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Cannondale Road Bike ID please

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Cannondale Road Bike ID please

Old 03-25-08, 07:12 PM
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JTGraphics
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Cannondale Road Bike ID please

Someone gave me a very nice clean Cannondale road bike (vintage) can someone tell me the model and if you'd consider it something to fix back up to road worthy condition only needs minor things for tune up.
Its a Cannondale road bike white has all 105 components. Serial number is 54052287283 Thanks!
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Old 03-25-08, 08:25 PM
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Old 03-25-08, 08:38 PM
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Ok figured out it is a Cannondale SR500 white model so is this worth investing say $200 and ride it? Is this a frame worth saving with its Shimano 105 parts it is in 8/9 condition out of 10.
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Old 03-25-08, 09:30 PM
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Originally Posted by JTGraphics View Post
Ok figured out it is a Cannondale SR500 white model so is this worth investing say $200 and ride it? Is this a frame worth saving with its Shimano 105 parts it is in 8/9 condition out of 10.
What you be spending the $200 on? To get it rideable or to upgrade?
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Old 03-25-08, 09:40 PM
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Would be replacing cables and housings although they seen good bar tape new set of tires and a set of Speedplay x2 pedels. Pedels I have 3 sets on other bikes so I could swap them when needed but rather just have a set on it already. This would get it in very nice riding condition. Would use it maybe once or twice a month.
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Old 03-26-08, 11:21 AM
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Originally Posted by JTGraphics View Post
Would be replacing cables and housings although they seen good bar tape new set of tires and a set of Speedplay x2 pedels. Pedels I have 3 sets on other bikes so I could swap them when needed but rather just have a set on it already. This would get it in very nice riding condition. Would use it maybe once or twice a month.
The housing, cables and tape are regular maintenance and the pedals are preference. I think it'd be worth doing. And shouldn't cost $200.

Is that an aluminum frame? The rear spacing is probably 126mm. If both of those are true, you won't be able to upgrade the drivetrain past 7-speed. But since you're leaving it pretty much stock as a once or twice a month bike, that shouldn't be a worry, but just thought you should think about that.
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Old 03-26-08, 11:37 AM
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JiveTurkey is right - it would make a nice commuter or Saturday-afternoon ride. The "SR" used to be C-dale's "Silk Road" models intended for casual around-town use. They are nice, comfortable frames and if there are no cracks or bends, will last pretty much forever.

One suggestion: Shimano makes a nice upgrade kit for the older 7-speeds (and also for 8-speeds) that lets you convert to Tiagra-model brifters. For $150 - $180 you get the shifters and bosses to replace the downtube levers, new cables too. You don't need new derailers. I don't know how many of those I have installed for friends in order to get an old bike back on the road for minimal expense. Your LBS can order this set or you can find it online. Comes with instructions and you can also find instructions at Sheldon Brown's site (which is where I got this same advice many moons ago).

Frankly, I think a set of inexpensive tires and the Tiagra brifters would make this a new bike for the approx $200 figure you had in mind - assuming you already have the pedals. I built a commuter out of an old C-dale frame using this method and put some inexpensive Vittoria Zaffiro 25c tires on it ($32 for the pair) and it's a very handy bike for running to the store.
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Old 03-26-08, 03:14 PM
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This bike is a very early 6-speed 105 SIS and uses a 6-speed freewheel according to the catalog. An upgrade to 7-speed can be done with a new freewheel or it will require a new rear wheel if the OP wants to use cassettes. Obviously 7-speed shifters of some type will be needed too.

I'm not sure if SIS rear derailleurs of that vintage were as universally compatible as newer ones either.
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Old 03-26-08, 03:27 PM
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The big problem with that bike is that you have it and I do not. You can mitigate that fact by making a really nice bike out of it.
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Old 03-26-08, 03:31 PM
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Originally Posted by JiveTurkey View Post
Is that an aluminum frame? The rear spacing is probably 126mm. If both of those are true, you won't be able to upgrade the drivetrain past 7-speed. But since you're leaving it pretty much stock as a once or twice a month bike, that shouldn't be a worry, but just thought you should think about that.
You can't cold set the frame but there's enough spring in the rear triangle to put a 130mm road wheel in there if JTGraphics wanted to go to an 8-9 or 10 speed. If you go STI, you'll need the adapters for the downtube shifters.

