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New Wheels Built on Old Hubs

Old 08-09-23, 05:08 PM
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New Wheels Built on Old Hubs

I'm not new to biking but there's a lot I never got into before what I may want to attempt next.

Relatively new to this forum too, there are posts I've authored in the C&V sub-forum about the Motobecane I bought new in early April 1972.

It came with MAVIC tubular rims and (I have no idea what brand of) tubular tires. I just completed its third 'renovation' so I could ride it once again, current tires are (12+ year-old) Vittoria Competition in front and a Conti Giro at the back:



MAVIC tubular rims (700c?)

I found a nice, clean pair of identical Campy 36H wide-flange hubs on eBay just arrived today. I want to build a second pair of wheels around them, onto which I'll mount a pair of Challenge Strada 27mm tubulars.

So my question: these new (to me) old hubs are in pristine condition save for the spoke holes where on the previous wheels they'd carried the spokes've pushed a bit of metal about that's raised a tiny burr at the perimeter of each hole where spokes bore against the hub flanges on the outside and inside.

When I go to lace new spokes & rims on these hubs is it better to follow the previous pattern of spoke lacing so the new spokes rest in the grooves left from the old builds, or should I 'reverse' the new lacing so new spokes create their own "saddles" in the flanges?

All comments most welcome; I'm here to learn stuff I've yet to encounter.
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Old 08-09-23, 06:13 PM
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You're "supposed to" use the existing pattern.
I wouldn't "undo" a screw up though.
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Old 08-09-23, 08:10 PM
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Mavic's old Championnats proved fairly soft. Hopefully you found a good set of rims and spokes.
Personally, I would lace to follow the hubs' pattern. Most likely three-cross.
Make sure to thoroughly stress the wheels/spokes by pressing the rims with the hubs in contact with the floor.
I forget what they call that!
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Old 08-09-23, 08:38 PM
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Originally Posted by roadcrankr
Make sure to thoroughly stress the wheels/spokes by pressing the rims with the hubs in contact with the floor.
I forget what they call that!
Although this is my preferred method for stress relieving a wheel to settle the spokes I wouldn't do it with an older, softer rim, a little too much pressure and it'll actually taco. Won't be a big deal if it does, just have to completely loosen the spokes and retension, since the rim won't be bent. With a weaker rim better to grab pairs of spokes on opposite sides and squeeze them moving around the wheel.

OP, wouldn't waste time sanding or filing if you're trying to maintain the patina, they won't damage the spokes since the aluminum is weaker than the rim, unless you plan to polish the whole hub anyways. And yes, match the old build pattern, stretching the holes in the opposite direction can increase the chances of cracking the flange.
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Old 08-09-23, 10:19 PM
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follow the original pattern...otherwise the spokes can end up PULLING perpendicular to the indentations. and they become stress risers in the old, poorly alloyed, material.. !
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Old 08-09-23, 10:42 PM
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Originally Posted by maddog34
follow the original pattern...otherwise the spokes can end up PULLING perpendicular to the indentations. and they become stress risers in the old, poorly alloyed, material.. !
Yes. Back when Campagnolo offered a lifetime warranty for their components, I was told by a Campy rep that if a cracked hub flange showed evidence that the hub had been rebuilt in a pattern different from that of the original build, the warranty was void.
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Old 08-10-23, 07:12 AM
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Wonderful resource this Forum, glad I found it a couple weeks ago. Outstanding replies all of you, thanks so much.
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Old 08-10-23, 07:46 AM
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you can match the old pattern by lacing 4 groups of 9 spokes at a time, and following the marks on the hub.

just do one goup (inner left, outer left, inner right, outer right) and you'll get there no problem

/markp
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Old 08-10-23, 07:55 AM
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Originally Posted by mpetry912
you can match the old pattern by lacing 4 groups of 9 spokes at a time, and following the marks on the hub.
I studied those hubs after posting my question yesterday evening, discerned there was a pattern to how the spoke marks were arrayed once I took Russ Roth's suggestion to heart and eyeballed each hub with the logo facing me directly. Pattern's subtle but it's there.

Aluminum's one of the metals that work-hardens from reshaping, I learned that a long time ago....
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