Go Back  Bike Forums > Bike Forums > Bicycle Mechanics
Reload this Page >

Pedal Removal.

Notices
Bicycle Mechanics Broken bottom bracket? Tacoed wheel? If you're having problems with your bicycle, or just need help fixing a flat, drop in here for the latest on bicycle mechanics & bicycle maintenance.

Pedal Removal.

Old 11-23-22, 06:19 AM
  #1  
saulgoldie
Newbie
Thread Starter
 
Join Date: Aug 2022
Posts: 17
Mentioned: 0 Post(s)
Tagged: 0 Thread(s)
Quoted: 11 Post(s)
Liked 5 Times in 2 Posts
Pedal Removal.

I'm trying to remove the pedals on an older Nishiki, circa...maybe mid 80s. There is an allen key, probly a 6mm, on the inside. I tried to remove the pedals on the outside using a proper 15mm thin blade long wrench. Probly 14inches long. So I had plenty of torque. I was trying to remove them in the correct direction. Oh, and I squirted some WD on the threads and tried a while later, and still nothing. I'm not sure if I would have much torque on a little ole 6mm allen key.

Is it possible that the allen key is some sort of lock that needs to be released first? I'd like to remove them myself. But it is seeming 9impossible.

My next step is to take it to a shop. But I don't know what they might do that I have not already done.

Thanks in advance for any help.

Saul
saulgoldie is offline  
Old 11-23-22, 06:35 AM
  #2  
smd4
Senior Member
 
Join Date: Dec 2020
Location: Wake Forest, NC
Posts: 2,093

Bikes: 1989 Cinelli Supercorsa

Mentioned: 5 Post(s)
Tagged: 0 Thread(s)
Quoted: 1231 Post(s)
Liked 907 Times in 592 Posts
Originally Posted by saulgoldie View Post

Is it possible that the allen key is some sort of lock that needs to be released first?
No, there isn’t an extra lock.
smd4 is online now  
Old 11-23-22, 06:39 AM
  #3  
andrewclaus
Senior Member
 
Join Date: Feb 2012
Location: Golden, CO and Tucson, AZ
Posts: 2,585

Bikes: 2016 Fuji Tread, 1983 Trek 520

Mentioned: 13 Post(s)
Tagged: 0 Thread(s)
Quoted: 594 Post(s)
Liked 475 Times in 312 Posts
It's just really stuck. The recess Allen head is just an option, not a lock. WD-40 is not a good penetrant. You could try penetrating oil. More likely it's a matter of getting enough torque with the tool. Try placing the crank arm forward, find the wrench position pointing the wrench handle to the rear, as close to aligned with the crank as possible, put one hand on the pedal, one on the wrench, and push down. This works for opposite threads on both sides. You might need a bigger wrench if you don't have a pro model.
andrewclaus is offline  
Old 11-23-22, 07:06 AM
  #4  
bboy314
Full Member
 
bboy314's Avatar
 
Join Date: Dec 2008
Location: Pioneer Valley
Posts: 425
Mentioned: 0 Post(s)
Tagged: 0 Thread(s)
Quoted: 111 Post(s)
Liked 188 Times in 107 Posts
Also keep in mind that the left pedal is reverse threaded.
bboy314 is offline  
Old 11-23-22, 08:41 AM
  #5  
rumrunn6
Senior Member
 
rumrunn6's Avatar
 
Join Date: Jul 2008
Location: 25 miles northwest of Boston
Posts: 28,042

Bikes: Bottecchia Sprint, GT Timberline 29r, Trek FX Alpha 7.0

Mentioned: 109 Post(s)
Tagged: 0 Thread(s)
Quoted: 4789 Post(s)
Liked 2,602 Times in 1,763 Posts
wear gloves
rumrunn6 is offline  
Likes For rumrunn6:
Old 11-23-22, 08:56 AM
  #6  
Bean Counter
Junior Member
 
Join Date: Jan 2003
Location: Fort Collins, CO
Posts: 183

Bikes: 04 Lemond Buenos Aires, 2010 Cannondale

Mentioned: 0 Post(s)
Tagged: 0 Thread(s)
Quoted: 5 Post(s)
Liked 2 Times in 1 Post
Put a piece of pipe over the end of wrench for extra leverage. Use your foot on it for more force. Don't forget to yell, "Ouch," when your leg hits something unintended.
__________________
“He's all over his machine” - Phil Liggett
Bean Counter is offline  
Likes For Bean Counter:
Old 11-23-22, 09:10 AM
  #7  
Anicius
Newbie
 
