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-   -   Should I throw my pump away? (https://www.bikeforums.net/bicycle-mechanics/18722-should-i-throw-my-pump-away.html)

trmcgeehan 12-13-02 02:11 AM

Should I throw my pump away?
 
I carry a little portable pump on my bike, but our town's local bike guru says this marks me as a "newby." He says all I really need is one of those little CO-2 bottles you can buy from the bike catalogs for a few bucks each. This saves weight and space, he says, and gets the repaired tire up to 90 psi in an instant. Alot better than pumping your heart out for 5-10 minutes. Any thoughts on this? Should I do this? Or, should I be ultra-conservative and carry a pump and a CO-2?

chewa 12-13-02 02:55 AM

keep the pump.

Ed Holland 12-13-02 04:49 AM

I second Chewa - keep the pump. It is free to use and unless your arms wear out, you can fix as many flats as you have tubes and or patches.

Ed

greywolf 12-13-02 05:03 AM

their right, keep the pump, i dont know about your neck of the woods but here the cost of those little gas bottles is more than a new tube ! the salesman sounds a bit eager to make a sale to me?

MichaelW 12-13-02 05:34 AM

Carrying a pump marks you out as a cyclist who is prepared for multiple punctures.
CO2 bottles are really for racing, where the extra minute or 2 saved can make a difference. For training on your own, or just riding around, its better and cheaper to use your pump.

Bokkie 12-13-02 10:00 AM

My view from the left field. Would you rather drink a nice glass of cold beer, or have an aerosol that gives you a sniff of it instead?:D

Listen to us. Stick with the pump.

RegularGuy 12-13-02 10:57 AM

I think you should lose the pump.

Then, if you have a flat you can use a CO2 cartridge. It will only cost 75 cents or a dollar, a negligible sum, even compared to air which is basically free. Make sure you get the repair right the first time, because you only get one chance. If your patch doesn't hold, you will either need another cartridge or a ride home. When you're all done, be sure to add the empty cartridge to the world's already overflowing landfills. And pray, all the way home, that you don't have another flat.

At least you won't look like a newbie. :D

By the way, is my sarcasm showing? A wise person once said "If you meet the Buddha on the road, kill him." Who died and made your guru the style man? I'm sure that the guru actually has a lot of good things to teach you, but, this is a matter of style vs. security. Make up your own mind.

Richard D 12-13-02 11:03 AM

Pump :)

MsVicki 12-13-02 11:37 AM


Originally posted by RegularGuy
I think you should lose the pump.

Then, if you have a flat you can use a CO2 cartridge. It will only cost 75 cents or a dollar, a negligible sum, even compared to air which is basically free. Make sure you get the repair right the first time, because you only get one chance. If your patch doesn't hold, you will either need another cartridge or a ride home. When you're all done, be sure to add the empty cartridge to the world's already overflowing landfills. And pray, all the way home, that you don't have another flat.

At least you won't look like a newbie. :D



Ooooooh, sarcasm! I love it! Hehehe

Keep the pump!

SteveE 12-13-02 11:46 AM


Originally posted by trmcgeehan
... but our town's local bike guru says this marks me as a "newby." .
Complete and utter BS! To the contrary, a pump will mark you as a grizzled veteran with many years of cycling under your belt.

roadbuzz 12-13-02 03:17 PM

Sounds like there are enough here that were failed by their CO2 cartridges (I had a full cartridge and a spare!) to make a convincing argument.

Pump.

uciflylow 12-13-02 04:09 PM

This is soo timly for me! I just dumped the co2 device and bought a nice frame pump. I was carying as many co2 cartrages as a pump weighs any how. I had a blown tube once and my back up leaked at the valve all the way home. I was sweeting it all the way in that I wouldn't run out of co2! I just bought the pump two days ago!:eek:

Hants Commuter 12-13-02 05:18 PM

If the CO2 cylinder isn't that big, why not carry both?

Ok I get to say this cos I've got something to put all this in but I've also been in the very embarrassing situation of my frame mounted pump breaking when I was trying to blow up a tyre.

WorldIRC 12-13-02 06:12 PM

I agree.

The CO2 pumps arent that big. Why dont you carry both of them. If you somehow manage to kill all of them, then you still have the pump at your disposal.

urban_assault 12-13-02 07:43 PM

Keep the pump.

You can help out another cyclist when they run out of co2 cartridges. Or help the guy who brought 4 co2 cartridges but forgot the head unit. D'oh!

A ...umm... friend of mine had those things happen to him.

;)

WorldIRC 12-13-02 08:05 PM

hehe I hate it when that happens. I've helped out a few people already.

Also, what if the CO2 pumps are defective.

uciflylow 12-13-02 08:18 PM

I also hear that dogs HATE frame pumps.:D

ChiefCatchacold 12-13-02 08:21 PM

1 Attachment(s)
Michael Barry, newbie.

roadbuzz 12-14-02 08:32 AM


Originally posted by Hants Commuter
Ok I get to say this cos I've got something to put all this in but I've also been in the very embarrassing situation of my frame mounted pump breaking when I was trying to blow up a tyre.
That's a good point. You can have problems with pumps, too. Here're some points to keep in mind if you use a frame pump.
Frame pump technique: When inflating the tire, support the pump head against a solid surface (fencepost, rock, etc.)... that is, don't push against the valve stem... you can break it off or damage the tube where the stem enters. And be careful when you remove the pump from the stem... same reason.
Make sure your pump is in working order: Once or twice a season, deflate your tire and pump it up to ride pressure with your frame pump. If you can't, repair or replace the pump. Once a year you should squirt a little silicone lubricant on a paper towel and run it up and down the inside of the pump barrel with a coat hanger or something. Wipe out the excess.
Be sure to get a frame pump that will allow you to actually inflate your tire to 100-120 psi. Some mini-pumps won't. Also, frame pumps that let you disable the spring-loaded head (that hold it in your frame) are easiest to use... Zefal HP-X or Topeak Road Master Blaster are two I know of off-hand that meet both criteria.

Another one from the "don't ask me how I know this" file.

Raiyn 12-14-02 03:22 PM


Originally posted by roadbuzz

Once a year you should squirt a little silicone lubricant on a paper towel and run it up and down the inside of the pump barrel with a coat hanger or something. Wipe out the excess.
.

KY Jelly works about as good in a pinch.

RegularGuy 12-14-02 03:34 PM


Originally posted by Raiyn
KY Jelly works about as good in a pinch.
I assume this is also from the "don't ask how I know this" file.

roadbuzz 12-14-02 11:19 PM


Originally posted by Raiyn
KY Jelly works about as good in a pinch.
That's, um, thinking outside the box.

Dirtgrinder 12-14-02 11:35 PM


Originally posted by roadbuzz

That's, um, thinking outside the box.

Good one Buzz! :D

John E 12-15-02 02:58 PM


Originally posted by SteveE

Complete and utter BS! To the contrary, a pump will mark you as a grizzled veteran with many years of cycling under your belt.

In fact, carrying a full-size frame-fit pump, such as a Blackburn, a Zefal HP-X, or a Campag.-headed Silca Impero (preferably colour-coordinated with your frame), really marks you as a veteran.

SteveE 12-15-02 08:25 PM

OMG, I've got both the Zefal HP-X and a color-coordinated Silca frame pump! And I've got that grizzled look! :D


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