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Greasing Skewers.

Old 04-21-07, 12:14 AM
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jwbnyc
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Greasing Skewers.

Is this a good idea or a bad idea?

Thanks.
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Old 04-21-07, 12:49 AM
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I would say a bad idea, the last thing you need is for a quick release lever to suddenly pop open on you. But having said that, a light coating on the springs may do no harm...
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Old 04-21-07, 01:06 AM
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I do..did.. it. I've also had the darn things pop off on me before. I would say yes on road bike and no on mountain bikes because it sucks to have your rear wheel come off when you are crossing a log.
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Old 04-21-07, 01:09 AM
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If it is steel, it can help inhibit rust. I grease anything involving threads on a bike.
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Old 04-21-07, 01:21 AM
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Originally Posted by filtersweep
If it is steel, it can help inhibit rust. I grease anything involving threads on a bike.
Agreed, but surely you would not have grease anywhere near the lever cam, nor on the thread of the adjuster bolt on the other end?

You grease all threaded components?
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Old 04-21-07, 03:04 AM
  #6  
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Originally Posted by Cadfael
Agreed, but surely you would not have grease anywhere near the lever cam, nor on the thread of the adjuster bolt on the other end?

You grease all threaded components?
Yes, on all† threaded components (including the adjusting nut on the non-cam end of the skewer). If the skewer is set up correctly, grease on the threads or any bearing surface will enhance operation and help prevent seizing and corrosion.

- Wil

† unless either or both are made of plastic, or the item is used in an atmosphere of oxygen, or used in theatrical lighting instruments

Last edited by Wil Davis; 04-21-07 at 03:15 AM.
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Old 04-21-07, 03:11 AM
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It's a very good idea. I've had a skewer stuck in a hub which had to be drilled out.

Last edited by Cyclist0383; 04-21-07 at 05:10 AM.
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Old 04-21-07, 04:38 AM
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Originally Posted by Cadfael
I would say a bad idea, the last thing you need is for a quick release lever to suddenly pop open on you. But having said that, a light coating on the springs may do no harm...
How would the use of grease on a skewer cause a properly-set release lever to "suddenly pop open"?

Bob

P.S. The instructions that came with my Shimano skewers specifically said to grease them.
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Old 04-21-07, 06:30 AM
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Originally Posted by jwbnyc
Is this a good idea or a bad idea?

Thanks.
Absolutely a good idea. QR skewers - the axles and the springs - are typically one of the first things that will rust on a bike, unless you take a minute and grease them. Some grease on the threads will make the adjustment nut much easier to turn, as well. Just try to not get grease on the surfaces that will grip the dropouts.

It's also not a bad idea to put a drop of oil in the lever pivot.
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Old 04-21-07, 06:53 AM
  #10  
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Originally Posted by Bobby Lex
How would the use of grease on a skewer cause a properly-set release lever to "suddenly pop open"?

Bob

P.S. The instructions that came with my Shimano skewers specifically said to grease them.
agreed. greasing the threads, and particularly the cam, will allow for you to clamp the skewer even tighter. greasing the springs wouldn't do much of anything.
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Old 04-21-07, 08:25 AM
  #11  
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Originally Posted by dafydd
agreed. greasing the threads, and particularly the cam, will allow for you to clamp the skewer even tighter. greasing the springs wouldn't do much of anything.
++

It seems to be a common misconception that greasing threads will encourage them to come loose. Rather, it's the tension of the bolt in the threads that holds a threaded fastener in place. Grease or oil allows the bolt to be tightened more easily, which means better hold (as long as you don't strip anything).

Similarly, a lubricated quick release cam should allow you to clamp it down tighter, and should therefore be safer than an unlubricated one (within reason, of course).
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Old 04-21-07, 08:45 AM
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Originally Posted by Cadfael
I would say a bad idea, the last thing you need is for a quick release lever to suddenly pop open on you. But having said that, a light coating on the springs may do no harm...
I'm generally a big believer in greasing stuff, but I don't usually grease QR skewers. I know good mechanics who do, and there's certaingly no harm in it, but I've never felt it necessary.

I do lubricate the cam with oil. On good (i.e., enclosed-cam) skewers, it isn't practical to grease the cam.

If your QR "popped open" that indicates either that it is one of the bad (i.e., exposed-cam) models or that you didn't secure it properly.

See: https://sheldonbrown.com/qr

Sheldon "Enclosed Cam" Brown
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Old 04-21-07, 09:20 AM
  #13  
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I've always found the need to at least grease the barrel adjusters on cheapy bikes as they are the first to adjust and the most annoying thing to deal with once it rusts.
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Old 04-21-07, 11:36 AM
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On QRs, I use a Teflon based oil. On locking skewers, I do take the time to use a good quality grease so they don't forever become one.
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Old 04-21-07, 02:13 PM
  #15  
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Originally Posted by Sheldon Brown
I'm generally a big believer in greasing stuff, but I don't usually grease QR skewers.
Well, perhaps you take your bike apart and dry everything after riding in the rain, but I don't. After finding a skewer rusty and hard to remove, I just grease them as preventive maintenance.
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Old 04-21-07, 03:43 PM
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Originally Posted by filtersweep
If it is steel, it can help inhibit rust. I grease anything involving threads on a bike.
Me too!
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Old 04-21-07, 07:14 PM
  #17  
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A light coating of anti seize on the threaded end of the skewer is all I have ever read that is needed.
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Old 04-21-07, 07:43 PM
  #18  
jwbnyc
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yikes.

Originally Posted by Ziemas
It's a very good idea. I've had a skewer stuck in a hub which had to be drilled out.
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Old 04-21-07, 09:48 PM
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Originally Posted by Sheldon Brown
I'm generally a big believer in greasing stuff, but I don't usually grease QR skewers. I know good mechanics who do, and there's certaingly no harm in it, but I've never felt it necessary.

I do lubricate the cam with oil. On good (i.e., enclosed-cam) skewers, it isn't practical to grease the cam.

If your QR "popped open" that indicates either that it is one of the bad (i.e., exposed-cam) models or that you didn't secure it properly.

See: https://sheldonbrown.com/qr

Sheldon "Enclosed Cam" Brown
Thanks for the info.

To be honest I have never had one pop open on me, but I have never oiled or greased one either. But I was just surmising it would be an issue... and I bow to people with better knowledge than myself here. It is always good to learn things, it is why I am here afterall. having said that, what is an enclosed cam as opposed to an exposed cam?

EDIT: Ignore the question... I see you posted a link to explain. Thanks again.

Last edited by Cadfael; 04-21-07 at 10:25 PM.
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