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-   -   Chain, Chain Tool, Inexperience, DOH !! (https://www.bikeforums.net/bicycle-mechanics/18645-chain-chain-tool-inexperience-doh.html)

RollingGeek 12-11-02 10:54 AM

Chain, Chain Tool, Inexperience, DOH !!
 
So, just how bad off am I that I pushed a chain pin/rivet all the way through ?

I knew I had to be careful, just wanted that last turn of the tool and *ping*, out it came and bounced around the floor.

I could not figure out how to get it back in - should I just use this as an excuse to buy a new chain ?

roadbuzz 12-11-02 11:06 AM

With enough persistance, they can be re-inserted. But, if you still have a little piece leftover from your last chain replacement (you don't throw them away, do you?), you can remove back to the previous outer plate, and splice on a 1" fragment. Failing that, the chain might be a little long, and you could just remove 1" (back to the previous outer plate)... try wrapping it around the L-L combo before removing!

toolfreak 12-11-02 11:17 AM

Nope, just try again and put off another link :)
It will shorten the chain, and you can`t probably ride big-big anymore, but this is a wrong gear anyway.

:beer:

pokey 12-11-02 11:25 AM


Originally posted by toolfreak
Nope, just try again and put off another link :)
It will shorten the chain, and you can`t probably ride big-big anymore, but this is a wrong gear anyway.

:beer:

It may be wrong,but having the chain long enough for it is good 'just in case'. On a shimano 9 speed chain,you can use a sram 9 speed repalceable link for, and for other size chains,there are other aftermarket replaceable links that will work.

mike 12-11-02 01:44 PM

Toolfreak's suggestion to take off another link will work. It will work your drive train harder - your chain and chainrings will wear ever so slightly faster.

If you have the time and the patience, put the links in place (forget about the chain tool for a minute) and line up the holes. Put the pin in place. Use a pliers to press the pin into place. With the pliers, you should be able to get the pin in about 1/4 of the way or so. This is enough for you to then use the chain tool to get the pin in the rest of the way.

By the way, the repaired link is always a bit stiff. After you have the pin in place, grab the chain in both hands and work the chain near the link back and forth IN THE NON-BENDING SIDEWAYS DIRECTION. This will loosen the stiffness in the link.

Good luck!

a2psyklnut 12-11-02 02:40 PM

If it's a Shimano chain, you're supposed to pop the pin all the way out, and replace it with a new one. (each and every time) You're also supposed to not "break" the chain in the same place more than once. If you're using 9-speed, you need a silver pin, if 8-speed, it's black. Your LBS should have about 100 of each! We keep ours in a squeeze bottle. We go through a lot of these.

My recommendation is to get a SRAM Powerlink while you're at the LBS. This allows you to easily remove your chain w/o creating weak points on your chain. You know the old saying, "A chain is only as strong as it's weakest link." Each time you "break" a chain, you're stressing it.

I've heard of people having their Powerlink accidentally release, but I've been using one for as long as they've been available w/o any incidents.

Yes, you can use a SRAM Powerlink on a Shimano chain!

L8R

pokey 12-11-02 02:58 PM


Originally posted by a2psyklnut


Yes, you can use a SRAM Powerlink on a Shimano chain!

L8R

A 8 speed shimano chain is too wide for an 8 speed sram power link.There are others that will work.You are right about the shimano replacement pins.

VegasCyclist 12-11-02 07:13 PM


Originally posted by a2psyklnut
I've heard of people having their Powerlink accidentally release, but I've been using one for as long as they've been available w/o any incidents.
that's odd, I have power links on 3 bikes without any problems... and to release the powerlink you have to press the sides and move the chain together from both sides... not sure how you could do that while riding? (unless the plink was never put on correctly to start with)

RegularGuy 12-11-02 07:34 PM

Another possibility is the Missing Link by KMC. They connect a chain, but aren't really a master link. That is, they aren't meant to open to remove the chain.

RollingGeek 12-12-02 02:18 PM

Thanks for all the feedback.

I got the link back in - but it was pretty stiff. I took it in to the LBS to see what I did wrong, and he checked out the chain gap and it was definitely due for replacement anyway.

