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Where can I find vise jaws to clamp a small, cylindrical shaft (working on a shock)?

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Where can I find vise jaws to clamp a small, cylindrical shaft (working on a shock)?

Old 06-10-07, 04:12 AM
  #1  
dslfoolish
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Where can I find vise jaws to clamp a small, cylindrical shaft (working on a shock)?

I need some vise jaws to clamp a skinny, cylindrical shaft very TIGHTLY without damaging it. It's for my Manitou swinger 3-way's damper shaft. I need to unthread a part off one end of the shaft, but it's threaded on very tightly. I tried some soft rubbery vise jaws in my vise, but it simply flexes and can't even begin to grip the shaft tightly.

The service manual says I need something like this but I can't seem to find it ANYWHERE online. I was thinking something like this might work, but I'm afraid it might marr the surface of the shaft badly. Plus, it has to be able to grip very tightly, and not slip, and I'm not sure the prismatic surface will be able to hold tightly enough.



Does anyone have any ideas?
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Old 06-10-07, 08:27 AM
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Proximo
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Use a couple of small blocks of hardwood. With a small half round rasp, form a half round indent in each piece slightly smaller than the part you want to clamp. Cut a couple of strips of leather or rubber and glue them (rough side out if using leather) inside the indents. Put the wood blocks around the part then clamp the whole thing firmly in the vice. You can probably get away without using glue but you want something stickier than wood between the part and the wood to grip it. The wood is there so you can tighten the hell out of the vice to prevent slippage and not worry about marring anything. A hardwood like oak is best because it will resist the crushing force of the vice better than common pine. In the US, you can get small pieces of 1"x1" oak at any Home Depot. Rough side out leather grips incredibly well. You can find small pieces at a craft store or do what I do and cut them from an old shoe/boot.

Last edited by Proximo; 06-10-07 at 08:38 AM.
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Old 06-10-07, 08:52 AM
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Grand Bois
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depending on the diameter of the cylinder, an axel vise might work for you.
http://www.parktool.com/products/det...8&item=AV%2D1#
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Old 06-10-07, 11:08 AM
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I have the same shock. It is indeed threaded on very tightly. Here's what I did since I don't have a vise: I used an adjustable wrench on the eyelet end. (It didn't mar up the finish). Place the wrench on the ground and step on it with your foot. Put all your weight on the wrench to keep it from moving. Then grip the shock body tight as you can. I wrapped old inner tube around it for better grip. Turn like heck. It worked for me. Good luck.
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Old 06-10-07, 11:19 AM
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Make your own axle-vise. Measure the diameter of the shock's shaft. Then get two blocks of aluminium and clamp them together in a vise. Get a drill-bit that's the exact same diameter as the shaft and bore a hole through the seam between the two pieces of aluminium. Voila!!! Instant axle-vise. To increase clamping force, grind the inner surfaces of the blocks on some sandpaper or a belt-sander to make the ID of the hole between them smaller.
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Old 06-10-07, 02:57 PM
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thanks a lot!! This thread has been really helpful. I may try to do the drilling hole in block of wood idea, but I'll have see if my buddy has a drill first! Anyway, hope this works out!
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Old 06-10-07, 08:37 PM
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Originally Posted by DannoXYZ
Make your own axle-vise. Measure the diameter of the shock's shaft. Then get two blocks of aluminium and clamp them together in a vise. Get a drill-bit that's the exact same diameter as the shaft and bore a hole through the seam between the two pieces of aluminium. Voila!!! Instant axle-vise. To increase clamping force, grind the inner surfaces of the blocks on some sandpaper or a belt-sander to make the ID of the hole between them smaller.
You don't have to grind the surfaces for a tighter fit. Before you clamp the pieces in the vice, put a piece of non-corrugated cardboard (like used for breakfast cereal boxes) between them. I've made such clamping blocks all the way from 3/32" to 2.288" (for holding Sturmey Archer hubs) For clamps under an inch, I use aluminum. For an inch or more I use hardwood.
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Old 06-11-07, 07:07 AM
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Or drill a solid block then cut it in half through the hole.

Btw, the Craftsman jaws linked above would also work well (provided the shaft is hard metal, which is probably is).
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