Go Back  Bike Forums > Bike Forums > Bicycle Mechanics
Reload this Page >

Lower Gearing for Ultegra 6603 Triple?

Notices
Bicycle Mechanics Broken bottom bracket? Tacoed wheel? If you're having problems with your bicycle, or just need help fixing a flat, drop in here for the latest on bicycle mechanics & bicycle maintenance.

Lower Gearing for Ultegra 6603 Triple?

Old 02-08-24, 11:16 PM
  #51  
Senior Member
 
Kontact's Avatar
 
Join Date: Apr 2011
Posts: 6,961
Mentioned: 41 Post(s)
Tagged: 0 Thread(s)
Quoted: 4340 Post(s)
Liked 1,528 Times in 997 Posts
Originally Posted by Carbonfiberboy
Too many people go by numbers. What does that even mean? Assuming one is smart enough not to go small-small. It works fine. I have a 10 speed FD on our tandem and a 9 speed on my singles, works just fine on both. On the tandem, I call out "spin it up" before the granny to middle shift, uh, not necessary on my single. Many tourers use a 24T granny and I've heard of 22T but not seen it.
The limit on front derailleurs is the height of the cage so it will shift over the big ring but the chain won't rub the bottom of the cage in the granny. If you have a big low cog in the back it will prevent the rubbing, but if you have the range cassette Shimano designed the RD-6603 to work with, but chain might drag even in the lowest rear cog.

So it might work if the OP is also changing the rear derailleur and cassette, If not, he is unlikely to be happy with trying to exceed the specs.
Kontact is offline  
Likes For Kontact:
Old 02-08-24, 11:30 PM
  #52  
Senior Member
 
Join Date: Apr 2017
Posts: 1,552
Mentioned: 7 Post(s)
Tagged: 0 Thread(s)
Quoted: 696 Post(s)
Liked 392 Times in 312 Posts
Originally Posted by Kontact
The limit on front derailleurs is the height of the cage so it will shift over the big ring but the chain won't rub the bottom of the cage in the granny. If you have a big low cog in the back it will prevent the rubbing, but if you have the range cassette Shimano designed the RD-6603 to work with, but chain might drag even in the lowest rear cog.

So it might work if the OP is also changing the rear derailleur and cassette, If not, he is unlikely to be happy with trying to exceed the specs.
+1. For that exact reason, I chose a triple front derailleur for my 1X to 2X conversion, as it's a wider range than past doubles, 50/34. The cassette is still 7 speed so I wanted use of all cogs on both chainrings for a quick shift, though I tend to favor lower cross-chained gears.
Duragrouch is online now  
Old 02-09-24, 09:07 AM
  #53  
just another gosling
 
Carbonfiberboy's Avatar
 
Join Date: Feb 2007
Location: Everett, WA
Posts: 19,528

Bikes: CoMo Speedster 2003, Trek 5200, CAAD 9, Fred 2004

Mentioned: 115 Post(s)
Tagged: 0 Thread(s)
Quoted: 3885 Post(s)
Liked 1,938 Times in 1,383 Posts
Originally Posted by Kontact
The limit on front derailleurs is the height of the cage so it will shift over the big ring but the chain won't rub the bottom of the cage in the granny. If you have a big low cog in the back it will prevent the rubbing, but if you have the range cassette Shimano designed the RD-6603 to work with, but chain might drag even in the lowest rear cog.

So it might work if the OP is also changing the rear derailleur and cassette, If not, he is unlikely to be happy with trying to exceed the specs.
That's only if one doesn't know how to use one's gears. I've been running my above suggestions for over a decade with no problems at all. It's a "fear this" thing, but there's nothing to fear. These chainring combinations are well known. Of course one could deliberately demonstrate that it's possible to rub the rear bar in the cage, but as I said above one would have to be an idiot to do that. I assume that no one here is an idiot. If one makes a shifting mistake, one would immediately hear the rubbing and correct the error. In 10s of thousands of miles, I've never done that. One simply adopts recommended shifting patterns and doesn't do extreme cross-chaining, which is totally unnecessary with a triple, just another advantage of that setup.
__________________
Results matter
Carbonfiberboy is offline  
Likes For Carbonfiberboy:
Old 02-09-24, 10:11 AM
  #54  
Full Member
Thread Starter
 
