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Bicycle Mechanics Broken bottom bracket? Tacoed wheel? If you're having problems with your bicycle, or just need help fixing a flat, drop in here for the latest on bicycle mechanics & bicycle maintenance.

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Old 02-23-08, 06:25 AM   #1
H2Row
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Tube...

I was just putting a tube onto my wheel and it popped... Great success! But I had another one which is fine now... Does anyone know why he tube would've popped? :/
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Old 02-23-08, 07:11 AM   #2
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Usually it's because you have the tube pinched under the tire bead somewhere.

When that happens as you inflate the tube it pushes the tire bead out of the rim. Once that starts, the air pressure makes the tube balloon out through the space and it pops before you can reduce the air pressure.
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Old 02-23-08, 07:53 AM   #3
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As RG says, a problem worsened by tubes at the large end of the size range
for the tire. It helps to both eyeball the rim-tire line for obvious undulations
of the tire against the rim, an area where the edge of tire goes up for several
inches and dives back down suggests the bead isn't seated. I generally
roll my wheel uninflated, with the tire seated across the floor for a couple of
revolutions, pushing down with hand pressure to help seat the bead.

Another cause of instant failure is pinching the tube between the pry lever used
to get the last 6" of tire bead over the rim for many tires, this cuts the tube.
Careful attention to keeping the tube well up into the tire helps prevent this.
Some people find putting 2-3# pressure in the tube tends to float it up into
the tire and reduces the risk of pinch flats. You won't get a bang out of this
though like the tire lift off flat. 100# letting loose in 0.2sec sounds like a 22 pistol
going off.

Of course there will be posters with iron thumbs who sneer at us lever users
and just snarl at the tire, which immediately jumps into place on the rim.
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Old 02-23-08, 11:39 AM   #4
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Originally Posted by sch View Post
Of course there will be posters with iron thumbs who sneer at us lever users
and just snarl at the tire, which immediately jumps into place on the rim.
*snarl*

That is indeed my rule of "thumb": Do not use tire levers unless absolutely necessary.

After performing hundreds if not thousands of flat repairs, the technique does tend to get refined. In my experience 90%+ of tire/rim combos can be removed and installed using no tools. For the rest I have a set of steel Park levers that yield to no foe.
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Old 02-23-08, 01:06 PM   #5
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In my experience 90%+ of tire/rim combos can be removed and installed using no tools.
I think this may be true of ultra-light tires on narrow rims, but not my experience on a broad mix of road, cross, and mountain bike tires at all. I try very hard not to use tools and occasionally, I'll get a particular tire/rim combo to yield with just hands, but it's the exception rather than the rule.

- Mark
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Old 02-23-08, 01:11 PM   #6
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I think this may be true of ultra-light tires on narrow rims, but not my experience on a broad mix of road, cross, and mountain bike tires at all. I try very hard not to use tools and occasionally, I'll get a particular tire/rim combo to yield with just hands, but it's the exception rather than the rule.

- Mark
No, I mean on all tire types.

I worked as a carpenter for most of my adult life, so perhaps I just have a stronger grip than most...or just more practice.
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