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I'm truly starting to hate my first time with Presta valves!

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I'm truly starting to hate my first time with Presta valves!

Old 08-27-05, 08:08 PM
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Kazooschu
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I'm truly starting to hate my first time with Presta valves!

Bought my Raleigh and the tires have Prader Valves. I find them to be a HUGE pain in the rear end!. Even with the little adapters. I have yet to find a tire guauge that works and my seem to have a slow leak. No matter how much I try to keep the hand pump on the adapter (even hooking my thumb over the tire) I can't get the dumb things up to 85 pounds. But since I have yet to find a tire guage that fits them or the adapter I have no idea of how much air is in my tires. I just know its not enough because they pancake a bit.

Problem is I live 35 miles from the bike shop so its not just a simple drop in.

Im convinced that I will forever prefer Shrader valves that I can easily fill and maintain at any quickstop with a 50 cent air machine.

Is it just me, or does anyone else share this sentiment?
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Old 08-27-05, 08:17 PM
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I'm assuming you are talking about presta?

I have liked my presta tubes since I first got them on a old road bike. I would not use adapters.. you are asking for headaches. Just get a decent bike pump and you will be set. I pump mine up to 110-120lbs no problem. Now if you are going to those quickstop places for the 50 cent air machines they are designed for car tires that only need around 40psi so might not get the pressure you need and since supply such a large amount of air at time you could easily blow out youre tube.. Sounse like you're main problem is with you're pump and trying to use adapters. Why not take your bike or atleast wheel to the bike shop , or ask them to try it on bikes they have there. Try it out when you find one you like buy it.
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Old 08-27-05, 08:24 PM
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I agree, lose the adapters. Spend a few bucks and get a proper bicycle pump with a gauge and a presta hose fitting. You will know exactly how much pressure you have, eliminate leaks and not have to take the bike to a "Quickstop". You will save $.50 with every fill-up and the pump will pay for itself pretty fast.

If the nearest bike shop is too far away, order on-line or by phone from Nashbar, Performance, etc. and have Fed Ex make the trip for you.
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Old 08-27-05, 08:29 PM
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The valve stem you are referring to is a Presta valve. Here's the hot ticket: Get a good quality pump that will work with presta valves. Make sure the pump has an accurate pressure gauge. You can get these from a well stocked bike shop or from Bike Nashbar (got mine for under $20, on sale), Perfomance Bike shop, Supergo or others. My pump has a double acting head that works equally well on presta or schraeder valves. It's Nashbar part no. NR-FP, check it out at www.nashbar.com . A good one will last for many years.

Forget schraeder to presta adapters! They are hokey and are useful only in an emergency. With the small air volume in the typical performance bike tire, seperate gauges are a bad idea: by the time you check your pressure, you've lost at least 5 psi.. On high pressure tires, you would lose at least 10 psi. That's why you use a pump with an integral gauge.

Better days are ahead for you!
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Old 08-28-05, 06:26 PM
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And a little trick; when you go to check your tires, unscrew the little securing nut and push the valve in with your finger briefly. Breaks the seal. Then put your pump head in place.
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Old 08-28-05, 06:53 PM
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In addition to all the great advice already given, don't use a hand pump for daily inflations. They are really designed for emergency use. The floor pump that everyone else has already convinced you to purchase is the right tool for properly inflating and maintaining your tires.
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Old 08-28-05, 06:56 PM
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Adapter works pretty good with compressed air where you only push the chuck on to the valve adapter(the valve, adapter and chuck are all straight in line). Other type chuck where you have to clamp it on, air tend to leak just as quick as you can put it(the valve, adapter and chuck are not always straight in line because the hose pulls it.). You'd better have a pump specific to presta at home.

It's good to have an adapter on your preata valve in case you need air and don't have a pump with you but there are gas stations on the way, as long as you are careful not to blow your tire with the high pressure.
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Old 08-28-05, 07:08 PM
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Originally Posted by allgoo19
It's good to have an adapter on your preata valve in case you need air and don't have a pump with you but there are gas stations on the way, as long as you are careful not to blow your tire with the high pressure.
He needs 85psi. Many service stations and convenience stores do not have their air compressors adjusted that high. What the OP needs is a floor pump with a built-in pressure gauge, as others have said.

A separate pressure gauge for a bicycle is a waste, by the time you check the pressure you've already lost another 5#.

Al
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Old 08-29-05, 01:19 PM
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Also, when you inflate your tires, make sure your valve is in the 12-O Clock postion. Secure the floor pump head by pressing straight up until you get an air seal. Inflate to desired pressure. hook two fingers around the "head" of the pump and pulll smartly downward. That way you don't pull the head off diagonally, potentially damaging the valve screw. Tighten the screw and ride. Forget those valve caps becasue the valve screw assembly sometimes bends a little bit. If it is bent and you place a valve cap on, you can create a slow leak. (They are just for show anyway).
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Old 08-29-05, 02:15 PM
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Is there an advantge to Presta valves? It seems like all the nicer bikes have them, is there a reason, or is it just "tradition"?