Join Date: Jul 2021
Posts: 222
Mentioned: 0 Post(s)
Tagged: 0 Thread(s)
Quoted: 152 Post(s)
Liked 28 Times in 22 Posts
Originally Posted by bocobiking
This rear derailleur works well with shimano 10speed setups, and you can use it with a 34tooth cog. I've done it.
I am assuming that you are talking about the RD-6603. Nice to know.
Steve_sr is offline  
Old 02-09-24, 10:21 AM
  #55  
just another gosling
 
Carbonfiberboy's Avatar
 
Join Date: Feb 2007
Location: Everett, WA
Posts: 19,528

Bikes: CoMo Speedster 2003, Trek 5200, CAAD 9, Fred 2004

Mentioned: 115 Post(s)
Tagged: 0 Thread(s)
Quoted: 3885 Post(s)
Liked 1,938 Times in 1,383 Posts
There's a theory of trying to reduce drivetrain wear. It says that for any particular choice of gear-inches (g.i.), one should run the largest combined tooth count one can which creates said g.i., while also avoiding cross-chaining. The idea is that spreading out the chain's application of force over more teeth reduces the force on each link as well as on each tooth. For instance we can get 88 g.i. by using 39X12 or 52X16. By this theory the 52X16 would be preferred. That's an easy one. It's also easy to show that many times the highest tooth count results from cross-chaining, so some choices are involved. I think in general, low tooth counts are worse than cross chaining with modern narrow chains. So that's some vague guidance on what to do with that chain. That said, my general preferences of ring/cog combos on a triple were expressed in post 43, which sorta correlates with this theory of drivetrain wear..
__________________
Results matter
Carbonfiberboy is offline  
Old 02-09-24, 10:38 AM
  #56  
Full Member
Thread Starter
 
Join Date: Jul 2021
Posts: 222
Mentioned: 0 Post(s)
Tagged: 0 Thread(s)
Quoted: 152 Post(s)
Liked 28 Times in 22 Posts
Right now I am leaning toward changing out the crank rings as a permanent change since I rarely use the big ring anyway. However, this all depends on being able to find the correct parts, the big ring being the hardest to find.

Originally Posted by Kontact
That 46T chainring is designed to mount on a FC-7800 crankset, and was sold as an accessory rather than packaged as a crankset. So it is a replacement for the 53T the crankset came with or for a crank that came without rings. It will mount on your crank.
Finding a big ring might be easier if I had the Shimano part number to go with it. I managed to find the Shimano documentation for the standard FC-7800 and FC-7803 triple! Do you know where Shimano listed these "accessory" parts since they are not listed with the regular cranksets?

Originally Posted by Kontact
So will many aftermarket rings:
I am not familiar with the bike parts aftermarket and QBP got rid of their web access for end users. Can you give me some AM manufacturers to look at may have the rings that I am looking for?

Originally Posted by Kontact
I was a shop mechanic and service manager for a very long time. I'm speaking from a lot of experience.
Yes, thanks so much for your assistance! Once I got usable bikes I haven't seen much use in upgrading to the latest gizmo so my limited bike knowledge is now pretty ancient by today's standards. I used to get a lot of good information from rec.bikes.tech in USENET but gave that up when my new ISP couldn't manage a news server. Now they can barely handle email! LOL
Steve_sr is offline  
Old 02-09-24, 10:54 AM
  #57  
aka: Dr. Cannondale
 
rccardr's Avatar
 
Join Date: Jul 2009
Posts: 7,726
Mentioned: 234 Post(s)
Tagged: 0 Thread(s)
Quoted: 2152 Post(s)
Liked 3,401 Times in 1,203 Posts
As has been said above, you don’t need to use Shimano, or for that matter, any particular brand of rings as long as the bolt count (5) and BCD are correct.
It is not at all difficult to find good big rings from various manufacturers that are pinned, or excellent middle rings and grannys of the desired tooth counts.
Personally, on my triples (which are typically used for touring) I use a 48/36/24 combination as it works well for me with a 12-34 or 11-34 cassette.
Switching out the rings is not difficult and if you wind up wanting to move the inner rings around a little there are thin spacers available to tune them precisely.
__________________
Hard at work in the Secret Underground Laboratory...
rccardr is offline  
Old 02-09-24, 11:23 AM
  #58  
Mad bike riding scientist
 
cyccommute's Avatar
 
Join Date: Nov 2004
Location: Denver, CO
Posts: 27,342

Bikes: Some silver ones, a red one, a black and orange one, and a few titanium ones