However, new wheels, shifters, cassette, (probably) rear derailer and chain will definitely run more then $200...even if you could find all the stuff on Fleabay. Not sure it's worth it on a 1987 bike.
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Old 03-26-08, 08:43 PM
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Originally Posted by cyclesick View Post
I disagree. I have that EXACT frame. I cold set it to 130mm 5yrs. ago. Since then I've put over 1500m a year on it,[approaching 10,000m], and have had no problems with the frame what so ever.......To say that it can't be done is a myth,[just like the myth that a heat treated aluminum frame can't be welded.
I believe this prohibition got started when a lot of Al frames were bonded, not welded. The stress of cold setting on the glued joints was likely to cause early (or immediate) failure.
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Old 03-26-08, 08:43 PM
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Thanks everyone I will look at some options I have, I may be willing to make this a little project since I have none right now I may have a few more questions later after I think about this.
Here are some photos of this bike so you all can see its condition.
https://www.jtgraphics.net/cannondale_sr500.htm
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Old 03-26-08, 09:23 PM
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Beautiful bike in excellent condition. Nice find.
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Old 03-27-08, 07:24 AM
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Originally Posted by cyclesick View Post
I disagree. I have that EXACT frame. I cold set it to 130mm 5yrs. ago. Since then I've put over 1500m a year on it,[approaching 10,000m], and have had no problems with the frame what so ever. I weigh 250 to 270lbs. and I'm a moutain biker at heart, so I'm constantly bunny-hoping curbs and parking stops at 20 to 30mph. To say that it can't be done is a myth,[just like the myth that a heat treated aluminum frame can't be welded. Some thing else that I've done quite frequently with out a single failure]. This is propaganda started and maintained by the industry for the purpose of covering thie collective butts. And rightly so. Aluminum has some very unpredictable characteristics. I suggest that the average layman avoid tampering with thier frame at all cost. However, both of these proceedures can be successfuly performed but you must have a great deal more knowledge of the metalugic compositions than the average bike tech.
So which is it? Can cold set or avoid tampering? It's easy to do or you need a great deal of specialized knowledge? You can't have it both ways.

Aluminum is a metaloid and as such doesn't have the ductility of most other metals. If you bend aluminum and anneal it to stay in that shape and then try to rebend it again, it's crystal structure is such that it needs to be reannealed to realign the crystal structure. You might get away with it...as you have...or you might not be so lucky.

And, if you had bother to read what I wrote beyond the first remark, you would see that I've said (and been saying for literally years) that a 4mm difference isn't enough to cold set any frame...steel, aluminum, titanium, lead, Lanthanum or Unobtainum.
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Old 03-27-08, 08:50 AM
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Originally Posted by nagsheadlocal View Post
The "SR" used to be C-dale's "Silk Road" models intended for casual around-town use.
The SR bike listed was intended for racing use. Later Cdale dropped the "S" and kept just the R (when the 3.0s came out I believe). When they came out with a front suspension road bike, it became the "SR" for Silk Road. However, in this generation of frame, all road bikes were "SR".

That particular frame is very, very stiff. It does crack if you let it happen. The rear triangle is stiff enough that they used to have ads with a guy standing on the rear triangle while the frame was on its side, with no wheel in the frame. It would flex about an inch total with 150-170 lbs of people standing on it.

The frame tubing was spec'ed based on SL tubing - engineers got the equivalent strength aluminum tube as an SL tube, tube by tube. They realized they really overbuilt the frame and so redesigned it as soon as they were able. That's when the 3.0 series came out. One of the original designers sheepishly admitted this to me over a chat at a bike race.