Join Date: Nov 2022
Posts: 3
Mentioned: 0 Post(s)
Tagged: 0 Thread(s)
Quoted: 0 Post(s)
Likes: 0
Liked 2 Times in 2 Posts
I'd think about using a penetrating oil along with some moderate heat. Even a hair dryer. I'd do three or four circuits a few hours apart. Oil, heat, removal attempt. I've removed freewheels that way. A bit of heat will expand the parts, including the gap between the threads, and it seems to improve the penetrant's effect. (Assuming alloy expands more than a steel pedal spindle.)

Last edited by Anicius; 11-23-22 at 09:15 AM.
Anicius is offline  
Old 11-23-22, 10:43 AM
  #8  
Steve B.
Senior Member
 
Join Date: Jul 2007
Location: South shore, L.I., NY
Posts: 5,896

Bikes: Flyxii FR322, Cannondale Topstone, Miyata City Liner, Specialized Chisel, Specialized Epic Evo

Mentioned: 18 Post(s)
Tagged: 0 Thread(s)
Quoted: 2524 Post(s)
Liked 1,298 Times in 747 Posts
On one stuck pedal set I was using the Park 15mm tool that is also a headset wrench. As I would not put a cheater pipe over the end of that, I ended up buying a Park PW3 wrench that allowed a cheater pipe off the end. A LOT of pressure eventually got the pedals free.
Steve B. is offline  
Old 11-23-22, 10:54 AM
  #9  
veganbikes
Clark W. Griswold
 
Join Date: Mar 2014
Location: ,location, location
Posts: 10,661

Bikes: Foundry Chilkoot Ti W/Ultegra Di2, Salsa Timberjack Ti, Cinelli Mash Work RandoCross Fun Time Machine, 1x9 XT Parts Hybrid, Co-Motion Cascadia, Specialized Langster, Phil Wood Apple VeloXS Frame (w/DA 7400), R+M Supercharger2 Rohloff, Habanero Ti 26

Mentioned: 46 Post(s)
Tagged: 0 Thread(s)
Quoted: 3168 Post(s)
Liked 2,432 Times in 1,616 Posts
Make sure you are shifted into the bigger ring on the bike (you will all thank me later). Make sure you are turning the tool in the correct direction and I would use a pedal wrench which is designed for the purpose and also penetrating oil as other have suggested. Some heat could help depending on the metals in question. If you are unsure I would just go to the shop because it can be quite a lot of work to remove stuck pedals and I hate doing it if I can avoid it, we have had to use harsh chemicals before to remove pedals and it is not fun. If you are 100% positive and would be a large sum of money on which way the pedal removes from the backside using that 6mm wrench you could use an impact gun and that can help sometimes but I don't recommend it if unsure at all and you don't have experience with power tools. I had a mechanic late last year who broke 3 wrenches and I said lets go to the Impact and the bolt was out in seconds it is that quick jolt of extreme power and torque that got it free. It is not something I recommend on bicycles often if it all unless sure but it can come to the rescue with stuck stuff that is threaded.
veganbikes is offline  
Old 11-23-22, 06:24 PM
  #10  
JohnDThompson 
Old fart
 
JohnDThompson's Avatar
 
Join Date: Nov 2004
Location: Appleton WI
Posts: 23,929

Bikes: Several, mostly not name brands.

Mentioned: 146 Post(s)
Tagged: 0 Thread(s)
Quoted: 3119 Post(s)
Liked 2,355 Times in 1,390 Posts
I agree with the penetrating oil suggestion. Also, try some heat, from a hair drier or heat gun. It can help the oil penetrate more easily, and the aluminum arm will expand faster than the steel pedal spindle, which can also help loosen things. Finally, if you have a securely mounted bench vise, you can remove the arm from the bike, clamp it in the vise, and use a cheater pipe on your wrench to get more leverage, or an impact socket from the back side of the arm. This is easiest with the non-drive side arm, but can be done on the drive side as well. Use soft vise jaws to avoid marring the crank arm.
JohnDThompson is offline  
Old 11-23-22, 07:05 PM
  #11  
smd4
Senior Member
 
