Go Back  Bike Forums > Bike Forums > Bicycle Mechanics
Reload this Page >

How do I adjust the bearings on this pedal?

Notices
Bicycle Mechanics Broken bottom bracket? Tacoed wheel? If you're having problems with your bicycle, or just need help fixing a flat, drop in here for the latest on bicycle mechanics & bicycle maintenance.

How do I adjust the bearings on this pedal?

Old 05-15-23, 03:05 PM
  #1  
icemilkcoffee 
Senior Member
Thread Starter
 
icemilkcoffee's Avatar
 
Join Date: Aug 2009
Posts: 2,180
Mentioned: 12 Post(s)
Tagged: 0 Thread(s)
Quoted: 1285 Post(s)
Liked 1,290 Times in 745 Posts
How do I adjust the bearings on this pedal?

I bought these Odyssey Twisted PC pedals for my sonís bike. They felt dry and rough out of the box so I opened it up to grease and adjust


The problem is that there is nothing between the cone nut and the locknut. When you tighten the lock nut the cone also turns with it. There is no keyed washer between the two like youíd expect to see. How do I hold the cone nut stationary while tightening the lock nut?
icemilkcoffee is offline  
Old 05-15-23, 06:32 PM
  #2  
cyccommute 
Mad bike riding scientist
 
cyccommute's Avatar
 
Join Date: Nov 2004
Location: Denver, CO
Posts: 26,718

Bikes: Some silver ones, a red one, a black and orange one, and a few titanium ones

Mentioned: 145 Post(s)
Tagged: 1 Thread(s)
Quoted: 5806 Post(s)
Liked 3,590 Times in 2,072 Posts
Originally Posted by icemilkcoffee
I bought these Odyssey Twisted PC pedals for my sonís bike. They felt dry and rough out of the box so I opened it up to grease and adjust

The problem is that there is nothing between the cone nut and the locknut. When you tighten the lock nut the cone also turns with it. There is no keyed washer between the two like youíd expect to see. How do I hold the cone nut stationary while tightening the lock nut?
Pedals are difficult. Too little room for two wrenches. Yes, you tighten the lock nut agains the cone nut like any cup and cone system. The problem is holding the cone stationary. The only way Iíve figured out how to do it is to push a screw driver against the flats of the cone so that the cone wonít turn and use a socket on the locknut. There usually isnít a lot of room to work with.
__________________
Stuart Black
Gold Fever Three days of dirt in Colorado
Pokin' around the Poconos A cold ride around Lake Erie
Dinosaurs in Colorado A mountain bike guide to the Purgatory Canyon dinosaur trackway
Solo Without Pie. The search for pie in the Midwest.
Picking the Scablands. Washington and Oregon, 2005. Pie and spiders on the Columbia River!
Days of Wineless Roads. Bed and Breakfasting along the KATY
Twisting Down the Alley. Misadventures in tornado alley.
cyccommute is online now  
Likes For cyccommute:
Old 05-15-23, 07:02 PM
  #3  
_ForceD_
Sr Member on Sr bikes
 
_ForceD_'s Avatar
 
Join Date: Jul 2015
Location: Rhode Island (sometimes in SE Florida)
Posts: 2,156

Bikes: Several...from old junk to new all-carbon.

Mentioned: 11 Post(s)
Tagged: 0 Thread(s)
Quoted: 941 Post(s)
Liked 685 Times in 365 Posts
I have used very skinny needle nose pliers to hold the cone stationary from an angle, allowing me to get a socket on the lock nut.
Other advice is to jam the cone nut with a small screwdriver so that it canít spin, and then using a socket to tighten the lock nut. But, the screwdriver might not allow you to get the socket on because the screwdriver thickens out and there isnít room for the socket. So, Iíve used the flat part of an old blade spoke to jam the cone nut and that gives me enough space to get a thinner, deep socket onto the lock nut.

Dan

Last edited by _ForceD_; 05-15-23 at 07:40 PM.
_ForceD_ is offline  
Old 05-15-23, 07:22 PM
  #4  
KCT1986
Senior Member
 
Join Date: Jan 2016
Posts: 625
Mentioned: 1 Post(s)
Tagged: 0 Thread(s)
Quoted: 250 Post(s)
Liked 194 Times in 145 Posts
For Shimano pedals with this type of bearings, they have special tools to do the adjustment. Don't know what the sizes of each socket is & if it would be usable for any other makers' pedals.

