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seat post turn around

Old 01-28-08, 09:09 PM
  #1  
opn2itsd
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seat post turn around

CF madone 5.3 with CF seat post. I'm long in the leg, short in the torso, so the bars are a bit past comfortable on longer (30 + miles). I'm thinking of turning my post around (straight bontrager) to gain the extra reach and avoid new forks, stem risers, a higher angle on the stem, etc. Is this a bad idea? Can the post take the change in force. The leg and stand over are great, i'm just not ready to take a racing stance that far until I can regularly log the longer distances.
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Old 01-28-08, 10:33 PM
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Ankleweightman
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Different saddle position.

Try anything that may improve your, speed. ride, comfort or endurance. You do not have to look like a typical "racer". Be independent. The founder of Wal-mart once said something like--Be different, choose a "new" way --people may ridicule you, but you can be a success. Signed, One Oddrider.
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Old 01-28-08, 11:02 PM
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I ride fast enough where very few can really see what i'm riding with, not a brag, i just like to push. I worry more about the change in force applied to the post itself. Really don't want to lose my saddel 20 miles out
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Old 01-28-08, 11:05 PM
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With some posts it is not possible to get the angle right when reversed. For those where it works, there is no problem for the post. One theory of bike fitting is that you should be able to balance with the cranks horizontal and zero pressure on the saddle or bars. Reversing the seatpost can muck this up for some riders. I tend to do it anyway. I'm 6'5" and tend to run the post very high. This moves me backward and shifts a lot more weight onto the rear wheel. Reversing the post helps this. I'm also short in the torso, so your goal is a point in favor of this also.
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Old 01-29-08, 07:36 PM
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cool, I'm 6'4" with long legs, i'll try it then. If it can take the turn, it should also take the force. Thanks
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Old 01-29-08, 07:51 PM
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Profile makes a seatpost with a noticable "kink" they called the "Fast Forward". It is intended for Tri and TT riders to get them forward on their aerobars while using a frame with a conventional seat tube angle. Here is the link to Profile's site: https://www.profile-design.com/produc.../fast-forward/

Unfortunately these things only come in 27.0 and 27.2. If you need a different size it won't work (or will need a shim) but the concept is what you want.
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Old 01-29-08, 10:20 PM
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Trying to get a less-agressive position by moving the saddle far forward seems like it should work but it usually is a change for the worse.

Your upper body is supported by your legs and by your arms. Your legs come into play more and more as the saddle moves to the rear. Moving the saddle forward will increase the amount of weight carried by the rider's hands.

See also: https://sheldonbrown.com/pain

Sheldon "Slack Angles" Brown
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Old 01-30-08, 04:24 PM
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When I got my Trek last year, I found I had the same problem--saddle just wouldn't go forward far enough to be comfortable, so I turned the seatpost around and got it even further forward. It worked but looked a little goofy. Then I switched to my old saddle and all was well. Now I've got a new bike and I'm trying the "regular" way again with a different saddle, which seems to be working okay.

So maybe you need to try out different saddles?
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Old 01-30-08, 06:56 PM
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Second saddle. Went 20 something and things seemed okay. Felt like the weight was arms and legs rather than legs and back, which I think is what I want. The wind was silly here in SD so I definately spent the time in the saddle. We'll see what the morning brings.
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Old 01-30-08, 07:54 PM
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Originally Posted by kle View Post
So maybe you need to try out different saddles?
Good suggesion.

Different saddle manufacturers use different length rails on their saddles. Selle Italia is among the longest. This will allow you the most adjustment forward without altering the seatpost. Also what setback does your post have? Is it 0mm?

Once you move the saddle forward pay attention to your knees over the next 6 months to a year. If knee pain develops you may need to rethink your approach. Some people can't tolerate such a forward position while for others it's perfectly fine.

Last edited by Bob Dopolina; 01-31-08 at 05:48 PM.
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Old 01-31-08, 08:41 AM
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The "classic" way to do your fit, I didn't say the only way nor necessarily the "best" way, is to adjust the saddle so your front kneecap is right in a vertical line with your front horizontal pedal axle. Then, you can have a longer or shorter stem so you are comfortable on long rides. Stems lengths go from about 60 mm to 140 mm. Maybe you can "borrow" a shorter stem from your LBS to try it...
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