Join Date: Dec 2020
Location: Wake Forest, NC
Posts: 2,093

Bikes: 1989 Cinelli Supercorsa

Mentioned: 5 Post(s)
Tagged: 0 Thread(s)
Quoted: 1231 Post(s)
Liked 907 Times in 592 Posts
Originally Posted by veganbikes View Post
Make sure you are shifted into the bigger ring on the bike (you will all thank me later).
Ok, I‘ll bite: Why??
smd4 is online now  
Old 11-23-22, 07:14 PM
  #12  
veganbikes
Clark W. Griswold
 
Join Date: Mar 2014
Location: ,location, location
Posts: 10,661

Bikes: Foundry Chilkoot Ti W/Ultegra Di2, Salsa Timberjack Ti, Cinelli Mash Work RandoCross Fun Time Machine, 1x9 XT Parts Hybrid, Co-Motion Cascadia, Specialized Langster, Phil Wood Apple VeloXS Frame (w/DA 7400), R+M Supercharger2 Rohloff, Habanero Ti 26

Mentioned: 46 Post(s)
Tagged: 0 Thread(s)
Quoted: 3168 Post(s)
Liked 2,432 Times in 1,616 Posts
Originally Posted by smd4 View Post
Ok, I‘ll bite: Why??
So you don't hit your knuckles on exposed chainring. If you leave it in a smaller ring you can just bang right into them as careful as people think they are I have seen enough mechanics and people not do that and get into trouble.
veganbikes is offline  
Likes For veganbikes:
Old 11-23-22, 07:34 PM
  #13  
SoSmellyAir
Method to My Madness
 
Join Date: Nov 2020
Location: Orange County, California
Posts: 2,023

Bikes: Cannondale Synapse, Cannondale CAAD4, Trek FX 2

Mentioned: 3 Post(s)
Tagged: 0 Thread(s)
Quoted: 984 Post(s)
Liked 637 Times in 483 Posts
Originally Posted by JohnDThompson View Post
Also, try some heat, from a hair drier or heat gun.
I once had to use an Iwatani butane cooking torch (set on diffuse) on the pedal spindle from the back of the crankarm (for a few seconds).
SoSmellyAir is offline  
Old 11-23-22, 08:42 PM
  #14  
smd4
Senior Member
 
Join Date: Dec 2020
Location: Wake Forest, NC
Posts: 2,093

Bikes: 1989 Cinelli Supercorsa

Mentioned: 5 Post(s)
Tagged: 0 Thread(s)
Quoted: 1231 Post(s)
Liked 907 Times in 592 Posts
Originally Posted by veganbikes View Post
So you don't hit your knuckles on exposed chainring.
In 10 years of professional wrenching, I had never banged my knuckles on a chainring while trying to remove a pedal. I suppose for home mechanics without a stand it’s a pretty good common-sense idea.
smd4 is online now  
Likes For smd4:
Old 11-24-22, 12:36 AM
  #15  
veganbikes
Clark W. Griswold
 
Join Date: Mar 2014
Location: ,location, location
Posts: 10,661

Bikes: Foundry Chilkoot Ti W/Ultegra Di2, Salsa Timberjack Ti, Cinelli Mash Work RandoCross Fun Time Machine, 1x9 XT Parts Hybrid, Co-Motion Cascadia, Specialized Langster, Phil Wood Apple VeloXS Frame (w/DA 7400), R+M Supercharger2 Rohloff, Habanero Ti 26

Mentioned: 46 Post(s)
Tagged: 0 Thread(s)
Quoted: 3168 Post(s)
Liked 2,432 Times in 1,616 Posts
Originally Posted by smd4 View Post
In 10 years of professional wrenching, I had never banged my knuckles on a chainring while trying to remove a pedal. I suppose for home mechanics without a stand it’s a pretty good common-sense idea.
That is excellent luck, I have seen plenty of professionals do it and I have done it myself. It is a good extra bit of caution, never hurts to do it and is just good practice and good to teach others. Having crushed a finger nail in a fixed gear cog on the bike I try to be a bit more careful these days. That one was really dumb trying to clean grease and whatever stuff I got in there to disinfect it which was stickier than I should have put on was quite painful. I had no real reason to rush, the old shop was open late and I was cleaning my bike and lubing the chain and just went a little too fast for some dumb reason.
veganbikes is offline  
Old 11-24-22, 07:44 AM
  #16  
Moe Zhoost
Half way there
 
