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Open Pro/PT SL Wheel Build questions

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Open Pro/PT SL Wheel Build questions

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Old 10-15-06, 04:03 AM
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NomadVW 
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Open Pro/PT SL Wheel Build questions

Went up to my LBS today to tell him I have a Powertap SL in the mail and need to change out one of my ultegra hubs for the PT hub. He groaned and grimaced and basically said "I'm too busy to get that done for you." I was floored, but am left with a PT SL hub coming to me across the Pacific and if LBS #2 (which I've never been to before) falls through, I'm going to be building this crucial wheel myself for the first time.

Couple quick questions for sanity check while I am researching.

1. I've found the Mavic Open Pro ERD to be 605mm. I have the 2006 and 2005 versions of the wheel. Any difference in ERD's for these that I need to be aware of?

2. Based on that ERD and the PT hub sizes in their manual ( http://www.saris.com/pdfManuals/232.pdf ), I've used the UBI spoke calculator to come up with spoke lengths of 290.2mm (drive side, rounded down to 290) and 291.4 (non-drive side, rounded down to 291mm)

Can anyone confirm this for me? Any issues I should be aware of in building a PT wheel vs any other wheel? I'm going to tear apart my old ALX rims this week to practice if bike shop #2 falls through on me. God what I wouldn't do to be back in the states right now.
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Old 10-15-06, 05:23 AM
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Wil Davis
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I've checked your figures and came up with the same as you (290.2 and 291.4 for a x3 wheel) using the Spocalc Excel file (available from various places on the web).

Why not just get another rim and build a new wheel rather than destroy an existing wheel? …that way you will have a spare wheel, and can always revert to the original; after all, if this is your first attempt at building a wheel…

- Wil

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Old 10-15-06, 05:30 AM
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Honestly, until I started the shopping list for supplies at Nashbar, I didn't realize the Rim was as cheap as it is. I'm leaning more and more to doing this myself if for no other reason than learning how to do it and cutting the cost of the wheels significantly.

Basically $90 for the rim, spokes and spoke prep. I'll have to buy a truing stand, but that's nothin but a thang after the Powertap

Shoulda seen the look on the wife's face when I told her tonight that I bought the powertap two days ago.
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Old 10-15-06, 05:40 AM
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Good job! I applaud the fact that you're doing the work yourself. Wheelbuilding is fun, and isn't rocket science - what I'm saying is that I would tend to leave the existing wheels as they are, and build a new wheel. That way you still have an operational bike during the time you're building the new wheel; and if for some reason you don't like the new Power Tap version, you just sell the wheel (or the pieces) and you can still use the original wheel (without having to rebuild it).

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Old 10-15-06, 05:48 AM
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Well, either way I have two rear Mavic OP wheels already, so I was sure to have a wheel in the meantime. I'm extremely intimidated by the idea of lacing my own wheels.

I'll still pull apart the ALX rim I have because the hub is completely shot. This will give me something to practice on before putting the powertap on the new rim I have in my shopping cart.

What I SHOULD do, is pull the Ultegra hub off one of my OP wheels and put it on the ALX 295 rear wheel whose hub is shot. I've had the ALX rims in the box for about 6 months now due to the crap hub. Man.. this could become a new addiction, I can see it coming. My wife is going to hate me for this one.

Well.. anyway, looks like I'll just mess around with the hub that's on the ALX rim now. Just hit checkout on another open pro wheel. Soon I'll have the record. This will be three full rear open pro wheels. HAH.
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Old 10-15-06, 06:09 AM
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Well, I would recommend getting a copy of Gerd Shraner's "The Art of Wheelbuilding" - fabulous book, and very easy to understand. As I said before, it isn't rocket science. At a pinch, you can even get by without a truing-stand, but if you intend to build more than a couple of wheels, then a truing-stand is a good investment; along with a decent set of spoke-wrenches, and a nipple-driver, and a tensiometer…

Good Luck!

- Wil

PS: You might check out Roger Musson's "Wheelbuilding" which is available as an on-line download (check google)
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Old 10-15-06, 06:27 AM
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Picked up the ebook. Will wait for the shipment to make it to me in Japan to do much else. Delayed gratification sucks.
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Old 10-15-06, 06:34 AM
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If you are concerned about your wheel building skill, you could lace the new rim to the PT hub and start the truing process yourself. Then have it checked and the final adjustments and tensioning done by your LBS. That way you get some experience and the LBS only needs to put a relatively small amount of time into the project as you will have done the slow parts.

Same drill with switching the Ultegra hub to your other rim and spokes. Do the disassembly of the current wheel, lace the hub to the other rim and start the truing/tensioning followed by having the LBS check (and refine if needed) your work.

BTW, Jobst Brandt's book "The Bicycle Wheel" is also an excellent reference if a bit more technically involved than most builders really want.
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Old 10-16-06, 06:17 AM
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Well... so, even after getting all hyped up to do this build, I've found another wheel builder that can do it. *PHEW* I'm still going to progress with learning though. Looks like all the parts are cheap enough to give it some practicing at least. I'll start by truing out the wheels on the kids bikes and moving up.

I hate to wuss out on this, but it is my powertap wheel. If there's a wheel i REALLY want to work right the first time out, it would be this one.
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