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spoke / hub compatibility problem

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spoke / hub compatibility problem

Old 06-18-07, 09:22 PM
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niknak
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spoke / hub compatibility problem

I'm building a new front wheel with DT 2/1.8/2 spokes and a dura-ace hub. While lacing up the first 8 spokes on the drive side, I noticed that the end of each spoke isn't sitting flush with the hub flange. It's as if the flange is too thick or the spoke neck is too short. Does that make sense? The result is that the laced spokes make the hub jut way out from the theoretical center. I don't want to bend the spoke elbows without some advice first. I'm pretty sure the hub spoke hole diameter is 2.4mm, so the spokes should slide through and sit flush with the hub without any muscle work. Any ideas? Thanks...

I've built a few sets of wheels now, but I still consider myself new to wheelbuilding. This has never happened before.
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Old 06-18-07, 11:48 PM
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I have built many sets of wheels, and had to bend the spoke elbows slightly and gently on most of them. Some of those wheels are still running strong without being trued in the last 10 years, so I don't see why it would be a problem.
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Old 06-18-07, 11:53 PM
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I ran into the same thing a few days ago. I was building with an XT hub and 2-1.8-2 spokes. I also didn't notice this as much in the previous few pairs of wheels I have built.
My local wheel guru, and at least one wheel building guide I have read - don't remember which one, Sheldon Brown's maybe - say to bend the spoke as flat against the hub as you can get it and give each spoke a rap or two with a rubber mallet to get it's bend as flat to the hub flange as you can. This actually makes a dent in the hub flange for the spoke more than it dents the spoke. This is normal and the main reason why a used hub is best rebuilt to the same spoke pattern.

The spoke should bend flat against the hub under tension in time anyway. This way, you get the settling in out of the way at build time so there's less to readjust later. Also, if the spoke does not sit against the flange, it can flex and fatigue at the bend, increasing the chance of spoke failure there in time.
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Old 06-19-07, 07:17 AM
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Above comments are correct. It's much better to have a thick flange than a thin one, but you need to get the spokes seated as much as possible when building to lessen later adjustments.
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Old 06-19-07, 02:20 PM
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Thanks guys. Rode on my new wheel this morning. Everything worked out fine.
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Old 06-19-07, 03:20 PM
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Originally Posted by cny-bikeman
Above comments are correct. It's much better to have a thick flange than a thin one, but you need to get the spokes seated as much as possible when building to lessen later adjustments.
What these posters are describing is formally known as "stress relieving" the spokes. I.e. you bend them at the elbows so they fall in as straight a line as possible from the hub flange to the rim hole without being held there by tension. That way there are no residual stresses when the wheel is in use and the spoke fatigue life is significantly improved.
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Old 06-19-07, 05:15 PM
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Yeah, I've stress relieved all of my previous wheels. This wheel threw me for a loop because the spokes needed a lot more "coaxing" to sit flush with the hub flange. I was hesitant at first to put so much muscle into bending the spokes. Once some people chimed in that the extra force wouldn't harm the spokes, I finished up the wheel with no problems. Thanks for your help.
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