KCT1986 is offline  
Likes For KCT1986:
Old 05-15-23, 07:23 PM
  #5  
maddog34
Senior Member
 
maddog34's Avatar
 
Join Date: Jul 2015
Location: NW Oregon
Posts: 2,736

Bikes: !982 Trek 930R Custom, Diamondback ascent with SERIOUS updates, Fuji Team Pro CF and a '09 Comencal Meta 5.5

Mentioned: 15 Post(s)
Tagged: 1 Thread(s)
Quoted: 1196 Post(s)
Liked 603 Times in 437 Posts
if you have a welder handy, you can determine the cone Hex size, cut down a deep socket, attach a handle to that remnant, then use a 1/4 drive 10, 12, or whatever to tighten the Jam nut... I've made a couple tools like that for valve adjustments over the years... Snap-on used to sell similar tools, but expect to cut off an arm and half a leg to buy one.....

( i usually just use a screwdriver to hold the cone... i set the driver in place, then TWIST the blade to wedge the Cone.... and it will take a few tries to get the right tension on the bearing.)

Last edited by maddog34; 05-15-23 at 07:38 PM.
maddog34 is offline  
Old 05-15-23, 07:25 PM
  #6  
Andrew R Stewart 
Senior Member
 
Andrew R Stewart's Avatar
 
Join Date: Feb 2012
Location: Rochester, NY
Posts: 17,546

Bikes: Stewart S&S coupled sport tourer, Stewart Sunday light, Stewart Commuting, Stewart Touring, Co Motion Tandem, Stewart 3-Spd, Stewart Track, Fuji Finest, Mongoose Tomac ATB, GT Bravado ATB, JCP Folder, Stewart 650B ATB

Mentioned: 0 Post(s)
Tagged: 0 Thread(s)
Quoted: 3972 Post(s)
Liked 3,337 Times in 2,022 Posts
At one time Shimano did make a tool for adjusting some of their pedal bearing preloads. Basically two thin wall sockets, one inside the other. Even still the process wasn't as slick as hubs are. Andy
__________________
AndrewRStewart
Andrew R Stewart is offline  
Old 05-15-23, 10:00 PM
  #7  
GamblerGORD53
Senior Member
 
Join Date: Apr 2010
Location: Elevation 666m Edmonton Canada
Posts: 2,311

Bikes: 2013 Custom SA5w / Rohloff Tourster

Mentioned: 6 Post(s)
Tagged: 0 Thread(s)
Quoted: 1144 Post(s)
Liked 264 Times in 205 Posts
Get a refund. THey are GARBAGE. I bungled into similar. Those 1/16" bearings are totally STUPID. They can NEVER feel right with ZERO play possible.
GamblerGORD53 is online now  
Old 05-15-23, 10:54 PM
  #8  
icemilkcoffee 
Senior Member
Thread Starter
 
icemilkcoffee's Avatar
 
Join Date: Aug 2009
Posts: 2,180
Mentioned: 12 Post(s)
Tagged: 0 Thread(s)
Quoted: 1285 Post(s)
Liked 1,290 Times in 745 Posts
I ended up using a tiny flat screw driver to try to immobilize the cone. It barely worked. But it certainly doesn't give me any reassuring feeling of tightness. We'll see how long this one holds.
The Shimano tool is still available it turns out, but it's too small for the 12mm/15mm nuts here.
icemilkcoffee is offline  
Old 05-15-23, 11:56 PM
  #9  
SurferRosa
seŮor miembro
 
SurferRosa's Avatar
 
Join Date: Dec 2018
Location: Pac NW
Posts: 8,117

Bikes: '70s - '80s Campagnolo

Mentioned: 89 Post(s)
Tagged: 0 Thread(s)
Quoted: 3517 Post(s)
Liked 5,642 Times in 2,832 Posts
If the axle is keyed, you may still be able to get washers from Scott at SD bicycle garage.

