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What Do I Do With Replacement Crank Set Grease Balls?

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What Do I Do With Replacement Crank Set Grease Balls?

Old 03-02-24, 04:57 AM
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Sounds like maybe it wasnít screwed in far enough? Which might mean you can get hold of some threading further in. Did you unwind the extractor bolt all the way at the start?

Iím slightly confused - the bike is old enough to have worn out the chainrings and the arm to have seized on to the crank spindle but too new to be in a database?

what are you trying to get from the database? Details of which bottom bracket it uses? Donít know if youíre going to be able to remove that with the arm still in the way.
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Old 03-02-24, 05:43 AM
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Originally Posted by Heat88
When I was using a puller to pull the old arms off, one came off fine, but with the other one, the puller pulled out and stripped the threads on the arm(but the puller is OK, it screws in to the other arm). Is there anything I can do besides get a new crankshaft? I'll have to pull out the crankshaft and see whats engraved on it to help me find a new one. What specs to I need to know? Is it possible to get just the shaft without any of the other hardware? The bike is a Schwinn Sidewinder.

Edit: I don't think it'll help because my bike is too new to be in a database, but here's the serial number: SNMNG11A9137. None of you are nerdy enough to be able decode the serial number are you? I think I found Schwinn's code book, but my serial number is too new to be in it.😥
Why does the post I made after this one need to be approved by a moderator?
There are other methods that can be used top remove the crank arm if the threads are stripped. Google "remove stripped bike crank arm" also search for threads on here as well.
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Old 03-02-24, 09:15 AM
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Oh - did you remove the crank bolt?
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Old 03-02-24, 09:21 AM
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Originally Posted by Heat88
When I was using a puller to pull the old arms off, one came off fine, but with the other one, the puller pulled out and stripped the threads on the arm(but the puller is OK, it screws in to the other arm). Is there anything I can do besides get a new crankshaft? I'll have to pull out the crankshaft and see whats engraved on it to help me find a new one. What specs to I need to know? Is it possible to get just the shaft without any of the other hardware? The bike is a Schwinn Sidewinder.

Edit: I don't think it'll help because my bike is too new to be in a database, but here's the serial number: SNMNG11A9137. None of you are nerdy enough to be able decode the serial number are you? I think I found Schwinn's code book, but my serial number is too new to be in it.😥
Why does the post I made after this one need to be approved by a moderator?
Unfortunately pulling all the threads out of the crank arm is a sort of common occurrence. It has to do with manufacturing tolerances and how stuck the crank arm was on the bottom bracket spindle taper. Whether or not any grease was used on the taper is a huge contributing factor. Grease will prevent galvanic corrosion between the steel spindle and the aluminum crank arm. In addition to this, the diameter of the threads the puller threads in to determine the quality of the interface between the tool and the part. Combine that with the quality of the aluminum casting the threads are cut and it will determine just how hard you can pull before failure.

A Schwinn Sidewinder, like all bikes made by Pacific Cycles is made to a price point. Unfortunately this also means pot metal, low manufacturing tolerances, and lack of grease throughout. A trifecta for problems. Fortunately, this also means that repair items are cheap, if you can steel yourself against all the hassle. Any bike shop will have a small selection of replacement crank arms hanging on a hook in the back room for situations like yours. Expect $15-30 or so.

As far as removing the stuck on arm, I've decided that the most effective method for removal is simply a hack saw with a good sharp blade. The aluminum, especially the low grade stuff gives way quite readily and it's about a 15 minute job to cut down in line coaxial with the spindle and along the taper. When your arm gets tired drive in a wedge to break off the rest of the uncut remaining at the fat end of the base. Then lever the arm off the spindle sideways. With only 3 of the four sides remaining with the spindle, the crank arm levers off quite easily.

