);
--Pedal Wrench (I have an older (Verma?) model that has both 15mm and 1/2" at either end);
--Set of good quality cone wrenches (I use Park);
--High-quality spoke wrench to fit your spoke nipples. Park makes these. Get the kind that looks like a hot-air-balloon with rubber grip. Don't cheap out on this tool!;
--Headset wrench specific to your headset if you use one. Park makes these as well;
--Chain Whip;
--Cassette lockring tool depending on cassette manufacturer (This will be used in conjunction with your chain whip and adjustable wrench);
--Bottom-bracket tools, depending on what you're using and the era;
--Fourth hand (Hozan makes an excellent one);
--Quality bike-cable-specific cable cutters (I use a discontinued Shimano version but the newer Park one seems quite capable);
--Metric Allen key set (the "L" shaped ones);
--Chain Tool (type depending on what you use--rivets, quick links, etc.);
--Tools specific to your bike--I need an extra long 6mm Allen key for my stem and a 8mm Allen for my cranks. I also have a specific tool for my chainring bolts and crank dust caps, and one to adjust my pedal bearings;
--Good quality oil (your choice; I use Tri-Flow);
--Good quality grease (your choice; I use Shimano Special Grease. Phil is good too);
--Good quality floor pump including good-quality chuck for your particular valves (I use a Silca Pista Plus with Hiro chuck for Presta valves);
--Tire valve core tool (I think these would be used if you are tubeless and need to remove the valve core);
--Decent floor stand if your bike can be lifted into one;

Fun tools but completely unnecessary: Angle gauge; digital bike (expensive) or luggage (cheap) scale.

This list is what I can think of off the top of my head, but should be a good start for most home shops. YMMV. There are of course very specialized tools like dropout alignment tools, headset cup and race removers/installers, etc. These can be pricy and not used very often, but many can be fabricated at home. I may add to this list as I think of things.

This is SUPER useful.

I've learned to assume that I don't know stuff (sorta a reverse Dunning Kreuger complex).
Thanks for helping out a bike enthusiast, who is a total noob at maintenece.
mlau is offline  
Likes For mlau:
Old 07-05-22, 09:03 AM
  #29  
mlau
Senior Member
Thread Starter
 
Join Date: Apr 2008
Location: Alameda
Posts: 434

Bikes: Xootr Swift

Mentioned: 2 Post(s)
Tagged: 0 Thread(s)
Quoted: 124 Post(s)
Liked 46 Times in 36 Posts
Originally Posted by sjanzeir View Post
Wise people once told me to buy the quality tools that I specifically need for the bikes I have as and when I needed them. That advice has never let me down. I say take an inventory of the components of your bikes and match your toolkit accordingly. And yeah, buy the quality stuff: Park Tool (of course,) Pedro's (no-nonsense,) IceToolz (a bit underappreciated,) Uniche (look them up; their stepless tool is really great and they make a bunch of other great stuff.)

FWIW, I don't know enough to know which companies are "quality" for BIke tools.
For instance, I was agonizing over what 4th hand (cable puller) tool to get, and ended up with a Park Tool.
For anything that's not bike specific, I love Knipex or Wera/Wiha.

FWIW, I'm more familiar with woodworking stuff, as I used to (hackishly) build acoustic guitars.
mlau is offline  
Old 07-05-22, 09:32 AM
  #30  
smd4
Senior Member
 
Join Date: Dec 2020
Location: Wake Forest, NC
Posts: 1,449

Bikes: 1989 Cinelli Super Corsa

Mentioned: 4 Post(s)
Tagged: 0 Thread(s)
Quoted: 828 Post(s)
Liked 607 Times in 392 Posts
Originally Posted by mlau View Post
FWIW, I don't know enough to know which companies are "quality" for BIke tools.
For instance, I was agonizing over what 4th hand (cable puller) tool to get, and ended up with a Park Tool.
I found the Park fourth hand (and the copy-cat Pedro's) to be difficult to use at best. They use thinner metal, which makes grabbing the cable more difficult. The Hozan is identical to the tool we used in the shop in the late 1980s (and for some reason, I thought it was Park-branded back then as well--at least I remember blue rubber hand grips).
smd4 is offline  
Old 07-06-22, 03:41 AM
  #31  
Troul 
:D
 
Troul's Avatar
 
Join Date: Oct 2013
Location: Mich
Posts: 5,537

Bikes: RSO E-tire dropper fixie brifter

Mentioned: 0 Post(s)
Tagged: 0 Thread(s)
Quoted: 6 Post(s)
Liked 1,844 Times in 1,235 Posts
Originally Posted by mlau View Post
FWIW, I don't know enough to know which companies are "quality" for BIke tools.
For instance, I was agonizing over what 4th hand (cable puller) tool to get, and ended up with a Park Tool.
For anything that's not bike specific, I love Knipex or Wera/Wiha.