Scott at SD BICYCLE GARAGE has those keyed washers for Campagnolo and KKT pedals.

info@sdbicyclegarage.com
​​​​​​​
SurferRosa is offline  
Old 05-16-23, 08:14 AM
  #10  
cyccommute 
Mad bike riding scientist
 
cyccommute's Avatar
 
Join Date: Nov 2004
Location: Denver, CO
Posts: 26,718

Bikes: Some silver ones, a red one, a black and orange one, and a few titanium ones

Mentioned: 145 Post(s)
Tagged: 1 Thread(s)
Quoted: 5806 Post(s)
Liked 3,590 Times in 2,072 Posts
Originally Posted by icemilkcoffee
I ended up using a tiny flat screw driver to try to immobilize the cone. It barely worked. But it certainly doesn't give me any reassuring feeling of tightness. We'll see how long this one holds.
The Shimano tool is still available it turns out, but it's too small for the 12mm/15mm nuts here.
To be clear, I didnít say it worked well. Not many people Iíve ever run across like to rebuild pedals and usually donít bother. PedalsÖespecially ones with loose bearingsÖare relatively cheap and not worth too much bother to rebuild. I have a number of cartridge bearing pedals that can be rebuilt but none of bearings have worn out so I havenít had to replace them.
__________________
Stuart Black
Gold Fever Three days of dirt in Colorado
Pokin' around the Poconos A cold ride around Lake Erie
Dinosaurs in Colorado A mountain bike guide to the Purgatory Canyon dinosaur trackway
Solo Without Pie. The search for pie in the Midwest.
Picking the Scablands. Washington and Oregon, 2005. Pie and spiders on the Columbia River!
Days of Wineless Roads. Bed and Breakfasting along the KATY
Twisting Down the Alley. Misadventures in tornado alley.
cyccommute is online now  
Likes For cyccommute:
Old 05-16-23, 09:16 AM
  #11  
Koyote
Senior Member
 
Join Date: Sep 2017
Posts: 7,259
Mentioned: 35 Post(s)
Tagged: 0 Thread(s)
Quoted: 6500 Post(s)
Liked 10,144 Times in 4,346 Posts
I think you've just figured out that $20 pedals aren't really intended to be serviceable.
Koyote is online now  
Likes For Koyote:
Old 05-16-23, 09:56 AM
  #12  
icemilkcoffee 
Senior Member
Thread Starter
 
icemilkcoffee's Avatar
 
Join Date: Aug 2009
Posts: 2,180
Mentioned: 12 Post(s)
Tagged: 0 Thread(s)
Quoted: 1285 Post(s)
Liked 1,290 Times in 745 Posts
To think that I specifically chose a loose ball bearing pedal over the sleeve bushings, so I could fine tune and lubricate them.....
icemilkcoffee is offline  
Old 05-16-23, 09:59 AM
  #13  
icemilkcoffee 
Senior Member
Thread Starter
 
icemilkcoffee's Avatar
 
Join Date: Aug 2009
Posts: 2,180
Mentioned: 12 Post(s)
Tagged: 0 Thread(s)
Quoted: 1285 Post(s)
Liked 1,290 Times in 745 Posts
Originally Posted by cyccommute
To be clear, I didnít say it worked well. Not many people Iíve ever run across like to rebuild pedals and usually donít bother. PedalsÖespecially ones with loose bearingsÖare relatively cheap and not worth too much bother to rebuild. I have a number of cartridge bearing pedals that can be rebuilt but none of bearings have worn out so I havenít had to replace them.
You know that term 'catridge bearing' - does it mean a sealed ball bearing or just a bushing?
icemilkcoffee is offline  
Old 05-16-23, 01:41 PM
  #14  
streetsurfer
Full Member
 
Join Date: Jul 2022
Location: Illinois
Posts: 284
Mentioned: 1 Post(s)
Tagged: 0 Thread(s)
Quoted: 81 Post(s)
Liked 238 Times in 126 Posts
Needle nose pliers

I recently used these to hold the cone while locking the adjustment in.


streetsurfer is offline  
Old 05-16-23, 01:44 PM
  #15  
streetsurfer
Full Member
 
Join Date: Jul 2022
Location: Illinois
Posts: 284
Mentioned: 1 Post(s)
Tagged: 0 Thread(s)
Quoted: 81 Post(s)
Liked 238 Times in 126 Posts
Cartridge bearing is not loose bearings between a cone and cup, but a contained unit, sealed or not. With inner and outer races, and balls (usually in a cage) between them as a single unit.
streetsurfer is offline  
Old 05-16-23, 03:55 PM
  #16  
maddog34
Senior Member
 
maddog34's Avatar
 
Join Date: Jul 2015
Location: NW Oregon
Posts: 2,736

Bikes: !982 Trek 930R Custom, Diamondback ascent with SERIOUS updates, Fuji Team Pro CF and a '09 Comencal Meta 5.5

Mentioned: 15 Post(s)
Tagged: 1 Thread(s)
Quoted: 1196 Post(s)
Liked 603 Times in 437 Posts
now that the topic is adrift... try just sliding a thin wall socket onto the cone hex and turning it outward 1/8 of a turn at a time... retest the tension, or lack thereof, between every 1/8 turn... USUALLY, this will NOT loosen the jam force, but WILL loosen the bearing drag...

the "no tabbed washer" design allows this trick... and sometimes the jam nut loosens too much due to really lousy thread quality control...