Oh well, I know for next time - but of course i hope there is not a next time ;)

Raiyn 12-12-02 02:43 PM


Originally posted by a2psyklnut

I've heard of people having their Powerlink accidentally release, but I've been using one for as long as they've been available w/o any incidents.

L8R

What kinda goofball had that happen? Aside from catastrophic failure they there's no reason for that (when properly installed)

khuon 12-12-02 07:44 PM


Originally posted by Raiyn
What kinda goofball had that happen? Aside from catastrophic failure they there's no reason for that (when properly installed)
The only possible situation I can think of in which a PowerLink might unintentionally come apart would be during shifting while pedalling backwards with a poorly lubed chain (because we know everyone does this often)... and then possibly not even. I've never had a problem with PowerLinks coming apart when they weren't supposed to. OTOH, I've had enough Shimano chain breakage that I've decided to replace them outright. It's easier maintenancewise too.

Raiyn 12-12-02 10:13 PM


Originally posted by khuon


The only possible situation I can think of in which a PowerLink might unintentionally come apart would be during shifting while pedalling backwards with a poorly lubed chain (because we know everyone does this often)... and then possibly not even.

Nope no good, the chain tension even then would be enough to hold it together.

gmason 12-13-02 01:26 AM


pedalling backwards
??? What kind of running gear requires that? And here I thought I was learning about this stuff. Always room for (much) more.

Cheers...Gary

khuon 12-13-02 02:20 AM


Originally posted by gmason

??? What kind of running gear requires that? And here I thought I was learning about this stuff. Always room for (much) more.

I never claimed it was something one might do often but there could be a situation whereby someone's ratcheting (possibly to clear an obstacle). Of course one would not attempt to shift while doing this but I imagine that the combination of attempting to shift while backpedalling could compress the PowerLink both logitudinally and laterally thereby causing a seperation of the sideplates... especially with a sticking unlubed chain. It's a longshot I realise.

gmason 12-13-02 02:25 AM

Whew. :p There is an amazing variety of stuff out there, so one never knows.

In fact, I have a vague recollection of reading about a very old setup for which you had to do just that. I think it was in The Dancing Chain, but I'm not sure. Now I will have to go look.

Cheers...Gary

Yan 03-25-08 02:54 AM

Last time I did this, it took me half an hour to get the pin back in.

gmason 03-25-08 07:54 AM


Almost six years?!

mark9950 03-26-08 09:48 AM


Toolfreak's suggestion to take off another link will work. It will work your drive train harder - your chain and chainrings will wear ever so slightly faster.
Than if thats the case what do I do to my single speed bike to prevent my drive train from working harder,I cant add another link because my chain will derail.

brett jerk 03-27-08 06:32 AM

I have a little story, that while embarassing, may be helpful:
When I started working on chains, it never occurred to me to do anything besides push the pin all the way out. The trick I figured out is that if you lay the chain on the floor, with the rollers completely visible, and put the chain tool underneath them (this may take a little bit of stacking stuff up etc depending on the size of your chain tool) and grab a set of tweezers, you should be able to get the pin lined up with the hole and be able to tighten the chan tool enough that itll be pushed against the link. At this point you want to take the tweezers out again and try to move the pin directly into the center of the hole (this may also require shifting the chain around and/or loosening the chain tool a little). Once thats done you should be able to crank it in. It's a frustrating experience that I have done at least a half a dozen times before I realized I didnt have to take the pin all the way out (DOH). Toothpicks can also be helpful.
I feel like the link is more likely to "bind" when doing this procedure, so make sure you press firmly while the rollers are mostly invisible (you should be able to read the logo on the links) and pull firmly back until it is loose.

Yan 03-27-08 10:21 PM

When I did this, I laid the chain on the ground, placed the pin on top, and hammered the pin with the chain tool until in was just snug enough to not fall out. Then, I very carefully placed the chain into the chain tool and got it in completely.

Took about 20 tries.

lopsided 03-28-08 04:38 PM

Forster super link from lickbike.com. problem solved.

TimJ 03-28-08 05:24 PM

Wow. How does a 6 year old question about a chain pin get resurrected anyway?


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