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suspension seat posts

Old 06-08-07, 08:58 PM
  #1  
exas
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suspension seat posts

do suspension seat posts take away pedaling power like rear suspension does? are there any disadvantages to suspension seat posts?
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Old 06-08-07, 09:36 PM
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I helped my bro-in-law buy a bike for my younger sister,a Specialized. To answer your question..NO , not hardly enough to notice. I ride the bike some (I sneak a ride on anything) I like that bike. NO perceivable difference in efficiency.. AT ALL. NOW.. IF you're talkin' REAR suspension,the fancy stuff on mountain bikes.. YES, quite a bit, they've improved that too in recent years,through experiment in differnt designs. Honest, I believe SUSP. posts are heavier, notions concerning weight are too dramatic. Besides,folkes these days are returning more and more to bigger , comfort saddles, higher bars. Whatever makes it pleasant. THe seat post on her bike reduces jarring, it doesn't jossle me.Comfort is efficient,a sore back, neck or butt is NOT. Unless you were a student in a Catholic school in the 50s and 60s.
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Old 06-09-07, 12:09 AM
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Originally Posted by old and new
I helped my bro-in-law buy a bike for my younger sister,a Specialized. To answer your question..NO , not hardly enough to notice. I ride the bike some (I sneak a ride on anything) I like that bike. NO perceivable difference in efficiency.. AT ALL. NOW.. IF you're talkin' REAR suspension,the fancy stuff on mountain bikes.. YES, quite a bit, they've improved that too in recent years,through experiment in differnt designs. Honest, I believe SUSP. posts are heavier, notions concerning weight are too dramatic. Besides,folkes these days are returning more and more to bigger , comfort saddles, higher bars. Whatever makes it pleasant. THe seat post on her bike reduces jarring, it doesn't jossle me.Comfort is efficient,a sore back, neck or butt is NOT. Unless you were a student in a Catholic school in the 50s and 60s.
INTERESTING writing STYLE!
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Old 06-09-07, 07:29 AM
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Originally Posted by CdCf
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Interesting capitalization style.

I'd say go for it. If it's not a high-performance road bike you shouldn't be too concerned about efficiency. Some low-end road bikes/touring bikes/flat bar roadies come with minimal seatpost suspension anyway, so do what you think is best.
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Old 06-09-07, 07:37 AM
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My girlfriend has a suspension seatpost and a comfortable seat on her comfort bike. I have ridden it. It is comfortable. If it weren't, she wouldn't ride it. While the suspension seatpost is not technically performance enhancing, if it lends to the rider's overall comfort, performance improvement should follow. About the only pitfall with them is they are heavier than non-supended seatposts.
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Old 06-09-07, 02:52 PM
  #6  
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Originally Posted by exas
do suspension seat posts take away pedaling power like rear suspension does? are there any disadvantages to suspension seat posts?
If the seatpost moves up and down, that means there is work being done. Where do you suppose the power comes from to do that work?

Old school bike riders, like me, will experiment for ages and work very hard to find the exact "sweet spot" for saddle height. So what happens when the suspension seatpost lowers the saddle 1/4 inch?
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Old 06-09-07, 03:00 PM
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I'm with Retro Grouch, I don't like'em. It's essentially a short travel pogo stick beneath your butt, no way it doesn't affect your pedaling efficiency. They're usually quite heavy, too, compared to a conventional post.

For bikepath cruisers who want a super plush ride, okay, go for it. And in fairness, I've known mountain bikers who swear by them, especially the Cane Creek Thudbuster (uses a parallelogram design). But I knew a guy who spent a small fortune building a very light hardtail race bike once, and then he put a Thudbuster on it. Seemed ridiculous to me, but to each their own-
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Old 06-09-07, 08:01 PM
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Suspension posts do introduce an added element of maintenance.
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Old 06-10-07, 06:24 AM
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Some energy is absorbed by the suspension system and is taken away from forward motion. They weigh more. If you ride on smooth road surfaces with 26" or more wheels you probably do not need one. If you weigh allot you may bottom it out, so it is not doing anything. On the other hand if you plan on doing 50 mi of broken pavement and packed dirt roads it might help out. If the handle bars are high those saddles with the springs in the back are just as good.
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Old 06-10-07, 08:21 AM
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I think they make sense on rigid aluminum hybrids. Since, you are more upright on most hybrids, most of your weight is square on the saddle and those bikes are like sitting naked on an I beam. 1/4 to 1/2" of travel isn't going to make any perceivable performance difference to these riders or me for that matter. However, it will improve the comfort level dramatically.

I have one of those rigid aluminum hybrids. It's got 28mm tires on it, but they are really more like 32s. I keep them pumped up to the max which is about 82psi. Even with a pretty decent saddle with some cushion, going over any non-solid surface on the bike is quite jarring. This is with a rigid seatpost. I recently decided enough is enough. I'm not buying the suspension seatpost, I'm selling the thing.

I bought a steel Jamis Coda. Oddly enough, it came with a suspension seatpost. I always wanted to try one out, even though I don't think it's necessary with a steel frame...the frame is the suspension. Anyhow, I'm not sure of the travel on the post, but I rode it 7 miles yesterday and I could never feel any pogoing or even the seatpost moving at all. In fact, I forgot it was there. I would have no problem at all keeping it on there. I'll leave it on there for a while just to check it out, but will likely remove it down the road for the weight savings. Plus, I don't think they're necessary on steel framed bikes. The hybrid is my commuter.
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Old 06-17-07, 10:33 AM
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I like that the discussion really looks at the question from all of the important angles -- does loss occur and is it noticeable and what are the additional maintenance issues?

Yes losses occur, but I believe it will also be unnoticed if the bike is not a high performance level bike. The maintenance issues are the real pain -- you have to make sure you're in the right range for the suspension (not too hard else may not be using the suspension, not too soft else bottom out). Also, you have to clean up and lube the moving parts of the suspension every once in awhile, re-tune the suspension when it eventually gets loose, etc..
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Old 06-17-07, 10:45 AM
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I had one for a time on a bike. I did not care for it, but to be fair it was one of the telescoping models (as opposed to something like the CC Thud Buster). I found that it did cause some loss in efficiency, but what I liked least was that it changed the position of my seat relative to the pedals.
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Old 06-17-07, 11:20 AM
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I have one on my hybrid, came on the bike. At first it was a bit disconcerting, now I'm used to it and kind of like it.
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Old 06-17-07, 01:06 PM
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I have a suspension seatpost on my Bianchi Volpe. My major complaint is that the thing squeaks like an old spring bed. Very annoying. Of course, Bianchi is nowadays using a rigid seatpost and I think that would have worked better.
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Old 06-17-07, 02:50 PM
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Remove seatpost from bike, turn upside down, tighten adjustment on bottom of post to remove most all "bounce" (you shouldn't be able to move seat (installed on bike) with your hands) and have fun.

My wife's Specialized Crossroads has one and other than the weight (non)issue it works fine for her.
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