Mentioned: 152 Post(s)
Tagged: 1 Thread(s)
Quoted: 6200 Post(s)
Liked 4,204 Times in 2,358 Posts
Originally Posted by base2
I think your problem with a triple in the front will be the total capacity of the derailleur. As noted, you are already over the max cog size by 3 teeth.
Derailer capacity is, like many things bicycle, conservative. The max cog is usually fairly set but the ability to wrap is far greater than Shimano says it is. I for example am using a XTR to shift a 11-36 cassette mated to a 44/34/20 crank. Shimano says that can’t work but it works just fine.

But yeah. A mountain triple crank set is probably your cheapest option with a 22 or 24 tooth small ring would get you up the hills as long as you aren't in much of a hurry with that 42 tooth big ring.
That’s also a good option and the way I went. I use a 44 outer chain ring but a 42 would also work. Honestly a 52/11 gearing that gives a 129” gear is getting up into the super human category of gearing. I read something once that Miguel Indurain won the Tour de France on a bike with a 110” high gear.

Originally Posted by Steve_sr
Hello,

This question may test your long-term memory a bit! I have a road bike with a Shimano Ultegra 6603 triple setup. The current gearing goes down to 30:30 or 1:1. I am doing some touring this summer in Europe where there may be considerable steep sections where this now 67 year old could use a bit lower gearing.

I am thinking that the best option might be to put a larger cassette on the back. I currently have a 12-30 on there which I think is the largest that Shimano intended to run. I am wondering if anyone knows if it is possible to put a larger cassette on there and if so how far I can go and still have decent shifter performance. I am thinking that a 34 might be enough.

Your thoughts?

Thanks,
Steve
There’s a couple of ways to go. Perhaps the cheapest is to go with a Wolftooth RoadLink and a cassette with a 32 or 34 low gear. I’m running a RoadLink with an XTR rear derailer and a 36 tooth low. The XTR wasn’t quite up to the 36 but it is a very old XTR.

I’m going to assume that your crank is an external bearing but this would work with other bearing configurations. You can easily put on a mountain bike crank with smaller rings. A 44/34/22 crank does provide a nice high and a nice low. If the 44 tooth is too small and your derailer has chainstay interference problems, you can go to a 46 or 48 tooth outer and still keep the 22 inner. You’ll need to move spacers on an external bottom bracket for the road front derailer to work properly…move all the spacers to the nondrive side…but that is minor. If you have a different bottom bracket configuration, you may need to shorten the spindle.

Here’s a couple of examples. The black Cannondale has a 44/34/22 Deore crank and an 11-34 cassette. It’s shifted by Ultegra 9 speed shifters but your 10s will work on that configuration.



This is my touring bike with a 44/34/20 (yes, 20 tooth inner) and an 11-36 cassette. That gives me this gear combination with a 15” low and a 110” high. Below is a close up of the gearing where you can see the road link. By the way, a 20 tooth chainwheel can be used but some file work is required on the inner chain ring mounts to make it work.


__________________
Stuart Black
Plan Epsilon Around Lake Michigan in the era of Covid
Old School…When It Wasn’t Ancient bikepacking
Gold Fever Three days of dirt in Colorado
Pokin' around the Poconos A cold ride around Lake Erie
Dinosaurs in Colorado A mountain bike guide to the Purgatory Canyon dinosaur trackway
Solo Without Pie. The search for pie in the Midwest.
Picking the Scablands. Washington and Oregon, 2005. Pie and spiders on the Columbia River!



cyccommute is offline  
Old 02-09-24, 11:48 AM
  #59  
Senior Member
 
70sSanO's Avatar
 
Join Date: Feb 2015
Location: Mission Viejo
Posts: 5,801

Bikes: 1986 Cannondale SR400 (Flat bar commuter), 1988 Cannondale Criterium XTR, 1992 Serotta T-Max, 1995 Trek 970

Mentioned: 20 Post(s)
Tagged: 0 Thread(s)
Quoted: 1943 Post(s)
Liked 2,164 Times in 1,323 Posts
You can generally get whatever chainring you want from TA Specialties.