Moe Zhoost's Avatar
 
Join Date: Sep 2015
Location: North Carolina
Posts: 2,802

Bikes: Many, and the list changes frequently

Mentioned: 5 Post(s)
Tagged: 0 Thread(s)
Quoted: 923 Post(s)
Liked 778 Times in 462 Posts
Originally Posted by veganbikes View Post
So you don't hit your knuckles on exposed chainring. I
No, it's so you don't completely lacerate your knuckles on the chainring when the pedal breaks free.
Moe Zhoost is offline  
Likes For Moe Zhoost:
Old 11-24-22, 08:26 AM
  #17  
smd4
Senior Member
 
Join Date: Dec 2020
Location: Wake Forest, NC
Posts: 2,093

Bikes: 1989 Cinelli Supercorsa

Mentioned: 5 Post(s)
Tagged: 0 Thread(s)
Quoted: 1231 Post(s)
Liked 907 Times in 592 Posts
Originally Posted by veganbikes View Post
That is excellent luck.
Luck? Over 10 years? Nah. Just skill.
smd4 is online now  
Likes For smd4:
Old 11-24-22, 08:43 AM
  #18  
saulgoldie
Newbie
Thread Starter
 
Join Date: Aug 2022
Posts: 17
Mentioned: 0 Post(s)
Tagged: 0 Thread(s)
Quoted: 11 Post(s)
Liked 5 Times in 2 Posts
Thanks!

Thanks to all for the excellent advice! I gave up and took it to the bike shop. The young man had it off in half a jiffy. He had the Park tool, which I may buy one of. But I think I also might have loosened it for him. ;-)

And I remember now that back in the shop we always applied some grease on the threads when we installed pedals to help prevent just this sort of thing. The action of pedaling works to tighten the pedals on the crank. So there is no danger of them coming off. And when it is time to remove them, it goes easier.

Anyway, now I can remove the 165 cranks and install the 171s and reuse the pedals.

Thanks again!

Saul
saulgoldie is offline  
Likes For saulgoldie:
Old 11-24-22, 09:16 AM
  #19  
Schweinhund
I ain't heard no fat lady
 
Join Date: Oct 2022
Location: The CV of California
Posts: 250

Bikes: Just a bunch of crap

Mentioned: 4 Post(s)
Tagged: 0 Thread(s)
Quoted: 85 Post(s)
Liked 124 Times in 56 Posts
Originally Posted by smd4 View Post
In 10 years of professional wrenching, I had never banged my knuckles on a chainring while trying to remove a pedal. I suppose for home mechanics without a stand it’s a pretty good common-sense idea.
40+ years of unprofessional (very!, lol) bike mechanic-ing and I've never racked my knuckles on a chainring removing a pedal.
I've never found one I couldn't remove although more than once I brought the threads out too. I didn't use penetrating oil.
Use the penetrating oil, it'll save your crank arm.
Schweinhund is offline  
Likes For Schweinhund:
Old 11-24-22, 09:44 AM
  #20  
scottfsmith
I like bike
 
scottfsmith's Avatar
 
Join Date: Feb 2021
Location: Merry Land USA
Posts: 542

Bikes: Roubaix Comp 2020

Mentioned: 0 Post(s)
Tagged: 0 Thread(s)
Quoted: 225 Post(s)
Liked 223 Times in 147 Posts
Glad you got it off! I had a similar situation not long ago where I had to get some ancient pedals off in a time window with bike shops all closed. I tried all the standard tricks and then started to make stuff up in desperation. The way I got them off was with a standard 15mm wrench and a hand sledgehammer. A couple pounds on the wrench end and it was free. The heat / oil probably helped as well. I heard hammering is a bad idea but it worked for me. Sledgehammers have a lot of mass so put a lot more inertia into it compared to a regular hammer.
scottfsmith is offline  
Old 11-24-22, 11:14 PM
  #21  
rumrunn6
Senior Member
 