FWIW, I'm more familiar with woodworking stuff, as I used to (hackishly) build acoustic guitars.
Knipex & Wiha let me down, both with durability & cost. Ended up replacing those failures with Cobalt. My vintage Crapsmen is holding up, but as they wear out or crack, I roll the dice with what the tool truck has for replacement.
__________________
-Oh Hey!
Troul is offline  
Old 07-06-22, 04:23 AM
  #32  
bwilli88 
Not lost wanderer.
 
bwilli88's Avatar
 
Join Date: Jan 2013
Location: Kampong Cham, Cambodia but I have quite a few in Lancaster, PA
Posts: 2,954

Bikes: Bikes in USA; 73 Raleigh SuperCourse dingle speed, 72 Raleigh GranSport SS, 72 Geoffry Butler, 81 Centurion Pro-Tour, 82 Raleigh RRA.

Mentioned: 67 Post(s)
Tagged: 0 Thread(s)
Quoted: 755 Post(s)
Liked 602 Times in 338 Posts
While I do buy good tools, I do limit the purchase of top notch tools are typically to those that are bike related.
I typically use a JIS Philips for bike screws.
I have 5 or 6 Allen wrenches of each size and have them all over the shop, I also have a set of 4,5, & 6mm Allen wrenches in a tool bag on every bike I have
I also have multiple box and open end wrenches, typically 3 or 4 sets of 8, 9, & 10mm spread all over the shop.
A previous poster stated a full set of box and open end wrenches up to 17mm. Do not forget that most BB and cassette removal tools use either a 22mm or 24mm wrench, so go bigger.
I also have a couple of hammers, a ball peen and also a cross peen.
I also have a couple of vise grips and a few Knipex pliers
Diagonal cutters, slip joint pliers and other general tools are nice to have around.
A chain stretch gauge is nice to have.
Do not waste your time putting all your tools in fancy fitted cases, there is not enough room.
I have my tools in a 7 drawer tool chest.
I also have a travel set in a large 18" tool bag.
__________________
Cambodia bikes, 83 Gazelle Opafiets, A Klunker, Maxwell All-road, Bridgestone SRAM 2 speed, 2012 Fuji Stratos.

Last edited by bwilli88; 07-07-22 at 08:25 AM.
bwilli88 is offline  
Likes For bwilli88:
Old 07-06-22, 09:09 AM
  #33  
smd4
Senior Member
 
Join Date: Dec 2020
Location: Wake Forest, NC
Posts: 1,449

Bikes: 1989 Cinelli Super Corsa

Mentioned: 4 Post(s)
Tagged: 0 Thread(s)
Quoted: 828 Post(s)
Liked 607 Times in 392 Posts
Vice grips is a good recommendation. Another general purpose tool that hasn't been mentioned yet: Simple scissors. Useful for trimming bar tape, etc. Kitchen shears my be a little more robust.
smd4 is offline  
Likes For smd4:
Old 07-06-22, 09:38 AM
  #34  
mlau
Senior Member
Thread Starter
 
Join Date: Apr 2008
Location: Alameda
Posts: 434

Bikes: Xootr Swift

Mentioned: 2 Post(s)
Tagged: 0 Thread(s)
Quoted: 124 Post(s)
Liked 46 Times in 36 Posts
Originally Posted by smd4 View Post
I found the Park fourth hand (and the copy-cat Pedro's) to be difficult to use at best. They use thinner metal, which makes grabbing the cable more difficult. The Hozan is identical to the tool we used in the shop in the late 1980s (and for some reason, I thought it was Park-branded back then as well--at least I remember blue rubber hand grips).
Thanks for the tip.

I may return it and get the Hozan
mlau is offline  
Old 07-06-22, 09:43 AM
  #35  
smd4
Senior Member
 
Join Date: Dec 2020
Location: Wake Forest, NC
Posts: 1,449

Bikes: 1989 Cinelli Super Corsa

Mentioned: 4 Post(s)
Tagged: 0 Thread(s)
Quoted: 828 Post(s)
Liked 607 Times in 392 Posts
Originally Posted by mlau View Post
Thanks for the tip.

I may return it and get the Hozan
The Hozan construction is noticeably thicker and doesn't use unnecessary gimmicks like the ratchet.
smd4 is offline  

Posting Rules
You may not post new threads
You may not post replies
You may not post attachments
You may not edit your posts

BB code is On
Smilies are On
[IMG] code is On
HTML code is Off


Thread Tools
Search this Thread

Contact Us - Archive - Advertising - Cookie Policy - Privacy Statement - Terms of Service - Do Not Sell My Personal Information -

Copyright © 2021 MH Sub I, LLC dba Internet Brands. All rights reserved. Use of this site indicates your consent to the Terms of Use.