Non Shimano/non-matched rings work. You just need to be able to shift the chainrings correctly; not under load. Heck, I’ve used flat rings with STI’s.

If you really want to swap out a crankset with a mtb crank, you need to be able to dial in the road chainline. It can be done easier with some BB’s than others.

My top gear is 48-14, I tracked down some 14t 1st position cogs, and there are times I miss another cog or two. But as I age it bothers me less. I am not suggesting that you do this.

If your middle ring is your all purpose riding ring, then set your bike up for that one, you might be able to hit all 10 cogs while in the middle. Then the low chainring for climbing, and finally the outer ring for those long stretches of open road.

John
70sSanO is offline  
Old 02-09-24, 12:11 PM
  #60  
bocobiking
 
Join Date: May 2015
Location: Louisville, Colorado
Posts: 133

Bikes: 1974 Schwinn Paramount, 1974 Raleigh Super Course, 1984 Columbine, 1979 Richard Sachs, 2003 Serotta Legend Ti, 2005 Serotta Concours

Mentioned: 2 Post(s)
Tagged: 0 Thread(s)
Quoted: 68 Post(s)
Liked 46 Times in 28 Posts
Originally Posted by Steve_sr
I am assuming that you are talking about the RD-6603. Nice to know.
Oops! I forgot to attach the rear derailleur I was talking about. Here it is: RD-M591 Rear Derailleur – Mike's Bikes (mikesbikes.com)
bocobiking is offline  
Old 02-09-24, 02:17 PM
  #61  
Full Member
Thread Starter
 
Join Date: Jul 2021
Posts: 222
Mentioned: 0 Post(s)
Tagged: 0 Thread(s)
Quoted: 152 Post(s)
Liked 28 Times in 22 Posts
Originally Posted by 70sSanO
You can generally get whatever chainring you want from TA Specialties.
Well, I found TA Specialties website, Unfortunately, it is in French and I don't speak french and Google is not offering to translate it!

After some more searching I found the Bike24 (located in France) website that is in English and I think that I found the rings that I need. The outer big ring 46T in TA Alize and the inner 24T Zelito. Now the only issue is to find a source for these in the States or a EU source that ships here for a reasonable cost. Any suggestions?

Originally Posted by 70sSanO
If your middle ring is your all purpose riding ring, then set your bike up for that one, you might be able to hit all 10 cogs while in the middle. Then the low chainring for climbing, and finally the outer ring for those long stretches of open road.
This is what i have now on the middle ring. I can hit all 10 cogs. If I can find these rings it seems like that should work. I also like that it keeps the gap between steps rather small on the rear by keeping the 12-30. I guess that you could call this setup a "Compact Triple For Old Folks"! lol

Thanks,
Steve
Steve_sr is offline  
Old 02-09-24, 03:25 PM
  #62  
Senior Member
 
Join Date: Jan 2009
Location: San Diego, CA
Posts: 3,665
Mentioned: 10 Post(s)
Tagged: 0 Thread(s)
Quoted: 836 Post(s)
Liked 1,059 Times in 743 Posts
Originally Posted by Steve_sr
Well, I found TA Specialties website, Unfortunately, it is in French and I don't speak french and Google is not offering to translate it!

After some more searching I found the Bike24 (located in France) website that is in English and I think that I found the rings that I need. The outer big ring 46T in TA Alize and the inner 24T Zelito. Now the only issue is to find a source for these in the States or a EU source that ships here for a reasonable cost. Any suggestions
Try here for a USA seller. peterwhitecycles.com/tach.php#zephyr A mind boggling variety of rings but narrow it down to Shimano 10 speed and correct bolt size 110, 130 etc. and it narrows it down considerably. Usually 2 or 3 different levels of durability for each size and price determines which is best.