Last edited by base2; 03-02-24 at 09:52 AM.
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Old 03-02-24, 10:15 AM
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Many people have stripped threads with a crank extractor as a consequence of forgetting to remove the crank bolt washer before threading in the extractor.
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Old 03-02-24, 10:25 AM
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Originally Posted by Trakhak
Many people have stripped threads with a crank extractor as a consequence of forgetting to remove the crank bolt washer before threading in the extractor.
Or not tightening the extractor head into the crank threads with a wrench.
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Old 03-02-24, 12:28 PM
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Originally Posted by choddo
Sounds like maybe it wasnít screwed in far enough? Which might mean you can get hold of some threading further in. Did you unwind the extractor bolt all the way at the start?
No, it was in far enough. Someone else here
suggested that it happened because the arm is made of aluminum.


Originally Posted by choddo
what are you trying to get from the database? Details of which bottom bracket it uses? Donít know if youíre going to be able to remove that with the arm still in the way.
If I had to get a a new crankshaft, maybe that would help with identifying the specs for it.
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Old 03-02-24, 12:29 PM
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Originally Posted by choddo
Iím slightly confused - the bike is old enough to have worn out the chainrings and the arm to have seized on to the crank spindle but too new to be in a database?
https://schwinnbikeforum. com/SLDB/serial.htm Maybe that page just hasn't been updated in a really long tome.
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Old 03-02-24, 12:32 PM
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Originally Posted by JoeTBM
There are other methods that can be used top remove the crank arm if the threads are stripped. Google "remove stripped bike crank arm" also search for threads on here as well.
I already found this video:
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Old 03-02-24, 12:34 PM
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Originally Posted by choddo
Oh - did you remove the crank bolt?
Yes
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Old 03-02-24, 12:41 PM
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Originally Posted by base2
A Schwinn Sidewinder, like all bikes made by Pacific Cycles is made to a price point. Unfortunately this also means pot metal, low manufacturing tolerances, and lack of grease throughout. A trifecta for problems. Fortunately, this also means that repair items are cheap, if you can steel yourself against all the hassle. Any bike shop will have a small selection of replacement crank arms hanging on a hook in the back room for situations like yours. Expect $15-30 or so.
I already have a new crankset bought, and was intending on installing it, so that's not an issue.

Originally Posted by base2
As far as removing the stuck on arm, I've decided that the most effective method for removal is simply a hack saw with a good sharp blade. The aluminum, especially the low grade stuff gives way quite readily and it's about a 15 minute job to cut down in line coaxial with the spindle and along the taper. When your arm gets tired drive in a wedge to break off the rest of the uncut remaining at the fat end of the base. Then lever the arm off the spindle sideways. With only 3 of the four sides remaining with the spindle, the crank arm levers off quite easily.
If all other avenues are exhausted, I'll probably do that.
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Old 03-02-24, 12:43 PM
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Originally Posted by Trakhak
Many people have stripped threads with a crank extractor as a consequence of forgetting to remove the crank bolt washer before threading in the extractor.
There are no washers in my case.
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Old 03-02-24, 12:50 PM
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Originally Posted by Kontact
Or not tightening the extractor head into the crank threads with a wrench.
No. It was in far enough. Aluminum crank arm vs steel puller was probably the cause. I actually didn't realize it was aluminum.
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Old 03-02-24, 01:09 PM
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Originally Posted by base2
The Titan Sub was a hack job by an idiot using expired carbon fiber in initial construction in compression the way that it is weakest with no initial or subsequent testing. Per his life wishes, he is now known for all the rules he's broken. Just the way he wanted. (It's a shame about the kid tho.)
I don't understand why anybody still has to do anything experimental with the basic design of deep sea subs anymore. Somebody figured it out 64 years ago when they built one that was able to go down to the Mariana Trench which is the deepest place in all of the oceans and 3 times deeper than where the Titanic is. There should be deep sea tours by now.
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Old 03-02-24, 01:39 PM
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Heat88

just loosent the bolt, ride around the block 2-3 times and when you come back the arm should be loose enough to pull off easily

/markp
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Old 03-02-24, 01:49 PM
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Originally Posted by Heat88
I don't understand why anybody still has to do anything experimental with the basic design of deep sea subs anymore. Somebody figured it out 64 years ago when they built one that was able to go down to the Mariana Trench which is the deepest place in all of the oceans and 3 times deeper than where the Titanic is. There should be deep sea tours by now.
I think if you try scaling up the Triesteís passenger sphere, and the air inside it, you run into a whole new world of engineering challenges.
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Old 03-02-24, 02:07 PM
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Originally Posted by Heat88
No. It was in far enough. Aluminum crank arm vs steel puller was probably the cause. I actually didn't realize it was aluminum.
Virtually all square taper cranks have aluminum threads. But it isn't a question of far enough, but tightening torque so all the threads share the load.

