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Non-offset chainrings -what's your thoughts on turning them over?

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Non-offset chainrings -what's your thoughts on turning them over?

Old 02-03-06, 10:26 PM
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jeff williams
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Non-offset chainrings -what's your thoughts on turning them over?

..or reversing them? I run a 1-7 or 1-8 single chainring drive.
I wear chainrings a bit faster than a double or triple.
Last ring I bought, I flipped the non-offset ring with the last chain change.
The idea was that any wear would be on one side of the tooth and the reversal would extend the rings life.
It runs fine..but is this a real possibility or am I deluding myself as to extending the wear life.
I mentioned this to a mech and he said it was done by some track bike riders.

Thoughts....?
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Old 02-04-06, 01:13 AM
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It should work just fine. Look at how teeth wear and you'll see that there is a nice unworn surface on the other side of the worn teeth waiting to be exploited.

You could also rotate the rings around part of a turn since the wear is greatest with relation to a specific crank angle. Unbolt the ring and spin it as close to a half turn as you can (dang 5-bolt rings...) and put the greatest wear somewhere else for a while.
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Old 02-04-06, 10:46 AM
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Its the way to go. You can also do it with freewheel/cassette cogs, depending on the system, and get twice the life out of splined cogs (but not threaded cogs).
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Old 02-04-06, 01:13 PM
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Originally Posted by San Rensho
Its the way to go. You can also do it with freewheel/cassette cogs, depending on the system, and get twice the life out of splined cogs (but not threaded cogs).
Don't think it will work with Shimano cassette cogs. The splines have one wide and one narrow spline that won't match up right if they're the wrong way around.
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Old 02-04-06, 02:18 PM
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Originally Posted by Retro Grouch
Don't think it will work with Shimano cassette cogs. The splines have one wide and one narrow spline that won't match up right if they're the wrong way around.
Hence the "non-offset" in the subject line.
Actually, this works fine with chainrings with offset, too, if you don't mind fudging your chainline a few millimeters.
Basically, you get double the chainring life with the flip-it strategy, and when you're running only one chainring, there's no reason not to flip when the chainring gets worn and the chain starts skipping.
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Old 02-04-06, 02:33 PM
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Originally Posted by jeff williams
The idea was that any wear would be on one side of the tooth and the reversal would extend the rings life. It runs fine......
I think that is the most useful answer to your question. And, no, you aren't missing anything.
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Old 02-04-06, 03:22 PM
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Originally Posted by HillRider
I think that is the most useful answer to your question. And, no, you aren't missing anything.
I did it before any hooking\bad wear from a stretched chain.
My idea is to buy a Boone Ti chainring and do this. They are pretty expensive, 86$ US, but I should get years on the ring.
http://www.bikeforums.net/showthread...ighlight=boone

I'm not really in the know how a chains falls and lifts off the teeth, it was just one of my 'ideas'.
It's all this n' that until Sheldon stops by.
I might suggest that it's something to do -as I did, only when you install a new chain.

?

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Old 02-05-06, 11:41 AM
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Originally Posted by Retro Grouch
Don't think it will work with Shimano cassette cogs. The splines have one wide and one narrow spline that won't match up right if they're the wrong way around.
I have an old Sachs freewheel that was similar, there was an extra tab on the cog that only allowed it to go on one way, but a dremel tool and about 10 seconds,that tab was gone and I could flip the cogs.

Don't know about Shimano, however, it sounds like it would be easy to modify it also.
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Old 02-05-06, 01:37 PM
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Well, with old-school freewheel or cassette cogs, the teeth were symmetrical - the same from the left side or the right. So, provided you could take them off the freewheel and flip them around, you could get double the life.

Modern freewheel and cassette cogs have ramps built into them, and specialized variable tooth profiles, to facilitate shifting. It may still work to flip them around (I don't know if the variable tooth profiles will hurt shifting compared to a traditional symmetrical-tooth cog), but you at least lose the benefit of the quicker shifting provided by the ramped cogs.
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