Last edited by Crankycrank; 02-09-24 at 03:29 PM.
Crankycrank is offline  
Likes For Crankycrank:
Old 02-09-24, 04:18 PM
  #63  
Senior Member
 
Join Date: Jul 2020
Location: Humboldt County, CA
Posts: 832
Mentioned: 7 Post(s)
Tagged: 0 Thread(s)
Quoted: 405 Post(s)
Likes: 0
Liked 430 Times in 286 Posts
If you're going for a 46Tx130mm, with shift aids, I'd say go for the Sugino. Really well made, quite a bit cheaper than the TAs, albeit not as pretty. (Nothing is... TA parts are gorgeous, but you'll pay for it.) Where TA rings really come into the conversation is if you want a weird tooth count, like an odd number that isn't 53, 45, or 39, or if you want the absolute smallest chainring for your BCD. (41x144, 38x130, 33x110)

--Shannon
ShannonM is offline  
Old 02-09-24, 08:52 PM
  #64  
Senior Member
 
Kontact's Avatar
 
Join Date: Apr 2011
Posts: 6,961
Mentioned: 41 Post(s)
Tagged: 0 Thread(s)
Quoted: 4340 Post(s)
Liked 1,528 Times in 997 Posts
Originally Posted by Carbonfiberboy
That's only if one doesn't know how to use one's gears. I've been running my above suggestions for over a decade with no problems at all. It's a "fear this" thing, but there's nothing to fear. These chainring combinations are well known. Of course one could deliberately demonstrate that it's possible to rub the rear bar in the cage, but as I said above one would have to be an idiot to do that. I assume that no one here is an idiot. If one makes a shifting mistake, one would immediately hear the rubbing and correct the error. In 10s of thousands of miles, I've never done that. One simply adopts recommended shifting patterns and doesn't do extreme cross-chaining, which is totally unnecessary with a triple, just another advantage of that setup.
Yeah, you got it to work by combining it with a totally different cassette and rear derailleur. But you are ignoring that the OP is not going to put 40t cog on his road bike, or replace his rear derailleur. If he sticks with a 28T low in back, that front derailleur is going to rub if you go to a smaller granny.

I get your suggestion and experience, but it doesn't work in a vacuum.

Originally Posted by Steve_sr
Right now I am leaning toward changing out the crank rings as a permanent change since I rarely use the big ring anyway. However, this all depends on being able to find the correct parts, the big ring being the hardest to find.

Finding a big ring might be easier if I had the Shimano part number to go with it. I managed to find the Shimano documentation for the standard FC-7800 and FC-7803 triple! Do you know where Shimano listed these "accessory" parts since they are not listed with the regular cranksets?

I am not familiar with the bike parts aftermarket and QBP got rid of their web access for end users. Can you give me some AM manufacturers to look at may have the rings that I am looking for?
I'm not sure why you are concerned with what kind of chainrings Shimano stopped making 15 years ago. If you want to find out, see if you can find images of old catalogs.

The solution to your chainring quest is to search for "130 BCD chainring" + whatever. (Your inner granny ring is 74 BCD). That will give you a selection of middle and outer chainrings compatible with your crank from all manufacturers. The only this to be aware of is some rings are made for cranks with one of the chainring bolts hidden under the crankarm. Some aftermarket rings are built to be mounted either way, and most are just like yours.

You will see rings from many makers, including old stock Shimano. For current aftermarket, Praxis makes nice stuff. You might value those rings with special teeth and lifters for better shifting, but if you are making a change to a smaller outer ring, you will find that even unramped rings shift very well when they have less difference from the middle ring.
Kontact is offline  
Likes For Kontact:
Old 02-09-24, 09:47 PM
  #65  
Senior Member
 
Join Date: Apr 2017
Posts: 1,552
Mentioned: 7 Post(s)
Tagged: 0 Thread(s)
Quoted: 696 Post(s)
Liked 392 Times in 312 Posts
I think if you're replacing all three chainrings, a whole new crank may be the same price, might even come with external BB bearings. Big thing to watch out for is Q-factor, I prefer a narrower Q to some mountain cranks. Then again, that lovely 5 bolt retro crank, not sure you can find a new one that nice looking. Possibly SRAM. For example, only a double, but look at this deal, 5x130 hollowtech II style with BB bearings, 53/39, $55 complete:

https://www.amazon.com/BOLANY-Cranks...dp/B0BDFG11JJ/

But I'm not turning up any road triples with lower than 30T inner.

If you want something special, sometimes ya gotta create it yourself.