I'm about to get a "nicer" bike, and I'm wondering if it's worth buying a new pump for, or if I should just replace the tubes and keep going with my Schrader stuff.
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Old 08-29-05, 02:59 PM
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Narrower valve means smaller hole in rim= stronger rim. Valve is only held closed by air pressure, as opposed to spring in Schrader, so it is easier to pump. Schrader valves will not fit through Presta drilled rims.
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Old 08-29-05, 03:05 PM
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There are a lot of pumps available that have both Schrader and Presta heads. Buy one of those, and you won't have to worry about it! I've got a Pedro's and love it except that its garish green color aggravates my chromophobia.
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Old 08-29-05, 04:59 PM
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Schrader valves will not fit through Presta drilled rims.
Well I guess that's as compelling a reason as you'll find not to switch!
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Old 08-29-05, 09:20 PM
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I can't resist
There is actually a chance that the rims are drilled for Schrader and have a removable adapter plug to fit a presta valve. But by the time you buy new tubes and have the shop install them, you would have paid for a floor pump
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Old 08-29-05, 09:44 PM
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I'm probably the only one this has happened to but i've popped tires using the gas station pump (only 25 around here). that is another good reason to buy a floor pump. plus trying to get up to 85 psi is darn near impossible with a hand pump.
but what about the little compressed air cartridges, anyone have expereince with them?
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Old 08-29-05, 11:24 PM
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Originally Posted by allgoo19
Adapter works pretty good with compressed air where you only push the chuck on to the valve adapter(the valve, adapter and chuck are all straight in line). Other type chuck where you have to clamp it on, air tend to leak just as quick as you can put it(the valve, adapter and chuck are not always straight in line because the hose pulls it.). You'd better have a pump specific to presta at home.

It's good to have an adapter on your preata valve in case you need air and don't have a pump with you but there are gas stations on the way, as long as you are careful not to blow your tire with the high pressure.
yes I agree they work fine for a compressor. but once I wanted to check the pressure and such they don't work. byut the presta valves are harder to check with a gage though.
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Old 08-30-05, 02:54 AM
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Presta Valves are the most secure valves because the air is locked in the tube with threads instead of a spring ,as on schrader valves. Great advise from all the people ...
Get a shop quality floor pump, with presta, schrader, convertable head, and large display easy to read guage.Some pumps can go as high as 160PSI with no problem...
In my opinion the worse valve ever made is the British valve, used all over Japan on all those "MaMa Cherries" Shopping Bikes(mothers chariot). If you don't know about them consider your self lucky. Here in Japan they call the Schrader valve the American valve. And you can pull into any gas station and get
410 KPA (About 62 PSI) for your Mountian bike tires.They always say..." No, No, air for British valve" then they look and see that it is the same as a car valve and they freak out. "How did you get an American valve on your bike ?.". and I say... In america... we all use car valves on our bike unless using a presta valve. they they say...
domo go ziemas... or Thank you very much.
well good luck to all!
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Old 08-30-05, 08:36 AM
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But by the time you buy new tubes and have the shop install them
Hey, be nice! I might be clueless about the diameter of presta valve stems, but I can at least replace my own tubes!

I just always wondered what it was that was better about presta... I'll buy a pump.

Thanks!
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Old 08-30-05, 08:47 AM
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I have one of those CO2 cartidges for emergencies...cause there's nothing like sitting by the side of the road on your commute with a hand pump trying to get your 700x25s up to a decent pressure. Nothing like it, builds character, I say. One character building session, and those CO2 emergency pumps look really attractive.
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Old 08-30-05, 11:02 AM
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Originally Posted by Metro
Also, when you inflate your tires, make sure your valve is in the 12-O Clock postion. Secure the floor pump head by pressing straight up until you get an air seal. Inflate to desired pressure. hook two fingers around the "head" of the pump and pulll smartly downward. That way you don't pull the head off diagonally, potentially damaging the valve screw. Tighten the screw and ride. Forget those valve caps becasue the valve screw assembly sometimes bends a little bit. If it is bent and you place a valve cap on, you can create a slow leak. (They are just for show anyway).

I do that, but I either didn't know or remember why. Now I do, I guess.

I have adapters on my mountain bike tubes. They come in handy if a presta-compatible pump isn't available. Plus, much less pressure is needed for fat tires.
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Old 08-30-05, 11:48 AM
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Max, actually, the comment on relying on the shop to change a tube was really directed towards the OP which appears to require that. Yeah, I should have used the word "if", but it was not mean as a snuff to either of you. The "I can't resist" part referred to my own geeky nitpicking on the drilling of rims. CHeers
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Old 08-30-05, 12:42 PM
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No worries - that's why I used the smiley...
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Old 08-30-05, 01:59 PM
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Originally Posted by peterbarson
I'm probably the only one this has happened to but i've popped tires using the gas station pump (only 25 around here). that is another good reason to buy a floor pump. plus trying to get up to 85 psi is darn near impossible with a hand pump.
but what about the little compressed air cartridges, anyone have expereince with them?
A 16gr threaded CO2 cartridge can take a 700 x 23 road tire to 125, maybe 135 psi. CO2 leaks off faster than air and should be replaced with air after the ride.

Al
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Old 08-30-05, 03:23 PM
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Originally Posted by Al1943
CO2 leaks off faster than air and should be replaced with air after the ride.

Al
I kind of thought that might be true. Haven't had to use the CO2 enough to be sure though.
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Old 08-30-05, 03:35 PM
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CO2 does "leak" (actually it diffused through the rubber) faster than air.

I used to think CO2 would lose pressure slower than air since its molecular weight (44) is higher than air (28.8 average). However, it seems CO2 is more soluble in rubber than air and actually escapes faster.

The upshot is that when I have a flat tire on the road and inflate the tube with a CO2 cylinder, I bleed the tube down and refill it with my pump after I get home.
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