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tire size

Old 07-23-07, 09:49 AM
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adab
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tire size

So now I'm considering just putting new tires on my Giant-Boulder mtb. I have 26x1.95 size tires. Would 700x28 road tires fit?
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Old 07-23-07, 09:50 AM
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No.
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Old 07-23-07, 09:56 AM
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No. The bead size of the replacement tires must match (26" and 700C are different sizes). If you want slick road tires, you need 26" slicks. For example, these are cheap and decent 26x1.25" slicks.

Also see Sheldon Brown's tire sizing guide: http://sheldonbrown.com/tire-sizing
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Old 07-23-07, 10:23 AM
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Ritchey makes the skinniest MTB slick I know of, called Tom Slick, 26 x 1", 100 psi, $15 at Nashbar.
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Old 07-23-07, 11:08 AM
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Keep in mind that going to a "skinny" street tire will, in addition to being much easier to pedal, will also gear you down.
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Old 07-23-07, 11:15 AM
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Originally Posted by Bill Kapaun View Post
Keep in mind that going to a "skinny" street tire will, in addition to being much easier to pedal, will also gear you down.
This is an interesting point. I used to think the 44/13 top gearing of my MTB with knobby tires was plenty high (a gain ratio of 6.3)... I almost never used the top gear. Now that I ride a touring bike with 175 mm cranks and slick tires, and I have gotten stronger, a gain ratio of 6.3 is a normal gear for me... I now have a top gear of about 8.5 and I definitely use it on the downhills.
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