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Upgrading brakes - Raleigh (frustration) pics

Old 01-01-08, 07:49 PM
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Wardrive
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Upgrading brakes - Raleigh (frustration) pics

I acquired a very nice older Raleigh bike that I wanted to do a few simple upgrades to. The main thing was to upgrade the brakes.



The stock brakes were "Dia Comp" cheap versions. I have a nice set of Shimano RX100 brakes that I wanted to install. I removed the stock brakes (foreground) and have the newer Shimano (background)



I soon found out that the attachment bolts on the Shimano were not long enough. The cap bolt for the Shimano is also to large to fit into the holes in the frame



I am not sure if this is a "Raleigh" issue, or just a common one for older bikes in general. Is there a work around that can make these Shimano brakes usable?

Signed,
Frustrated in KC



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Old 01-01-08, 07:54 PM
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The old brakes are "nutted" (not a "Raleigh issue", just the way brakes were before recessed nuts), the newer ones use recessed nuts. Here's a link to Sheldon's site, with ideas on how to deal with the problem:

http://www.sheldonbrown.com/gloss_ra-e.html#recessed
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Old 01-01-08, 09:00 PM
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All older frames are nutted and then they switched over (in about 88 or so?). There is no workaround that is simpler and cheaper than merely getting the rignt calipers.

Those newer calipers you got would work better, but you might give the old ones a try again. Good pads, and new cables and housings, and the right adjustment can do wonders.

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Old 01-01-08, 09:14 PM
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[QUOTE=jgedwa;5906263]All older frames are nutted and then they switched over (in about 88 or so?)/[QUOTE]

Generally, for entry level bikes, it was a little earlier than '88. More like '84-

Last edited by well biked; 01-01-08 at 09:31 PM.
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Old 01-01-08, 09:26 PM
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re

OK, thanks for the Sheldon link. I did his suggestion and for the most part it worked....except....

I mounted the rear brake as instructed, looks/works great!



I mounted the front brake as instructed, mounted good...except...



The pads do not reach down far enough to grab the wheel, they hit on the tire!



I moved the pads down as far as they would go. I even mounted a newer 105 brake to see if it had a little further reach, same result.

Ugggg.....
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Old 01-01-08, 09:36 PM
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If you want to get a different brake for the front, you need to measure (in millimeters) from the center of the brake mount hole to the center of the rim's brake surface. That's the amount of reach you need, then you can try and find a brake that has the reach you need-
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Old 01-02-08, 01:42 AM
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Joshua A.C. New
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Could that be the wrong size wheel? Could that be a 700c and the bike requires a 27"?
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Old 01-02-08, 08:03 AM
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Originally Posted by Joshua A.C. New View Post
Could that be the wrong size wheel? Could that be a 700c and the bike requires a 27"?
No, that's not it. The problem is that the original brakes were what is now called "long reach" (47-57 mm) and the new brakes are "short reach" (37-47 mm). Long reach brakes were almost universal until the '80's when short reach brakes became the norm on sports and racing bikes.

Long reach brakes are still used on some bikes and are available from Shimano and Tektro. Nashbar's house brand brakes are Tektros and are available in long reach.

To the OP, you can fit the recessed type mounting bolts to your fork by drilling out current 6 mm hole in the the rear face of the fork crown with an 8mm or 5/16" drill bit. Be sure to drill ONLY the rear face of the crown. However, before drilling, be sure you have gotten brakes with the right "reach".
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Old 01-02-08, 08:26 AM
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I would also recommend getting rid of the "cheater" brake levers. They are worthless for braking and tend to twist the brake levers.
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Old 01-02-08, 09:11 AM
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Originally Posted by San Rensho View Post
I would also recommend getting rid of the "cheater" brake levers. They are worthless for braking and tend to twist the brake levers.
I agree. If you want to brake without going down to the drops, get some cyclocross levers. They work great and they're not that hard to install.
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Old 01-02-08, 07:13 PM
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re

Yes, I measured the reach and I need 54-55mm to get the wheel rims. I have ordered a set of long reach brakes (Tektro?) so I will see how they work.

Concerning the brake levers, that is the other area I was changing. I am removing the stock drop bars and brakes. The stock bar is WAYYYyyyyy to narrow. I found a nice 44cm chrome bar to replace it with. I also have some nice Shimano brake levers with white hoods to put on it.

The white hoods are pretty dingy, anyone know an effective way to clean them up?

I will post additional pic's.
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Old 01-02-08, 07:40 PM
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Originally Posted by Wardrive View Post
Yes, I measured the reach and I need 54-55mm to get the wheel rims. I have ordered a set of long reach brakes (Tektro?) so I will see how they work.

Concerning the brake levers, that is the other area I was changing. I am removing the stock drop bars and brakes. The stock bar is WAYYYyyyyy to narrow. I found a nice 44cm chrome bar to replace it with. I also have some nice Shimano brake levers with white hoods to put on it.

The white hoods are pretty dingy, anyone know an effective way to clean them up?

I will post additional pic's.
Switching to modern "aero" levers will make MUCH more improvement than changing the calipers.

Making white brake hoods was one of the stupidest ideas Shimano ever came up with. I have had surprising success in cleaning them up though, when I used to work on customers' bikes.

I kept a pump spray bottle of undiluted citrus degreaser. I would spray this on the white hoods and let it sit for a minute or two, then rub hard with a clean rag (terrycloth towel is best.) Repeat a couple of times if necessary. This works amazingly well.

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Old 01-02-08, 08:42 PM
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Originally Posted by Wardrive View Post
The stock bar is WAYYYyyyyy to narrow. I found a nice 44cm chrome bar to replace it with.
I don't know why but older Raleighs must have come with very narrow bars. A friend has a '72 Super Course (sp?) with a 25.5" frame (~65 cm) and it came with 39 cm bars! They were one of the first things we changed.

BTW, are the Shimano brake levers refer to "aero" type or the old exposed cable type like you show on the bike now? Sheldon is right that changing to the newer aero design will have a very beneficial effect on braking.
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Old 01-03-08, 07:57 PM
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Originally Posted by HillRider View Post
I don't know why but older Raleighs must have come with very narrow bars. A friend has a '72 Super Course (sp?) with a 25.5" frame (~65 cm) and it came with 39 cm bars! They were one of the first things we changed.
That's not a specifically Raleigh thing.

Back in the day ('70s and earlier) 38-39 cm was the normal width for drop bars.

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Old 01-24-08, 08:29 AM
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Originally Posted by Sheldon Brown View Post
Switching to modern "aero" levers will make MUCH more improvement than changing the calipers.
Why will the "aero" levers improve braking? I looking around and couldn't find any reasons why. I have a similar bike as the one that is discussed in this thread, and the stock weimann brake levers appear to have the same mechanical advantage as the "aero" levers. Where does the benefit come from?

Thanks
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Old 01-24-08, 08:34 AM
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Originally Posted by Wheelie Pete View Post
Why will the "aero" levers improve braking? I looking around and couldn't find any reasons why. I have a similar bike as the one that is discussed in this thread, and the stock weimann brake levers appear to have the same mechanical advantage as the "aero" levers. Where does the benefit come from?

Thanks
The pivots are located in a different position. I notice the improvement in leverage most when braking with my hands on the hoods. Here's Sheldon's discussion of it in his glossary:
http://www.sheldonbrown.com/gloss_aa-l.html#aerobrake
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