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Question about broken spoke

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Question about broken spoke

Old 12-13-06, 12:37 PM
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I_bRAD
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Question about broken spoke

I had a spoke go on me today... What information will I need to take to make sure I get the correct replacement when I go to the LBS.

Thanks for the help

Also- I've recently added a milk crate to my rear rack and I've been loading it quite a bit lately so I expect this will happen again. Any recommendations for a strong wheel to replace the current one? It's 26" and I'd like it to be good to ~300-350lbs.
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Old 12-13-06, 12:47 PM
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if you can, bring them the old spoke (both pieces)

edit: if you can't, and want to figure it out for yourself, you can calculate the length using spocalc. you will either need to measure the rim and hub yourself, or obtain the dimensions (effective rim diameter, center to flange distance, flange diameter, and spoke hole diameter) from the manufacturer.

for burly wheels check out tandem rims, high spoke count, 3x. but none of that's any good without a good wheel build. i'd ask around for who's the best.

Last edited by dirtyphotons; 12-13-06 at 12:57 PM.
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Old 12-13-06, 12:52 PM
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Originally Posted by dirtyphotons
if you can, bring them the old spoke (both pieces)
D'oh. I guess that was an obvious answer! Thanks!
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Old 12-13-06, 01:47 PM
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I agree with the tandem wheel idea. If you want bullet-proof, you can get 40-48 spoke wheels that will put up with a ton of abuse. Build quality is also important, so use good, double butted spokes and have the wheels built by a good builder.
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Old 12-13-06, 02:02 PM
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I assume you know that if one spoke goes (specifically a non-drive-side spoke), there's a good chance that all of the spokes on that side are weakening from fatigue. If you break two non-drive-side spokes in success, you can be pretty sure that they all need to be replaced.

Typically, non-drive-side spokes on the rear wheel break because they are lower-tension because of the dish of the wheel. The dishing of the wheel can be minimized by using an off-center rear rim. Ritchey and Velocity both make these, as do other manufactueres. Here's what an OCR rim looks like. Also, a picture of the Velocity Synergy front and OCR rear rim.
Off-center rim designs somewhat minimize the difference in spoke tension due to wheel dishing, allowing non-drive-side spokes to run at higher tension.
An alternate idea to using tandem rim and hub, which are harder to find and often more expensive.
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Old 12-13-06, 02:07 PM
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hi timcupery, while i've got you on the line i wanted to threadjack just for a second.

ever seen an ocr rim on a track wheelset? my fuji track pro came stock with miche track hubs and a ritchey ocr rear rim. seems like ocr isn't really helpful because the wheels are dished symmetrically. is it an oversight on their part or is ocr helpful even when there's no dish?

Last edited by dirtyphotons; 12-13-06 at 02:14 PM.
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Old 12-13-06, 02:54 PM
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I just took a broken spoke in this morning. The lbs had a little tool that is convenient for measuring spokes (basically a ruler with a hole that the curved end of the spoke fits in).

Mine was a non-drive side rear: it sheared off at the hub, such that I was left with a whole spoke with the curved part, but the fat but part was sheared off. Is that from the spoke not being destressed? Might that bode well for the other spokes?
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Old 12-13-06, 02:59 PM
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Wheels with low spoke tension, and uneven tension have more problems.
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Old 12-13-06, 03:02 PM
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I have to agree with Tim, once one spoke goes, the rest soon follow. I was riding stock 32 spoke rear wheel with ~250lbs of weight on it. It lasted about 2K miles, but after my first spoke went, I had new broken spokes every other day (literally).
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Old 12-13-06, 03:43 PM
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I just took the broken spoke in and got the same. I got two, so if another one goes I'm ready! I suspect they might all start to fail... but we'll see how it goes.

Thanks for the tips.
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Old 12-13-06, 03:57 PM
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Originally Posted by dirtyphotons
hi timcupery, while i've got you on the line i wanted to threadjack just for a second.

ever seen an ocr rim on a track wheelset? my fuji track pro came stock with miche track hubs and a ritchey ocr rear rim. seems like ocr isn't really helpful because the wheels are dished symmetrically. is it an oversight on their part or is ocr helpful even when there's no dish?
For a symetrical wheel as on a track bike I think an OCR rim would be as disadvantage as it would require buildiing the wheel with a small amount of spoke assymetry to center it. The problem is very minor and will have no practical consequences, just a theoretical consideration. I expect Fuji built it with the OCR rim because that's what they had in stock.
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Old 12-13-06, 04:11 PM
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Originally Posted by yes
I just took a broken spoke in this morning. The lbs had a little tool that is convenient for measuring spokes (basically a ruler with a hole that the curved end of the spoke fits in).

Mine was a non-drive side rear: it sheared off at the hub, such that I was left with a whole spoke with the curved part, but the fat but part was sheared off.
That's the most common type of spoke failure and it's caused by excessive spoke flexure. The non-driveside rear spokes have lower tension due to the asymetrical wheel dish necessary to make room for the cassette and at the same time keep the rim centered on the bike's frame. The trick is to put as much tension as possible on the driveside rear spokes without overstressing the rim.

Al
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Old 12-14-06, 09:00 AM
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Originally Posted by I_bRAD
I just took the broken spoke in and got the same. I got two, so if another one goes I'm ready! I suspect they might all start to fail... but we'll see how it goes.

Thanks for the tips.

You'd be better off getting 10 new ones to last you a week or 2 . I replaced 4 over 2 weeks after the first one broke. I bought a new set of wheels, and I'm going to rebuild the originals.
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Old 12-14-06, 09:29 AM
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Originally Posted by yes
I just took a broken spoke in this morning. The lbs had a little tool that is convenient for measuring spokes (basically a ruler with a hole that the curved end of the spoke fits in).
Mine was a non-drive side rear: it sheared off at the hub, such that I was left with a whole spoke with the curved part, but the fat but part was sheared off. Is that from the spoke not being destressed? Might that bode well for the other spokes?
This actually isn't the most common, if you're describin the spoke head itself being sheared off and the elbow itself intact.
Spokes normally break at the hub, but at the elbow, because that's what gets flexed when spoke tension ain't high enough. Yours is a really weird breakage, and may bode well for the other spokes. Not sure, although this may be the fault of your description.
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