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Wheel is slow after installing new cassette

Old 06-05-23, 11:38 AM
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Wheel is stopping too fast after installing new cassette

I have just installed a new cassette. I have noticed that the wheel is stopping too fast without brakes when I put it on a bike stand and turning it. At the back of the cassette, there are 3 small screws. Am I supposed to remove them before installing? Are they the cause for the slowness?:



I can't upload the iphone recording to the post. Here is the google drive link

Last edited by bikecommuter13; 06-05-23 at 11:42 AM.
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Old 06-05-23, 11:44 AM
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That wheel is HOINKED! Oy! (dayum!) Looks like you may have inadvertently tightened up your cones while installing your new cassette
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Old 06-05-23, 12:09 PM
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If the screws were a problem you would have heard them ticking on the spokes or whatever else they were touching.

Before fretting over what may be nothing, how much slower are we talking about? Unless we're talking about a wheel that slows to a stop in a few revolutions, variations in how long a wheel spins are meaningless.
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Old 06-05-23, 12:14 PM
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From the video it looks more like a brake rub problem - maybe the wheel got cockeyed or the calipers got bumped out of position.
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Old 06-05-23, 12:17 PM
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Originally Posted by DiabloScott
From the video it looks more like a brake rub problem - maybe the wheel got cockeyed or the calipers got bumped out of position.
No brakes. I am thinking either the 3 little screws on the back of the cassette -- since the old cassette didn't have them. Or I have over-tightened the cassette.
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Old 06-05-23, 12:32 PM
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Originally Posted by bikecommuter13
No brakes. I am thinking either the 3 little screws on the back of the cassette -- since the old cassette didn't have them. Or I have over-tightened the cassette.
well since you think you've figured out the problem.. why are you asking people for their diagnoses?

smh.

those pins (not "screws") are not your issue. MOST cassetteshave them to make installing a cassette easier and more idiot-proof.

and neither is "overtightening the lockring".

there IS a chance that the lockring is rubbing the dust cover inside the freehub.. did you move that dust cover?

there's a much larger chance that something got knocked out of alignment in your BRAKE SYSTEM.

and, if you installed a provided SPACER behind the cassette, and it WASN'T NEEDED, then that might cause a lockring to rub your frame at the dropout.

Now quit second guessing a bunch of people trying to help you and inspect YOUR BIKE'S BRAKES First, ok?

and you might try loosening the Quick Release some to see if it's Too DARN Tight... just a guess, but i've seen that WAY too many times... the Axle COMPRESSES when the QR is tightened... it makes a Notchy feel when you turn the wheel slowly... and as the wheel stopped spinning in the vid, IT ROCKED BACKWARDS at the very end of the spin.. NOTCHY BEARINGS.. ! for that matter, pull the rear wheel and CHECK YOUR AXLE BEARINGS...they SHOULD have a Tiny, tiny bit of play, and Turn Smoothly., with NO NOTCHINESS..

I'm suspecting that you're just now finding a problem that was already happening.... at least you've found it. now go isolate and remedy it, ok?
Don't "Think"... Find out.

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Old 06-05-23, 12:39 PM
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Originally Posted by maddog34
well since you think you've figured out the problem.. why are you asking people for their diagnoses?

smh.

those pins (not "screws") are not your issue. MOST cassetteshave them to make installing a cassette easier and more idiot-proof.
and neither is "overtightening the lockring".

there IS a chancethat the lockring is rubbing the dust cover inside the freehub.. did you move that dust cover?

there's a much larger chance that something got knocked out of alignment in your BRAKE SYSTEM.

and, if you installed a provided SPACER behind the cassette, and it WASN'T NEEDED, then that might cause a lockring to rub yor frame at the dropout.

Now quit second guessing a bunch of people trying to help you and inspect YOUR BIKE'S BRAKES First, ok?
I didn't mean to second guess people. But the brakes are the first thing I checked. I have loosen the brake cable. It's not rubbing. It's just that I don't change cassette too often and it takes a lot of time for me to get things done right (or just in order). So I wanted to get some insight from people here before I redo everything again.
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Old 06-05-23, 12:50 PM
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Recently, I had a customer bring his bike in after he had installed a cassette for the first time. With each rotation of the wheel, there was a spot in the rotation where the wheel had an abnormal amount of resistance/drag. After a close look, I determined that he had cross threaded his cassette lockring, and at some point in the wheel's rotation the lockring, being slanted outboard at this point from being cross threaded, was rubbing the dropout. I had never seen that before. For one thing, there is almost always a gap between the lockring and the dropout that would make that imposssible, even with a cross threaded lockring. But on this bike, it happened. I removed his lockring, and the threads were damaged enough that I had to replace it. After replacing with a new lockring, all was welll.

I recommend double checking the lockring to make sure it's not cross threaded and rubbing at the dropout.
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Old 06-05-23, 01:11 PM
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Did you do anything else besides change the cassette?
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Old 06-05-23, 02:08 PM
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Originally Posted by bikecommuter13
I have just installed a new cassette. I have noticed that the wheel is stopping too fast without brakes when I put it on a bike stand and turning it. At the back of the cassette, there are 3 small screws. Am I supposed to remove them before installing? Are they the cause for the slowness?
If the screws/rivets/whatever that hold the cassette together were rubbing they would move the cassette/chain/cranks on overrun, I see no sign of that. If the cassette/lockring/chain//rim/tyre aren't rubbing then your problem is the hub bearings - it seems likely that they are seriously over-tightened (probably because the drive side cone locknut was loose allowing bearing drag to auto-tighten the cone). Or the axle might be bent/broken.
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Old 06-05-23, 02:32 PM
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As maddog34 mentioned, check the dust cover. I had a similar issue on my gravel bike where the centerlock lockring for the rear disc was pressing against the hub dust cap/seal and causing drag. Comparing it to the previous lockring on my bike, the thread length was longer on the new one. Similarly, it could be the lockring for the new cassette might be dragging.
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Old 06-05-23, 05:47 PM
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Thanks folks. Here is what I have found out. If I don't tighten the axel at all, the wheel is turning ok, but I get some nocking in the dropout. Here is a video in google drive