rumrunn6's Avatar
 
Join Date: Jul 2008
Location: 25 miles northwest of Boston
Posts: 28,042

Bikes: Bottecchia Sprint, GT Timberline 29r, Trek FX Alpha 7.0

Mentioned: 109 Post(s)
Tagged: 0 Thread(s)
Quoted: 4789 Post(s)
Liked 2,602 Times in 1,763 Posts
Originally Posted by saulgoldie View Post
And I remember now that back in the shop we always applied some grease on the threads when we installed pedals to help prevent just this sort of thing. The action of pedaling works to tighten the pedals on the crank. So there is no danger of them coming off. And when it is time to remove them, it goes easier.
I use old, silver, anti-seize, that I bought 2 decades ago (& an old French pedal wrench I found on Craigslist, or an Allen wrench for the pedals that require it)

if I remember correctly, I position the pedal forward, slightly up with the wrench facing backward. so that I can use my body weight downward w/o worrying about having to hold the other pedal on the other side

Last edited by rumrunn6; 11-25-22 at 08:23 AM.
rumrunn6 is offline  
Likes For rumrunn6:
Old 11-25-22, 08:25 AM
  #22  
rumrunn6
Senior Member
 
rumrunn6's Avatar
 
Join Date: Jul 2008
Location: 25 miles northwest of Boston
Posts: 28,042

Bikes: Bottecchia Sprint, GT Timberline 29r, Trek FX Alpha 7.0

Mentioned: 109 Post(s)
Tagged: 0 Thread(s)
Quoted: 4789 Post(s)
Liked 2,602 Times in 1,763 Posts
Originally Posted by saulgoldie View Post
Thanks to all for the excellent advice! I gave up and took it to the bike shop. The young man had it off in half a jiffy. He had the Park tool, which I may buy one of. But I think I also might have loosened it for him. ;-)
sometimes, w/ stuff like this, shops don't charge. I make sure to have a respectable cash tip ready in hand for such occasions
rumrunn6 is offline  
Old 11-25-22, 03:40 PM
  #23  
SurferRosa
señor miembro
 
SurferRosa's Avatar
 
Join Date: Dec 2018
Location: Pac NW
Posts: 6,405

Bikes: Old school lightweights

Mentioned: 77 Post(s)
Tagged: 0 Thread(s)
Quoted: 2681 Post(s)
Liked 3,790 Times in 2,014 Posts
Originally Posted by saulgoldie View Post
back in the shop we always applied some grease on the threads when we installed pedals.
Yeah, that's pretty important, just like freewheel threads.

The action of pedaling works to tighten the pedals on the crank.
I'm not really buying that. And I've seen riders stranded because their pedal came loose. You just need to use your 6mm allen wrench on the backside and tighten with force by hand. No need to do anything else, like using a long 15mm wrench.
SurferRosa is offline  
Likes For SurferRosa:
Old 11-25-22, 04:29 PM
  #24  
UnCruel 
Junior Member
 
Join Date: Sep 2015
Location: St. Louis, Missouri
Posts: 86

Bikes: Trek Émonda SL 5, Trek Checkpoint SL 5, Giant Trance X 2

Mentioned: 0 Post(s)
Tagged: 0 Thread(s)
Quoted: 46 Post(s)
Liked 44 Times in 28 Posts
I have at least twice resorted to using an impact wrench with an 8mm hex socket after other options failed. Both occasions were immediately successful. Definitely be absolutely sure you're turning in the correct direction if you do that. Keep in mind that the correct direction from the POV of a hex wrench is the opposite of an open-end wrench on the other side.

The note I used to remind myself: "The right-hand pedal has a right-hand thread, and the left-hand pedal has a left-hand thread. However! When using a tool passed through the crank arm, the opposite action must be taken. Thus, to loosen the right-hand (drive-side) pedal with an allen wrench, one must turn to the right, and to loosen the left-hand (non-drive-side) pedal with an allen wrench, one must turn to the left."
UnCruel is offline  

Posting Rules
You may not post new threads
You may not post replies
You may not post attachments
You may not edit your posts

BB code is On
Smilies are On
[IMG] code is On
HTML code is Off


Thread Tools
Search this Thread

Contact Us - Archive - Advertising - Cookie Policy - Privacy Statement - Terms of Service - Do Not Sell My Personal Information -

Copyright © 2022 MH Sub I, LLC dba Internet Brands. All rights reserved. Use of this site indicates your consent to the Terms of Use.