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Upgrade advice: LBS mechanic or me?

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Upgrade advice: LBS mechanic or me?

Old 12-12-06, 06:29 PM
  #1  
wmelton
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Upgrade advice: LBS mechanic or me?

I知 interested in upgrading some components on my 2005 Felt F70 (105 9-speed) and would like to what upgrades are safe to do myself and what are better left in the hands of a trained mechanic. I have no experience with previous upgrades or maintenance but am reasonably mechanically inclined and would like to gain the hands-on knowledge. Of course, I知 also interested in having a safe, rideable bike when I知 done. I want to accomplish the following:

1: Replace triple crank with new double/BB, adjust front shifter to work w/ double and install a new front derailleur

2: Upgrade cassette

3: Upgrade rear derailleur

Opinions and warnings welcome, thanks in advance.
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Old 12-12-06, 06:34 PM
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I_bRAD
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Those are all easy to do. IMO you're wasting your money "upgrading" a cassette and derailleur though. Especially if they're not worn out yet.
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Old 12-12-06, 06:45 PM
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'nother
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The only one of those that makes any sense at all is changing the cassette, and then, only if you're changing it to some other size/range or if it is truly worn out or damaged. If you're just swapping, say, a perfectly good 105 12-25 for an Ultegra 12-25, that is a pretty useless "upgrade", and a waste of money in my opinion.

I would save the money for new wheels or a new bike or some other more noticeable and useful upgrade.
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Old 12-12-06, 06:55 PM
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Originally Posted by wmelton
I’m interested in upgrading some components on my 2005 Felt F70 (105 9-speed) and would like to what upgrades are safe to do myself and what are better left in the hands of a trained mechanic. I have no experience with previous upgrades or maintenance but am reasonably mechanically inclined and would like to gain the hands-on knowledge. Of course, I’m also interested in having a safe, rideable bike when I’m done. I want to accomplish the following:

1: Replace triple crank with new double/BB, adjust front shifter to work w/ double and install a new front derailleur

2: Upgrade cassette

3: Upgrade rear derailleur

Opinions and warnings welcome, thanks in advance.
#1,2,3 are a complete waste of money
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Old 12-12-06, 07:03 PM
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Thanks for the opinions on the money/value issue, it's good to know the return I'll be getting on my investment. Regarding the original question, is it reasonable for a newbie to do the work required?

Last edited by wmelton; 12-12-06 at 07:10 PM.
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Old 12-12-06, 07:18 PM
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I would do it yourself assuming you have the tools or want to buy them.
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Old 12-12-06, 07:20 PM
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It is all pretty easy stuff. The Park tools web site tells you everything you need to do in a step by step fashion.

I agree with the others though. If these parts aren't worn out, then buy a new wheel set instead.
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Old 12-12-06, 07:27 PM
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Originally Posted by wmelton
Regarding the original question, is it reasonable for a newbie to do the work required?
My neighbor can install all types of garage doors faster than anyone I've ever met, yet I had to show him how to remove the radiator cap on his truck to check the fluid level. Just because one has mechanical ability in one area doesn't mean that that ability will carry over to other areas. Of course you (and surely us) won't know until you try.

Why not pick up a beater cheap at a garage sale/thrift store and try fixing it up instead. At least if you fail your main bike will still be ok. And if you're successful you will have something to show off and be proud of.
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Old 12-12-06, 07:39 PM
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Originally Posted by wmelton
Thanks for the opinions on the money/value issue, it's good to know the return I'll be getting on my investment. Regarding the original question, is it reasonable for a newbie to do the work required?
It's very reasonable. In fact everyone was a newbie before they did it the first time, myslef included. Parktool has the best instructions in my opinion. I of course concur with the other guys that you would be wasting your money. It's natural to assume that since there is something more expensive available, than it will naturally be better. Not really true here.

Going to a double will drop a little weight so that might be worthwhile but for the cost i wouldn't do it. If you want to spend money buy yourself some accessories that WILL make a big difference, like nice shorts, frame pump, helmet etc.
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Old 12-12-06, 07:45 PM
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Aw, go for it. And make sure you have friends that can bail you out if you mess up.

I've upgraded two forks (MTB) and as long as I was able to borrow some critical tools, it was pretty easy.

And don't listen to the naysayers. If a component has bad karma, it should go even if it works well. Never diss the karmic flow of your bicycle.
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Old 12-12-06, 07:52 PM
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Passing on the issue of whether you should make these changes...

As a newbie "mechanic" myself, all of these things are very doable. As with many things, the first time you do them, give yourself plenty of time, go slowly. Pulling cranks, removing a cassette, and aligning a front derailleur for the first time is a bit weird, but the learning curve is steep.

It is very satisfying to do these things yourself.
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Old 12-12-06, 09:05 PM
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I'd do it yourself, it'll be a learning experience. It'd be really hard to mess up your bike by replacing a crank, derailleur and a cassette. The hardest/most tedious part of the job will be adjusting the derailleur. You'll need the proper cassette tool, a chain whip and the right crank extractor to do the job properly. Now, if you were talking about a headset, I'd be a little more cautious as you can easily ovalize the headtube (if it's the "old fashioned" press in cup kind). I agree with the post about buying a $20 garage sale bike and learning the wrenching ropes with it.
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