Last edited by Duragrouch; 02-09-24 at 10:16 PM.
Duragrouch is online now  
Old 02-09-24, 10:55 PM
  #66  
aka: Dr. Cannondale
 
rccardr's Avatar
 
Join Date: Jul 2009
Posts: 7,726
Mentioned: 234 Post(s)
Tagged: 0 Thread(s)
Quoted: 2152 Post(s)
Liked 3,401 Times in 1,203 Posts
Question: Seems to me that Shimano made some later road triples where the granny ring was attached to the middle ring, not directly to the crank arm.
If so, that means the OP is wedded to a 39 tooth middle ring.

Please correct me if my memory has failed.
__________________
Hard at work in the Secret Underground Laboratory...
rccardr is offline  
Old 02-09-24, 11:23 PM
  #67  
Senior Member
 
Join Date: Apr 2017
Posts: 1,552
Mentioned: 7 Post(s)
Tagged: 0 Thread(s)
Quoted: 696 Post(s)
Liked 392 Times in 312 Posts
Originally Posted by rccardr
Question: Seems to me that Shimano made some later road triples where the granny ring was attached to the middle ring, not directly to the crank arm.
If so, that means the OP is wedded to a 39 tooth middle ring.

Please correct me if my memory has failed.
Not certain, but you may be right. However, if the middle ring sits on "ledges" to center the ring, then tabs to hold the inner would have to be in between the bolts for the middle, which would be more laterally flexy. Unless, the middle ring was thicker at the bolt holes and machined to engage both the middle ledges, and have tabs for the inner.
Duragrouch is online now  
Old 02-09-24, 11:48 PM
  #68  
Senior Member
 
Kontact's Avatar
 
Join Date: Apr 2011
Posts: 6,961
Mentioned: 41 Post(s)
Tagged: 0 Thread(s)
Quoted: 4340 Post(s)
Liked 1,528 Times in 997 Posts
Originally Posted by rccardr
Question: Seems to me that Shimano made some later road triples where the granny ring was attached to the middle ring, not directly to the crank arm.
If so, that means the OP is wedded to a 39 tooth middle ring.

Please correct me if my memory has failed.
This image was easy to find:

Kontact is offline  
Old 02-10-24, 12:30 AM
  #69  
Senior Member
 
Kontact's Avatar
 
Join Date: Apr 2011
Posts: 6,961
Mentioned: 41 Post(s)
Tagged: 0 Thread(s)
Quoted: 4340 Post(s)
Liked 1,528 Times in 997 Posts
Steve_sr, here''s a packaged 6603 that shows some of the chainring combos on the top of the packaging:

Kontact is offline  
Old 02-10-24, 02:39 AM
  #70  
Senior Member
 
Join Date: Apr 2017
Posts: 1,552
Mentioned: 7 Post(s)
Tagged: 0 Thread(s)
Quoted: 696 Post(s)
Liked 392 Times in 312 Posts
Originally Posted by Kontact
This image was easy to find:

Like the martians say on sesame street, "Nope-nope-nope-nope-nope-nope..." I see cast-in raised bosses for the inner ring bolts, as well as bolts for the middle ring. If the inner were bolted to the middle, you wouldn't have those cast bolting points for the inner.

Not saying that the example doesn't exist, just that pic isn't it.
Duragrouch is online now  
Old 02-10-24, 10:29 AM
  #71  
Senior Member
 
Kontact's Avatar
 
Join Date: Apr 2011
Posts: 6,961
Mentioned: 41 Post(s)
Tagged: 0 Thread(s)
Quoted: 4340 Post(s)
Liked 1,528 Times in 997 Posts
Originally Posted by Duragrouch
Like the martians say on sesame street, "Nope-nope-nope-nope-nope-nope..." I see cast-in raised bosses for the inner ring bolts, as well as bolts for the middle ring. If the inner were bolted to the middle, you wouldn't have those cast bolting points for the inner.

