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How far does a turn of a nipple move a rim?

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How far does a turn of a nipple move a rim?

Old 02-02-08, 09:19 PM
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theopowers
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How far does a turn of a nipple move a rim?

I have some instructions for using a standard wheel dish gauge that touches the hub and the rim at two places. It has a formula that takes the distance the non-touching point is from the rim or hub and determines approximately how many turns of the nipples will properly dish the wheel.

This suggests to me that one turn of a nipple will move a rim a standard amount to the left or right. Is this true, and does anybody know how far? Thanks!

PS does this amount vary based on rim size? e.g. 700c vs 650c?
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Old 02-02-08, 09:24 PM
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Originally Posted by theopowers View Post
I have some instructions for using a standard wheel dish gauge that touches the hub and the rim at two places. It has a formula that takes the distance the non-touching point is from the rim or hub and determines approximately how many turns of the nipples will properly dish the wheel.

This suggests to me that one turn of a nipple will move a rim a standard amount to the left or right. Is this true, and does anybody know how far? Thanks!

PS does this amount vary based on rim size? e.g. 700c vs 650c?
Spokes are generally 56 tpi, so one turn of the nipple will shorten the spoke by 1/56"

How much that will move the rim sideways depends on the angle of the spoke from the central plane of the wheel.

To properly dish a rear wheel you need to start out with shorter spokes on the right than on the left, usually a 1 or 2 mm difference. Then you fine tune the dishing as you fine tune the truing.

See: https://sheldonbrown.com/wheelbuilding

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Old 02-03-08, 12:05 AM
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In my humble experience, there is no such thing as "standard" when it comes to messing with spokes, rims, and nipples.

It is 50% touch and 50% thinking.

No one is really perfect at it, but working slowly and carefully will make you pretty good at it.

Good luck.

jim
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Old 02-03-08, 08:13 AM
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As the torque increases, it is far more likely the spoke will rotate
with the nipple than the spoke remain stationary and the nipple
rotate on the threads. The thread to thread friction is extremely
high. This is more easily recognized with flattened spokes, and
easier to counter but periodic 'unloading' of rim tension by removal
from the frame and bouncing your weight on the rim edge will
allow the spokes to untorque with a ping and allow truing to proceed.
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Old 02-04-08, 10:11 AM
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Originally Posted by jgedwa View Post
In my humble experience, there is no such thing as "standard" when it comes to messing with spokes, rims, and nipples.

It is 50% touch and 50% thinking.

No one is really perfect at it, but working slowly and carefully will make you pretty good at it.

Good luck.

jim
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