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-   -   Hints and tricks thread (https://www.bikeforums.net/bicycle-mechanics/316561-hints-tricks-thread.html)

rumrunn6 06-27-17 07:19 AM

question #5 doesn't let us select more than one item
the question "How much would you pay for a safety device for your bike" is not specific enough, do you mean a light? a lock?

SylvainG 06-28-17 09:44 AM

When adjusting the rear derailleur with the help of the adjustment barrel, the derailleur will move in the same direction as the top of the barrel.

zammykoo 07-01-17 10:32 AM

This one is not really a bike maintenance tip but something useful for those with the base model Park Tool repair stand. You can 3d print your own add-ons (if you have a printer or know someone who does).

Leg clip for storage:
https://www.thingiverse.com/thing:1272344

Tool caddy:
https://www.thingiverse.com/thing:1275681

Hex wrench bracket:
https://www.thingiverse.com/thing:1695559

Misc tool holder:
https://www.thingiverse.com/thing:49227


My brother printed a leg clip for me and it works like a charm!

http://i.imgur.com/1uKzy73.jpg

RubeRad 07-03-17 08:17 AM

That's awesome! My local public library has a 3D printer for rent, I don't have a Park stand, but I'll look around at other thingiverse designs to see what might be useful

ksisler 07-04-17 09:15 PM

Read up to make sure you know the difference between foot pounds and inch pounds and that you have the right torque wrench...before tightening those dinky bike bolts that seem to come loose at the wrong time if not tightened perfectly or break off if over tightened...

jbw57 07-31-17 09:05 PM

I like Caig products for electrical connections, batteries, lights, etc....they have a host of products for many electrical projects around the bike or whatever.

http://caig.com/

ZuniCycle 08-15-17 05:47 AM

U lock mounted on the bottom of the downtube
 
1 Attachment(s)
I couldn't find an example of anyone else doing this, so I thought I'd share it. I've been riding with the U lock attached this way for more than 100 miles and haven't had a problem. This way it's not taking up other useful space. There's no screw holes to attach accessories there on my bikes frame anyway.

wgscott 08-22-17 06:43 PM

Quote:

Originally Posted by ZuniCycle (Post 19793063)
I couldn't find an example of anyone else doing this.

There might be a reason for that...:eek:

FBinNY 08-22-17 07:47 PM

Quote:

Originally Posted by wgscott (Post 19811350)
There might be a reason for that...:eek:

I don't know what problem you see. I've carried camp stove fuel in just about the same place for decades and never had a problem.

However, the OP's lock extends pretty low, so I expect that he needs extra care if there are old style speed bumps where he rides, otherwise I'll venture that he never has issues with it.

Ira B 08-27-17 08:56 PM

Quote:

Originally Posted by ksisler (Post 19696680)
Read up to make sure you know the difference between foot pounds and inch pounds and that you have the right torque wrench...before tightening those dinky bike bolts that seem to come loose at the wrong time if not tightened perfectly or break off if over tightened...

Just tighten everything until it snaps, then back off a quarter turn. :D

ZuniCycle 08-29-17 02:40 PM

Quote:

Originally Posted by FBinNY (Post 19811489)
I don't know what problem you see. I've carried camp stove fuel in just about the same place for decades and never had a problem.

However, the OP's lock extends pretty low, so I expect that he needs extra care if there are old style speed bumps where he rides, otherwise I'll venture that he never has issues with it.

It doesn't extend lower than the pedals when they're vertical. It doesn't get nicked even when riding up onto curbs.

Besides using otherwise unused space, I really hated having the lock on the top tube or seat tube because it's free to swing on the mount. It would sometimes hit my legs when pedaling which was annoying.

FBinNY 08-29-17 03:08 PM

Quote:

Originally Posted by ZuniCycle (Post 19826897)
It doesn't extend lower than the pedals when they're vertical. It doesn't get nicked even when riding up onto curbs.

Besides using otherwise unused space, I really hated having the lock on the top tube or seat tube because it's free to swing on the mount. It would sometimes hit my legs when pedaling which was annoying.

I'm with you, and agree that it's good use of otherwise unused space. My only concern was speed bumps, because around here there are a number high enough to clip a pedal, though not the BB shell. I ride fixed some of the time, and have to time it so I clear the bump while neither pedal is low.