The more I tighten the axel, the less turning the wheel will do. What would be the root cause of this issue? Do I need to rebuild or replace the hub?
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Old 06-05-23, 06:20 PM
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did you remove the wheel and check for a notchy axle feel yet?

did you check to see if the lockring is cross threaded or hitting the dust cover behind it?

did you consider going to a bike co-op or local bike shop to have them look at your mess, or are you hoping someone here can magically fix it for you over the internet?

Go To A Bike Shop and let them fix your mess.

ps.. that rim is hammered. I'd figure the axle bearings are also neglected.
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Old 06-05-23, 08:28 PM
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+1 You really do need to take the bike to a shop.
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Old 06-06-23, 07:35 AM
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Originally Posted by shelbyfv
+1 You really do need to take the bike to a shop.
My late father-in-law (a chemist) was fond of saying, "Sometimes 15 minutes in the lab will save you two weeks at the chalkboard."

Five minutes with an experienced mechanic could save you two weeks of back-and-forth with people trying to help on-line. And perhaps save some hardware from damage, too!
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Old 06-06-23, 08:37 AM
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Why is the quick release not clamped down in the video?

Is clamping the QR what you are describing as tightening the axle?

QR and axle are two different things.
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Old 06-06-23, 01:05 PM
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+1 bike shop and to the rim seeing better days - certainly something catching the wheel in spots; i.e. bad bearings or just a wonky wheel in general.
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Old 06-06-23, 08:04 PM
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Originally Posted by Schweinhund
Remove wheel from frame.
Place one hand on top of wheel
Place second hand on axle
Rotate said Axle.
See if axle turns normally or if it's loose or it's tight there's a problem
Come back, let the forum know if there's a problem here.
If the axle is normal, next rotate the cassette in the reverse direction, does it turn normally or does it drag when it should spin freely?
If it drags. come back let the forum know.
If it's free, check to see if you have something dragging against a dropout.
It's a process of elimination.
Thanks for the suggestions. All the things you pointed out seemed fine. I will bring it to a local Bike Kitchen to get some help.
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Old 06-06-23, 08:38 PM
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not sure if your wheel has a similar composition, but this happened to me when i had the wrong endcap on one side. tightening the thru-axle (a different kind of wheel than yours, obviously) caused it to stop spinning.
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Old 06-07-23, 06:17 AM
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so #13, if you have any interest in learning about doing bike mechanics, I would highly recommend finding a local bike coop where someone can teach you real life hands on stuff.
Reading internets stuff can only go so far, and getting more experienced actually holding and using tools, actually feeling parts and how they should turn, be greased, etc can only be taught in person.
Whether you have an interest in learning is up to you. All of us had to learn bit by bit, by making mistakes, slowly accumulating skills and experience.

I mention this because numerous times I have shown friends how their hubs were overtightened, or loose or whatever, and by having them actually hold and turn a properly greased and adjusted axle from one of my bikes, and then give them their wheel to feel the difference--this was the only way for them to appreciate what I was talking about.
Same with taking apart a hub, regreasing it, setting the cones to the right tightness, replacing the rubber seal thing (which yes, can rub too much, Ive had this happen) etc etc
All of this comes from actually doing it, and making mistakes, but having a knowledgeable real person to help you with the mistakes is what you need.

or not, and take it to a bike shop if you aren't interested.
and thats ok too.
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Old 06-07-23, 08:13 AM
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Take the cassette off and mount the wheel on the bike and spin it. Diagnosis is the first step, guessing isn't.
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Old 06-07-23, 09:03 AM
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Originally Posted by wheelreason
Take the cassette off and mount the wheel on the bike and spin it. Diagnosis is the first step, guessing isn't.
Some of my best fixes came from WAG's lol.
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Old 06-08-23, 12:17 AM
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So I went to a local bike kitchen, spent 3 hours there. The cone nut was too tight or something. I ended up taking apart the wheel hub multiple times and putting the pieces back to try to fix the issue. In the end, I have probably found more issues. Now the wheel (the tire) is sometimes touching the frame. The mechanic said he noticed the frame is not in symmetry. I will have to go back to do more troubleshooting.

So maybe I always had the problems before I replaced the cassette and just didn't pay enough attention to notice it.

It's so time consuming. Maybe I should have just drop it off in a shop and have others do all the troubleshooting. But it's good to learn too
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Old 06-08-23, 05:25 AM
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If you are enjoying learning stuff and the bike kitchen mechanic is available to help you, then it's time well spent. If you just want to ride your bike, then take it to the shop.
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Old 06-08-23, 05:34 AM
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Often DIY don't own cone wrenches, which are not always needed to undo all the nuts from an axle.

Upon reassembly, they finger tight the opposite cones onto the bearings, but using only two wrenches on each end of the 17mm nuts, they squish it all together, inadvertantly turning and tightening the cones even more onto the bearings.

Bearings don't work at all when they are compressed.

The purpose of the cone wrench is to hold the cone nut in place, giving the bearings the sweet spot space to move.
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