MOST new, "under $25" pedals arrive here with too-tight bearings... sigh...

i do similar with un-tabwashered Front wheel axle cones too... two cone wrenches to loosen, two 17mm wrenches to tighten... (ssshhh... don't tell anyone... ) correct jam tension feel is critical in this case.

Last edited by maddog34; 05-16-23 at 04:01 PM.
maddog34 is offline  
Likes For maddog34:
Old 05-16-23, 06:00 PM
  #17  
cyccommute 
Mad bike riding scientist
 
cyccommute's Avatar
 
Join Date: Nov 2004
Location: Denver, CO
Posts: 26,718

Bikes: Some silver ones, a red one, a black and orange one, and a few titanium ones

Mentioned: 145 Post(s)
Tagged: 1 Thread(s)
Quoted: 5806 Post(s)
Liked 3,590 Times in 2,072 Posts
Originally Posted by icemilkcoffee
You know that term 'catridge bearing' - does it mean a sealed ball bearing or just a bushing?
What streetsurfer said. The illustration on this page is a good example of a cartridge bearingÖone with a seal and one without. Think of them like bearings in a cage but the cage is more elaborate.
__________________
Stuart Black
Gold Fever Three days of dirt in Colorado
Pokin' around the Poconos A cold ride around Lake Erie
Dinosaurs in Colorado A mountain bike guide to the Purgatory Canyon dinosaur trackway
Solo Without Pie. The search for pie in the Midwest.
Picking the Scablands. Washington and Oregon, 2005. Pie and spiders on the Columbia River!
Days of Wineless Roads. Bed and Breakfasting along the KATY
Twisting Down the Alley. Misadventures in tornado alley.
cyccommute is online now  
Old 05-20-23, 06:47 AM
  #18  
grumpus
Senior Member
 
grumpus's Avatar
 
Join Date: Apr 2016
Posts: 675
Mentioned: 1 Post(s)
Tagged: 0 Thread(s)
Quoted: 254 Post(s)
Liked 219 Times in 171 Posts
Originally Posted by icemilkcoffee
The problem is that there is nothing between the cone nut and the locknut. When you tighten the lock nut the cone also turns with it. There is no keyed washer between the two like youíd expect to see. How do I hold the cone nut stationary while tightening the lock nut?
Jam a large flat screwdriver between a flat on the cone and the outer bearing race, tighten the locknut some, back off the cone to the right adjustment, see if you can tighten the locknut a little more.
grumpus is offline  
Old 05-20-23, 08:02 AM
  #19  
xroadcharlie
Senior Member
 
Join Date: Apr 2019
Location: Windsor Ontario, Canada
Posts: 522

Bikes: 2018 Giant Sedona

Mentioned: 1 Post(s)
Tagged: 0 Thread(s)
Quoted: 175 Post(s)
Liked 114 Times in 94 Posts
Buying some bicycle pedals is a crap shoot. I believe quality control is the variable here. If you get lucky even cheap $15 pedals are fine for many riders. I bought a pair at the bike shop for that and the right pedal is good. Very light, Good grip on the shoe, almost zero resistance to turn, and no play. They overtightened the bearing on the left pedal and it has noticeable resistance and grinds when it turns.

I'm tempted to buy another pair of them if the left pedal has not been overtightened. I wouldn't mind spending $30 on these pedals if they worked correctly. I threw out the package and forgotthe brand. They don't even put the brand name on the pedal. So I see the same pedals at different stores and different brand names only on the package.

Last edited by xroadcharlie; 05-20-23 at 08:20 AM.
xroadcharlie is offline  

Posting Rules
You may not post new threads
You may not post replies
You may not post attachments
You may not edit your posts

BB code is On
Smilies are On
[IMG] code is On
HTML code is Off


Thread Tools
Search this Thread

Contact Us - Archive - Advertising - Cookie Policy - Privacy Statement - Terms of Service - Do Not Sell or Share My Personal Information -

Copyright © 2023 MH Sub I, LLC dba Internet Brands. All rights reserved. Use of this site indicates your consent to the Terms of Use.