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Should you pull flip flop rear hub to the right first when truing like other rear whe

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Should you pull flip flop rear hub to the right first when truing like other rear whe

Old 02-19-24, 07:53 PM
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Should you pull flip flop rear hub to the right first when truing like other rear whe

Wondering what the best/easiest way to do this is. Can't find any info online

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Old 02-19-24, 07:54 PM
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Can you elaborate? Not sure what you’re asking here…
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Old 02-19-24, 08:09 PM
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Installing a rear wheel in a no tensioner (unlike a der) chain system is pretty much the same regardless of the hub. Pull the wheel back snug a side's axle nut. using your fingers between the rim/tire and the chainstay move the axle in the other side's dropout slot and start the easy process of "walking" the axle along the dropout slots one side at a time, snugging the loose nut and loosening the previous snug one until both the rim is centered between the stays and the chain just has zero tension at it's tight point. Andy
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Old 02-19-24, 08:25 PM
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If you are talking about building a double sided fix gear rear hub or fixed-free rear hub, you can build it just like a front wheel. Tighten both sides equally. Adjust the dish (or just check it if the hub flanges are indeed symmetrical) when you are say midway through the tightening. If you have a preferred sequence for front wheels, just use it.

Edit: I said "If you are talking about building ..." meaning lacing the wheel with spokes, tightening and truing. I am assuming that is what the OP is asking.
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Old 02-19-24, 09:21 PM
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Originally Posted by bboy314
Can you elaborate? Not sure what you’re asking here…
I mean when building a wheel with most rear wheels you pull it to the right first in truing stand
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Old 02-19-24, 10:00 PM
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For building a fixed gear/single speed wheel it would be generally even on both sides unless some odd case you don't want to it dished to either side as it is almost like a front wheel and if you ever want to flip it you will likely have issues. A FG/SS wheel is a restaurant where you want no dish.
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Old 02-19-24, 11:09 PM
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Originally Posted by veganbikes
For building a fixed gear/single speed wheel it would be generally even on both sides unless some odd case you don't want to it dished to either side as it is almost like a front wheel and if you ever want to flip it you will likely have issues. A FG/SS wheel is a restaurant where you want no dish.
I have a spacer on the track cog side because I don't plan on ever flipping. This is so I can get straight chainline. Does that change anything?
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Old 02-20-24, 06:38 PM
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Originally Posted by mauin1x
I have a spacer on the track cog side because I don't plan on ever flipping. This is so I can get straight chainline. Does that change anything?
Spacer? Like the Fix-T cover (or whatever it's called) from Halo? I doubt that would change anything unless you are spacing the axle out then that might cause issues but you wouldn't really need that.
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Old 02-20-24, 08:37 PM
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Originally Posted by veganbikes
Spacer? Like the Fix-T cover (or whatever it's called) from Halo? I doubt that would change anything unless you are spacing the axle out then that might cause issues but you wouldn't really need that.
Your not sending this guy to his lbs lol

Your a changed man or what lol
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Old 02-21-24, 11:08 AM
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Originally Posted by mauin1x
I mean when building a wheel with most rear wheels you pull it to the right first in truing stand
I think you are referring to the conventional wisdom that says you build to the higher tension side first. It does not apply to a symmetrical wheel.
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Old 02-21-24, 12:27 PM
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Go back to my post #4. Just build this like a front wheel. About half way through the tightening, true it side to side, check it with a dishing tool or simply turn it around in the stand. Correct the dish until the rim is centered as you finish tightening the spokes.

The majority of fix gear hubs have some dish. Virtually all single sided hubs and many or most fix-free. But the dish is so small it requires no more work than a front wheel. Even fronts should be checked as you build and a little tweaking is normal. Same here. Might take 3 or 4 extra turns to pull the rim to center. But done as you tighten, no extra work save two or three dish checks.

I love building fix gear wheels. So easy. And so strong, even when built with really light spokes. (I have no idea how many I've built but it has been for every one of my ~110,000 fix gear miles. And my city fix gear got new rims every two years - northwest lava dust road grit. Killer in winter with rim brakes. And yes, I always run and use two.) I've got a fix-fix wheel in the stand now.

I have three fix gear bikes. That city bike with a single sided hub and maybe 2mm dish, the bike of my avatar photo - double sided and no dish and my Mooney with its 126mm OLD spacing, a double sided fix-fix with 4mm of dish and lots of spacers. That bike runs a normal tiny cog on the dished out side and double cogs (21 and 17) on the dished in side. (There are three chainrings that line up with each of the three cogs for three very different gears. I've ridden it to and around Crater Lake without having to do any crazy pedaling.)
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Old 02-21-24, 12:42 PM
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Originally Posted by mauin1x
I have a spacer on the track cog side because I don't plan on ever flipping. This is so I can get straight chainline. Does that change anything?
Of course that spacer changes things. But who cares? You have to check that the rim is centered anyway. Just don't wait until the spokes are fully tight. Do it half way. (Yes, you can do it with the tight spokes but that is living life the hard way. And, sorry, no one is going to award you points for extra effort or rounded nipples.)

Oh, if you don't have a dishing tol and the stand doesn't provide a solid, repeatable location for the axle, use your bike as a dishing tool. Put the wheel in and slide it to hard against the end of the dropout or track end slot and tighten the nuts. Measure rim to chainstay on the left side. Now take the wheel out, flip it and put it in the same way. Measure again to the left chainstay. Should be identical. If not, just tighten one side as needed until it passes the test.

Don't sweat what you have to do to get chainlines, spacing, etc. Do what's needed, preferably before the wheel build. Then build a centered wheel. That simple.
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Old 02-21-24, 07:24 PM
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Originally Posted by Bike jambalaya
Your not sending this guy to his lbs lol

Your a changed man or what lol
No this is one where the OP gave info that could be used and then they responded to me and so I asked a question afterwards. You clearly are out of your element, Donny. (Watch The Big Lebowski if you don't get it)

This is a thread about truing wheels do you know what that is? If so can you actually contribute to this thread? If not I would suggest you gather your thoughts and write them on a piece of paper and file it away. Then I would give people a sense of what you need in terms of wheels in your other thread if you do not wish to follow good advice and lie. If so get back to the thread topic please!
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