Your response leads me to believe you didn't tighten it with a wrench, which will lead to the threads being unevenly loaded so they tear out one at a time, kind of like breaking a stack of spaced boards with a karate chop.

In the decades that I have been a mechanic, I only damaged one crank with a puller - when I didn't tighten it down with a wrench. That was in 1990.
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Old 03-02-24, 02:27 PM
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Originally Posted by Heat88
I don't understand why anybody still has to do anything experimental with the basic design of deep sea subs anymore. Somebody figured it out 64 years ago when they built one that was able to go down to the Mariana Trench which is the deepest place in all of the oceans and 3 times deeper than where the Titanic is. There should be deep sea tours by now.
You mean like this one?








I was fortunate enough to be assigned to repair this thing on the ship that carries Alvin. https://m.youtube.com/watch?v=HMSkEz...ature=youtu.be

The problem is the way the forces scale. There is zero original components on this thing and it has been rebuilt a couple of times over. Here is a good history: https://www.whoi.edu/what-we-do/expl...tory-of-alvin/
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Old 03-03-24, 05:22 AM
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Originally Posted by Heat88
well that was one of the worse recommendations I have even seen.

Search on the site about using a "pickle fork" or a set of 'jacob's wedges". We have used both methods in our shop with great success and requires minimal effort.
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Old 03-03-24, 11:09 AM
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Originally Posted by JoeTBM
well that was one of the worse recommendations I have even seen.

Search on the site about using a "pickle fork" or a set of 'jacob's wedges". We have used both methods in our shop with great success and requires minimal effort.
That guy reminded me of Vinz Clortho, keymaster of Gozer, Volguus Zildrohoar, Lord of the Seboullia.
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Old 03-03-24, 11:23 AM
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Originally Posted by Kontact
Virtually all square taper cranks have aluminum threads. But it isn't a question of far enough, but tightening torque so all the threads share the load.

Your response leads me to believe you didn't tighten it with a wrench, which will lead to the threads being unevenly loaded so they tear out one at a time, kind of like breaking a stack of spaced boards with a karate chop.

In the decades that I have been a mechanic, I only damaged one crank with a puller - when I didn't tighten it down with a wrench. That was in 1990.
I used a crescent wrench.
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Old 03-03-24, 11:29 AM
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Originally Posted by Heat88
I used a crescent wrench.
And did you use the wrench to make it firmly tight?
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Old 03-03-24, 01:10 PM
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Originally Posted by Kontact
And did you use the wrench to make it firmly tight?
My guess, in the absence of clarification, is that he threaded the puller in by hand and then used the Crescent wrench to turn the puller's thrust bolt, inadvertently stripping the crank's threads.

That, or he accidentally cross-threaded the crank's threads when he threaded in the puller.

Or a previous removal attempt left the crank arm threads in a damaged state.

Can't think of any other possibilities offhand.
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Old 03-03-24, 04:04 PM
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Originally Posted by Trakhak
My guess, in the absence of clarification, is that he threaded the puller in by hand and then used the Crescent wrench to turn the puller's thrust bolt, inadvertently stripping the crank's threads.

That, or he accidentally cross-threaded the crank's threads when he threaded in the puller.

Or a previous removal attempt left the crank arm threads in a damaged state.

Can't think of any other possibilities offhand.
Which part is the thrust bolt? The black part or the other part? And its not the crank. Its the pedal arm. how did that strip anything? I'm confused.
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Old 03-03-24, 04:07 PM
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Originally Posted by Heat88
Which part is the thrust bolt? The black part or the other part? And its not the crank. Its the pedal arm. how did that strip anything? I'm confused.
The thrust bolt is the other half of the extractor tool. It's the inner part you turn to actually push against the spindle to force the crank off.
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