However, if that's not an issue for you, I can't see any other.

ksisler 08-31-17 07:19 PM

Ingenuity for finding a personal use for dead space is well regarded here. Kudos.

Many of my touring bikes and tandems have water bottle braze on mounts on the bottom of the down-tube that would place that water bottle in the top half of the area holding the OP's lock-thing. Some others have pegs for old-school air pump down there. I really like having an extra bottle of water and have been often guilty of removing the bottom side pump pegs on bikes that aren't collectible or historically significant.

Ganzen 09-04-17 04:04 PM

Rear wheel single speed install
 
Quote:

Originally Posted by I_bRAD (Post 4779646)
By walking the wheel he means tighten one nut, slide the axle back on the opposite side, and then repeat for the other side. Usually once or twice will do it.

Always tighten the nut on the brake lever side (left side) first. This will prevent the bearing nuts from loosening on the axle and goofing up the preload if the bearing nuts are'nt solidly backed with a locking nut, or even if they are.

Ganzen 09-04-17 04:50 PM

Reshaping bent seat tube collar
 
Had a bike delivered in a box and the seat tube collar was mangled and out of round. It was heavy guage steel and was not responding well to wedging with a small diameter pipe. Then it occurred to me that the bike had a powerful wedge in the handlebar downtube. I pull the handlebars off, slipped the hanblebar downtube into the seat tube just past the mangled spot. I then rotated the handlebar downtube so the wedge nut was located opposite the bent portion of the seat collar and tightened the handlebar wedge a bit. The bent part of the seat collar straightened predictably and after a couple of cycles of repositioning and tightening, the seat collar was rounded up nicely and the seat tube slid into place easily without scratching the finish. Tightened the seat collar quicklock, reinstalled the handlebars and moved on with
assembly.

ksisler 09-11-17 08:05 PM

Quote:

Originally Posted by Ganzen (Post 19840357)
Had a bike delivered in a box and the seat tube collar was mangled and out of round. It was heavy guage steel and was not responding well to wedging with a small diameter pipe. Then it occurred to me that the bike had a powerful wedge in the handlebar downtube. I pull the handlebars off, slipped the hanblebar downtube into the seat tube just past the mangled spot. I then rotated the handlebar downtube so the wedge nut was located opposite the bent portion of the seat collar and tightened the handlebar wedge a bit. The bent part of the seat collar straightened predictably and after a couple of cycles of repositioning and tightening, the seat collar was rounded up nicely and the seat tube slid into place easily without scratching the finish. Tightened the seat collar quicklock, reinstalled the handlebars and moved on with
assembly.

OP; Suggest it would have been more clever to file a claim with the seller for damage. They would then advise that you file a claim with the shipping company, etc., but eventually you end up with a bike in the condition you ordered it in (new, used, etc), not something marginally un-twisted and probably still unsafe to ride.

NJgreyhead 09-12-17 05:11 AM

Ganzen, I admire your creative DIY solution. Kudos.
-NJg

woodcraft 10-09-17 10:53 AM

1 Attachment(s)
When patching an inner tube,

offending seam ridges can be sanded down by pinching the tube

so that the seam sticks up at the fold, also cleaning the rubber next to the seam.

Then use two coats of cement and compress the completed patch to set- I use a ball peen hammer.

capnjonny 10-18-17 11:08 AM

When I find the puncture spot on a tube I take a sharpie and mark an x over the puncture after I clean and sand the area. Then when applying the patch I can center it effectively over the hole. Also, I like to clanp the tube lightly to the work bench on either side of the puncture so the affected spot stays right side up and doesn't move.

RubeRad 10-18-17 12:11 PM

When I find a small puncture I mark it by sticking a sewing pin into it, which I keep in my patch kit. It marks the place, and also enlarges the hole just a little bit, making it easier to re-find if necessary, without making it less patchable.

jack002 10-25-17 09:18 AM

Quote:

Originally Posted by capnjonny (Post 19937205)
When I find the puncture spot on a tube I take a sharpie and mark an x over the puncture after I clean and sand the area. Then when applying the patch I can center it effectively over the hole. Also, I like to clanp the tube lightly to the work bench on either side of the puncture so the affected spot stays right side up and doesn't move.

I use a silver sharpie for that (There's also gold ones) Also a mark on the tire where the stem is is good for indicating where the tire is on the wheel. (handy for finding why you flatted)


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