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Wheel is slow after installing new cassette

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Wheel is slow after installing new cassette

Old 06-08-23, 08:13 AM
  #26  
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Originally Posted by soyabean
Often DIY don't own cone wrenches, which are not always needed to undo all the nuts from an axle.

Upon reassembly, they finger tight the opposite cones onto the bearings, but using only two wrenches on each end of the 17mm nuts, they squish it all together, inadvertantly turning and tightening the cones even more onto the bearings.

Bearings don't work at all when they are compressed.

The purpose of the cone wrench is to hold the cone nut in place, giving the bearings the sweet spot space to move.
Thanks for sharing. I am learning the names of the tools. I had to use between 15, 16, and 17 cone wrenches to un-tighten and tighten the nuts.
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Old 06-08-23, 09:15 AM
  #27  
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Originally Posted by bikecommuter13
Thanks for sharing. I am learning the names of the tools. I had to use between 15, 16, and 17 cone wrenches to un-tighten and tighten the nuts.
getting the knack to properly adjust the cones, and then tighten down the locknut without tightening the cones is a skill that is a bit fiddly, so having someone help you get a proper feel for things is a big help, and like a lot of hands on skills, you probably wont get it right first time, but thats normal.
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Old 06-10-23, 01:32 PM
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So I fixed the knocking issue after servicing the hub: wheel is turning ok

But now the chain won't go to the biggest sprocket, and it will fall through the smallest one.

I think it's related the fact that the axel is not evenly installed:



I don't have enough tools at home to re-adjust the axel, and I thought I could adjust the derailleur instead. And as usual, I made a mess . Now the tire is rubbing on one side even more -- while maybe it was rubbing a tiny bit before.

So one step forward and two steps back.

It takes so much time to learn this stuff, lol.
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Old 06-10-23, 02:50 PM
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The axle length has nothing to do with it.

A certain member here cautions against tinkering with the limits screws, but it sounds like just such an issue to me. Unless tinkering with them is what led to these new problems. You did say you tried to adjust the derailleur. Did you mess with the screws?

It also sounds like the wheel is in the dropouts incorrectly. Or the frame is misaligned, which your mechanic pointed out.

If you had someone knowledgeable around who could explain things to you in person, youíd learn a lot faster.

Last edited by smd4; 06-10-23 at 03:20 PM.
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Old 06-10-23, 04:43 PM
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Originally Posted by bikecommuter13
Thanks for sharing. I am learning the names of the tools. I had to use between 15, 16, and 17 cone wrenches to un-tighten and tighten the nuts.
"Typically", a standard 17mm box end wrench will work "better" than a thin cone wrench-
Reason being is that the 17mm nut is on the end and easily accessible. There are exceptions, but typically.....
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Old 06-10-23, 04:47 PM
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Originally Posted by bikecommuter13
So I fixed the knocking issue after servicing the hub: wheel is turning ok

But now the chain won't go to the biggest sprocket, and it will fall through the smallest one.

I think it's related the fact that the axel is not evenly installed:



I don't have enough tools at home to re-adjust the axel, and I thought I could adjust the derailleur instead. And as usual, I made a mess . Now the tire is rubbing on one side even more -- while maybe it was rubbing a tiny bit before.

So one step forward and two steps back.

It takes so much time to learn this stuff, lol.
The locknut is what bears inside the drop outs. The cassette is going to stay in the same place in relation to the lock nut. ERGO, axle length is moot re: cassette placement.

Sometimes you simply have to step back and take a breath, look and think for a moment. Repeat as needed.
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Old 06-10-23, 06:11 PM
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Originally Posted by Bill Kapaun
The locknut is what bears inside the drop outs. The cassette is going to stay in the same place in relation to the lock nut. ERGO, axle length is moot re: cassette placement.

Sometimes you simply have to step back and take a breath, look and think for a moment. Repeat as needed.
The locknut is on the left in my picture right (on the cassette side)? So if I push/screw it in a bit the wheel will be positioned a bit to the left right?

Regarding the derailleur, I didn't touch the limit screws. All I did was loosening the cable and tightening it again.
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Old 06-10-23, 06:18 PM
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Originally Posted by bikecommuter13
The locknut is on the left in my picture right (on the cassette side)? So if I push/screw it in a bit the wheel will be positioned a bit to the left right?

Regarding the derailleur, I didn't touch the limit screws. All I did was loosening the cable and tightening it again.
You canít screw the lock nut on any further. It is what it is. If you didnít move any spacers from one side to the other, the position of both locknuts are pre-determined.

It sounds like you donít have a good understanding of the most basic mechanical concepts, let alone bike mechanics. Itís something you can learn, but you really need to be taking baby steps at this point. Rear derailleur and hub bearing adjustment are like running a marathon.

Iím having a hard time making any diagnosis/ suggestions, because I think everything may be so far out of whack at this point that guessing what the problems might be is now an exercise in futility. Get the bike to a qualified mechanic before things get worse.

Last edited by smd4; 06-10-23 at 06:48 PM.
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Old 06-10-23, 06:24 PM
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Originally Posted by bikecommuter13
The locknut is on the left in my picture right (on the cassette side)? So if I push/screw it in a bit the wheel will be positioned a bit to the left right?

Regarding the derailleur, I didn't touch the limit screws. All I did was loosening the cable and tightening it again.
Cones adjust the bearing play and the LOCK nut, locks the cones so they don't change adjustment. The amount of spacers etc. underneath stays the same for THAT specific hub. You DON'T screw with it!
Every time you do something without knowing WHY, you're just demolishing the foundation of your repair.
You need to learn what NOT to do.
Study the PARK Tools repair guide before you try stuff. Have an idea of what to expect and plan for pitfalls.
https://www.parktool.com/en-us/blog/repair-help

When I first started repairing bikes, I studied Sheldon Brown's website for hours at a time.
I also learned another neat trick when in doubt. LOOK at another bike that operates correctly.

Last edited by Bill Kapaun; 06-10-23 at 07:16 PM.
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