Not saying that the example doesn't exist, just that pic isn't it.
Well, yeah. I posted that photo to refute the idea that the granny is connected to the middle ring.
Kontact is offline  
Old 02-10-24, 11:47 AM
  #72  
just another gosling
 
Carbonfiberboy's Avatar
 
Join Date: Feb 2007
Location: Everett, WA
Posts: 19,528

Bikes: CoMo Speedster 2003, Trek 5200, CAAD 9, Fred 2004

Mentioned: 115 Post(s)
Tagged: 0 Thread(s)
Quoted: 3885 Post(s)
Liked 1,938 Times in 1,383 Posts
This isn't complicated at all. Touring in possibly steep terrain? How steep? Ask the tour leader. The OP is not carrying anything more that we carry on a normal day ride. IOW, what he will experience on tour, he can easily duplicate on an ordinary day ride here, assuming he has access to similar terrain. So if he hasn't already ordered a 26, why not? Slap it on, go ride terrain. See what happens. Then fool around with other options if necessary. For sure, the OP will want to ride with the rest of the group, and not penalize himself with a drivetrain which ensures that he won't be able to.

Back when I was 67, my wife an I did a solo tandem tour in the Czech Republic, fully loaded, camping, with the same gearing we use here for ordinary day rides, and my wife is not a strong rider. Only change was that I built a rear wheel with a drum brake. Back then we had a 11-36 cassette. We spent more time in lower gears, but we also used the big ring a lot. The route I plotted was on side roads and bike trails, just up and down all day long, 450 miles of that, no support, no problems, we had a blast. We did get noticeably stronger, fun when we got back.
__________________
Results matter
Carbonfiberboy is offline  
Old 02-10-24, 04:41 PM
  #73  
aka: Dr. Cannondale
 
rccardr's Avatar
 
Join Date: Jul 2009
Posts: 7,726
Mentioned: 234 Post(s)
Tagged: 0 Thread(s)
Quoted: 2152 Post(s)
Liked 3,401 Times in 1,203 Posts
My bad. It’s apparently the 6703 crankset that has the granny bolted to the middle ring.
Again, please correct me if inaccurate.
__________________
Hard at work in the Secret Underground Laboratory...
rccardr is offline  
Old 02-10-24, 06:14 PM
  #74  
WGB
 
WGB's Avatar
 
Join Date: Jul 2017
Location: Niagara Region
Posts: 2,913

Bikes: Panasonic PT-4500

Mentioned: 46 Post(s)
Tagged: 0 Thread(s)
Quoted: 1794 Post(s)
Liked 2,328 Times in 1,375 Posts
Re: using a Wolf Tooth adapter

I had thought of using one to allow for larger cogs but I have never owned a bike with over 8 speeds. I checked the Wolf Tooth website and they show adapters for 10/11 speed. In this thread there's talk of using the adapters with a 9 speed.

Does anyone know if a Wolf Link will work with an 8 speed???
WGB is online now  
Old 02-10-24, 08:09 PM
  #75  
Full Member
Thread Starter
 
Join Date: Jul 2021
Posts: 222
Mentioned: 0 Post(s)
Tagged: 0 Thread(s)
Quoted: 152 Post(s)
Liked 28 Times in 22 Posts
Originally Posted by Kontact
I'm not sure why you are concerned with what kind of chainrings Shimano stopped making 15 years ago. If you want to find out, see if you can find images of old catalogs.
I am not but I thought that it would be good place to start looking. Sometimes if you plug in a specific OEM part number Google will find AM equivalents.

Originally Posted by Kontact
The solution to your chainring quest is to search for "130 BCD chainring" + whatever. (Your inner granny ring is 74 BCD). That will give you a selection of middle and outer chainrings compatible with your crank from all manufacturers. The only this to be aware of is some rings are made for cranks with one of the chainring bolts hidden under the crankarm. Some aftermarket rings are built to be mounted either way, and most are just like yours.

You will see rings from many makers, including old stock Shimano. For current aftermarket, Praxis makes nice stuff. You might value those rings with special teeth and lifters for better shifting, but if you are making a change to a smaller outer ring, you will find that even unramped rings shift very well when they have less difference from the middle ring.
Well, I just spent an hour or so surfing Sugino's website and it appears that either they have gotten out of or never had 10-speed rings with 130PCD. All of their stuff is 110PCD. The only 130PCD were 7-8 speed rings.

Praxis is next on my list but probably not tonight. Tomorrow is supposed to be a rain day so no riding.
Steve_sr is offline  

Thread Tools
Search this Thread

Contact Us - Archive - Advertising - Cookie Policy - Privacy Statement - Terms of Service -

Copyright © 2024 MH Sub I, LLC dba Internet Brands. All rights reserved. Use of this site indicates your consent to the Terms of Use.