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Headset press

Old 11-29-05, 04:09 AM
  #1  
Lunigma
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hey i was wondering which head set press was better than the other:

Axiom this Axiom looks nice and im sure it's better than a rubber mallet

Cyclus this ones 5 bucks cheaper and looks cheaper, but who knows how it peforms.

park tools this park tools one kinda looks cheap and home made, but it's park tools
 
Old 11-29-05, 05:19 AM
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Or you could just make one using threaded rod, two large washers, and 2 nuts.
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Old 11-29-05, 05:24 AM
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Originally Posted by phantomcow2
Or you could just make one using threaded rod, two large washers, and 2 nuts.
yeah i was going to do that, but i got ahold of a really nice headset. and i don't want to ruin it. by the way i think that the park tools tool kinda looks like what you suggested, just nicer looking
 
Old 11-29-05, 05:38 AM
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Why do you think you'd ruin it?
If you're worried, try buying two thin rubber washers as well and place them between the metal ones and the cups.
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Old 11-29-05, 07:39 AM
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I have the Cyclus press. Used it probably 5 or 6 times and it works very well.
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Old 11-29-05, 07:39 AM
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The Park tool seems to be a commercial, somewhat more refined version of the homemade threaded rod with washers rig. The washers are shaped and perhaps padded to avoid distorting the cups. For one headset, I'd use the homemade version and, as recommended, put some soft washers on it.
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Old 11-29-05, 07:59 AM
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I use brass washers next to the headset on my homebuilt press. But I also look far any excuse to buy a new tool.
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Old 11-29-05, 08:13 AM
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I've got a new headset sitting on the work bench. I'm stopping on the way home to pick up a bolt, nut, and a couple of washers. Can anyone recommend the dimensions for a good homemade press? I'm thinking a 3/4" x 9" bolt with 1.5" washers. After the homemade cup remover worked so well, I'm feeling confident about my mechanical skills to put them back in.
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Old 11-29-05, 08:17 AM
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Consider This:

http://www.bikeforums.net/attachment...id=49121&stc=1

http://www.mindspring.com/~d.g1/headset.html

I made a similar version with 3/8" allthread, nuts, washers, and pvc couplers(instead of brass bushings).

I've used it many times without any problems or headset damage.

Last edited by wildjim; 11-29-05 at 09:52 AM.
 
Old 11-29-05, 08:41 AM
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Here's what I used:
The threaded rod is 20 mm in diam.

Worked perfectly. The cups went in like a hot knife through butter.
Total cost was equivalent to US$15, but then the rod is 1 m long...

Last edited by CdCf; 11-29-05 at 08:47 AM.
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Old 11-29-05, 09:24 AM
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Originally Posted by GTcommuter
I've got a new headset sitting on the work bench. I'm stopping on the way home to pick up a bolt, nut, and a couple of washers. Can anyone recommend the dimensions for a good homemade press? I'm thinking a 3/4" x 9" bolt with 1.5" washers. After the homemade cup remover worked so well, I'm feeling confident about my mechanical skills to put them back in.
Your bolt diameter is okay but I'd go with a piece of althread and two nuts instead. If you can find a pair of brass inserts, they work better than washers. I've used this sytem for years without problems but I did get a Park HHP-2 last year and I won't go back to the homemade press anytime soon. It like butta!
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Old 11-29-05, 10:09 AM
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I too have the Cyclus. It is heavy and well made. Really pretty nice. Works like a charm. I have BB facing tool as well. Same comment.
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Old 11-29-05, 11:21 AM
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I use the newest of the park ones on a regular basis. We used to have a 10 year old version of it untill I dropped it and it broke in half. Low and behold they warrantied it! As far as major shop tools and equipment, you cant beat park.
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Old 11-29-05, 02:52 PM
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A dead blow hammer and a block of wood has always worked so well for me that I can't justify buying a press or even making one.

I'll probably change my mind if I ever damage a light alloy cup or crack a head tube.
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Old 11-29-05, 03:15 PM
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Here's my $5 headset press. Never 'ruined' a headset using it, even those $120 sets...
Attached Images
File Type: jpg
Headset Press.jpg (17.2 KB, 50 views)

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Old 11-29-05, 05:36 PM
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I have under 4 dollars invested into mine, and have pressed in at leats 5 headsets. I used 3/8-16 threaded rod from home depot, 12 inch length i think. Then i got the largest diameter washer i could find, and just kept going down. Using a bit of duct tape, i taped them all together. Now with the largest washer i can find i always ensure there is pressure on the cup. If i was concerned, i would get rubber padding or brass like other posters suggested
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Old 11-29-05, 07:37 PM
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Darn ingenious. I am impressed with the resourcefulness of you all.

I've been using a bearing press designed for VW front bearings. But I've been using Allthreads for some stereo shelving and your designs make a lot of sense.

Now what do you guys use to install the lower bearing race on the forks?
I've been using an old Kalloy Uno 30.4mm seatpost which no one in this world ever uses except for old Supergo Access MTB frames.

I removed the seat clamp and then slide it over the steerer tube. It rests on the flats of the bearing race and I lightly tap on top of the seatpost to push the bearing race into position.
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Old 11-29-05, 08:36 PM
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Thanks for all the tips, guys. I was on the right track, but I never would have thought of the brass bushings. My inexpensive homemade press is well on its way to years of infrequent use.
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Old 11-29-05, 08:51 PM
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Originally Posted by squeegy200
Darn ingenious. I am impressed with the resourcefulness of you all.

I've been using a bearing press designed for VW front bearings. But I've been using Allthreads for some stereo shelving and your designs make a lot of sense.

Now what do you guys use to install the lower bearing race on the forks?
I've been using an old Kalloy Uno 30.4mm seatpost which no one in this world ever uses except for old Supergo Access MTB frames.

I removed the seat clamp and then slide it over the steerer tube. It rests on the flats of the bearing race and I lightly tap on top of the seatpost to push the bearing race into position.
Until I got the race setter from Park (again it's far superior but costly) I used a piece of copper drain pipe in either 1 1/4" or 1 1/2" depending on the size of the steerer. I sweated a cap on to it so that I could tap it more easily with a hammer.

To remove the cups, I cut an old steerer off of a broken fork, cut 4 slots in it with a dremel, flared the slots slightly and popped it into the head tube. It works just as well as the Park headset remover (the Park isn't superior to this one, just prettier )
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Old 12-01-05, 06:44 PM
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Originally Posted by Lunigma
yeah i was going to do that, but i got ahold of a really nice headset. and i don't want to ruin it. by the way i think that the park tools tool kinda looks like what you suggested, just nicer looking
Well, first off you aren't going to ruin it if you use large washers. Second - why on earth do you care what your headset press looks like??!!

What are you going to do with it - carry it around the mall to pick up women??
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Old 12-01-05, 06:47 PM
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Nashbar makes a fine headset press that I have been using for a few years now. If you wait they normally go on sale for about 45.00.
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