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Old 02-20-08, 01:03 AM   #1
mike-on-da-bike
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which bike lock is best?

i been readin some post on da net and they advise to use a good D-lock as they also say most bikes are stolen simply by cutting those cable types or chain types,i also read where they say dont buy the older style barrell d-lock,what do you guys use and can you recommend a thief proof one?
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Old 02-20-08, 02:28 AM   #2
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New York FahgettabouditŪ U-lock
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Old 02-20-08, 02:30 AM   #3
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There are a ton of locks out there - while the one above is among the most secure, there are also considerations of how much security you need and how much weight/bulk you are willing to tote around. IOW, there is no universal "best" - it depends on your priorities.

- Mark
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Old 02-20-08, 02:46 AM   #4
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I see LOTS of people getting VERY secure locks, and then lock up the bike in a hidden or semi hidden location?
I guess they are trying to hide the bike so no one finds it, and really all they do is give the thief a nice safe place to sit there and work on that lock for a half hour undisturbed.

get a good MINI U-lock (like the one above) they are too small to get a tiny car jack into, and lock the bike in the most ridiculously public locations you can find: in front of the bar, next to the box office, on the handrail at the courthouse, etc,...follow the lock manufacturers recommendations for HOW to put the lock ON THE BIKE, and SEND IN THE REGISTRATION INFO,...most of the better locks carry a "if you lock it like we tell you and the bike gets stolen, we will cover the cost of your replacement bike" type of guarantee.
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Old 02-20-08, 03:46 AM   #5
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I actually use a long shackle U-lock and I am very happy with it. There are certain types of bike racks on campus where it is the only u-lock long enough to work. The minis don't really work unless you are locking up to a post-style rack. The coat-hanger racks and the other kinds don't really work well with a mini.

I also use a cable lock for my wheels.
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Old 02-20-08, 07:12 AM   #6
mike-on-da-bike
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thanks guys yes they been sayin those d-lock ones are best but you gotta be careful not to get the ones that can be picked by a ballpoint pen so they been saying,at the moment i just been taken bike into shops or parking it for short time where the cameras are,most crim wont dare take stuff on candid camera lol and i guess another trick is to engrave you bike so the cant re-sell it.
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Old 02-20-08, 10:48 AM   #7
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...but you gotta be careful not to get the ones that can be picked by a ballpoint pen so they been saying....
If you're buying new, the cyl locks with this problem should be long off the market.

- Mark
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Old 02-20-08, 11:00 AM   #8
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I'm curious, are all brands of cylinder type locks, even those 20 years back, afflicted by the BIC pen problem?

I have some expensive motorcycle locks, Citadel U locks, a few small krypto 'padlocks' for locking a disc brake rotor.
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Old 02-20-08, 11:09 AM   #9
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The lock that is pictured above, New York Fahgettaboudit, is heavy.
You should consider it if you leave your bike at the same place for long time, for example, a rack near your job. Then you don't need to carry it and can just leave it connected to the rack.

I would consider the second u-lock that is light, has a frame mounting bracket, and easy to carry. This is for short trips.

There are also pitlocks if you want to lock the wheels.
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Old 02-20-08, 11:34 AM   #10
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There has been an investigation amongst bicycle thiefs in Holland. Most of them admit they are specialised in opening one type of lock in a matter of seconds. Applying two different types of locks is the best protection, they say.

All thieves say they wouldn't even think about trying to cut a hardened steel chain with a hardened padlock. Those chains require a pressure up to 50.000 newton to be cut. (Muscle operated cutters can deliver up to 3000 newton.)

The ring-type padlocks are the best, as they fit closely on the steel chain, so no tools can be inserted.

Cables, no matter how thick, are very weak protection, they all can be cut easily.

The "D-lock", though it looks very robust, in fact is rather weak also, as the lock itself can easily be forced to give in with a crow bar. The smallest D-lock is the better, as it does not allow a crow bar to be inserted.

Always put a lock on a high position. When the lock or chain is close to the ground, a thief may get extra leverage using his own weight while cutting.

Before I forget, a bike should always be connected to a solid fixed object. If the bike can be put in a car or van, with the lock still on, the thief can work on it in his cosy workshop, using powertools.
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Old 02-20-08, 09:09 PM   #11
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Number 1:
Never leave your bike out over night.


Kryptonite Mini EVO (the orange one)
w/ key lock (not barrel)

It's not as heavy as the Krypto NY forgetaboutit. (yellow)
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Old 02-20-08, 10:03 PM   #12
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even when the bic pen thing became widespread, only a few types of locks were vulnerable to it.

Quote:
Originally Posted by WNG View Post
I'm curious, are all brands of cylinder type locks, even those 20 years back, afflicted by the BIC pen problem?
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Old 02-20-08, 11:10 PM   #13
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Berre View Post
There has been an investigation amongst bicycle thiefs in Holland. Most of them admit they are specialised in opening one type of lock in a matter of seconds. Applying two different types of locks is the best protection, they say.

All thieves say they wouldn't even think about trying to cut a hardened steel chain with a hardened padlock. Those chains require a pressure up to 50.000 newton to be cut. (Muscle operated cutters can deliver up to 3000 newton.)

The ring-type padlocks are the best, as they fit closely on the steel chain, so no tools can be inserted.

Cables, no matter how thick, are very weak protection, they all can be cut easily.

The "D-lock", though it looks very robust, in fact is rather weak also, as the lock itself can easily be forced to give in with a crow bar. The smallest D-lock is the better, as it does not allow a crow bar to be inserted.

Always put a lock on a high position. When the lock or chain is close to the ground, a thief may get extra leverage using his own weight while cutting.



Before I forget, a bike should always be connected to a solid fixed object. If the bike can be put in a car or van, with the lock still on, the thief can work on it in his cosy workshop, using powertools.

Good advice.
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Old 02-21-08, 04:31 AM   #14
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i know you could also ask ya girlfreind to mind the bike outside the shops while you go and spend all the money
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