We called the frames "5.0" after the 3.0 came out. We were all young guys who thought the 5.0 Mustang was the coolest cheap car around so we all dreamed about it. The only 5.0s we could afford were our self named Cannondales.

My 5.0 is sitting in the basement, waiting to be cleaned up and hung up somewhere on display. My 3.0 is waiting to be rebuilt as a complete bike.

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Old 03-27-08, 09:44 AM
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The 3.0 used the SR and SM designations. I think it was the 2.8 that dropped the "S".
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Old 03-27-08, 12:18 PM
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Originally Posted by carpediemracing View Post
The frame tubing was spec'ed based on SL tubing - engineers got the equivalent strength aluminum tube as an SL tube, tube by tube. They realized they really overbuilt the frame and so redesigned it as soon as they were able. That's when the 3.0 series came out. One of the original designers sheepishly admitted this to me over a chat at a bike race.
That's an interesting bit of history, thanks for the correx. If the 3.0 series was a major revision, when was the next major redesign - the hourglass seatstays?
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Old 03-27-08, 12:43 PM
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So would you guys say the bike is worth keeping and investing a little into (it was free), it is road worthy now but would replace tires, tubes and bar tape since they are original I trued the wheels last night and are in good shape. I'd say in the long run I would want to replace the wheels go to cassette and at that time move the shifters off the down tubes but thats it (few minor parts) I figure when its all over I'd have about $400 into it over the 6 months. I know I could get a new road bike but I'd be looking at one thats in the $1300 $1800 range if I bought a new one. I'm not a racer so as long as it would be a decent ride I'd be happy for awhile but it will get used when the wife doesn't want to go on rides which our tandem is used for.
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Old 03-27-08, 06:05 PM
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Originally Posted by demoncyclist View Post
The 3.0 used the SR and SM designations. I think it was the 2.8 that dropped the "S".
Well, yes and no. When the 2.8 came out, Cannondale did drop the "S" from most bikes, but then added the previously mentioned head shock road bikes. Those bikes used the term "Silk Road" with the Head Shock logo and continued to use the "SR" term. I've got one, a '96 SR500 with head shock and 2.8 frame.
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Old 03-27-08, 06:11 PM
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Originally Posted by JTGraphics View Post
So would you guys say the bike is worth keeping and investing a little into (it was free), it is road worthy now but would replace tires, tubes and bar tape since they are original I trued the wheels last night and are in good shape. I'd say in the long run I would want to replace the wheels go to cassette and at that time move the shifters off the down tubes but thats it (few minor parts) I figure when its all over I'd have about $400 into it over the 6 months. I know I could get a new road bike but I'd be looking at one thats in the $1300 $1800 range if I bought a new one. I'm not a racer so as long as it would be a decent ride I'd be happy for awhile but it will get used when the wife doesn't want to go on rides which our tandem is used for.
I have two older Cannondales, a 91 SR400 and a 96 SR500. I ride my 96 all the time. Still, I wouldn't put $400 into that bike or the 91, but that's me. I did upgrade the 96 from 7 speed rear to 9 speed 105 this year and I replaced the stem, but that's about it.
These are nice bikes that get respect because of the name, but I don't think you can recover a $400 investment on resale.
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Old 03-27-08, 06:14 PM
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That's a nice bike I have a trek that is similar too it. 7 speed is fine and as an advantage it is cheaper to replace the parts such as cassette/chain. Cables and housing and fresh tape should not cost more than $25.
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Old 03-27-08, 06:29 PM
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The real question you should ask is "Do I really need to own four bicycles?"
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Old 03-27-08, 08:29 PM
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Big thanks to all the input!. So I guess I figured out what I'll do this ride, I'm going to just replace bar tape, new tires and tubes and that's about it and ride it. I do have a like new pair of Shimano 600 brake levers and brakes which are like new should I use them on this or just leave the 105's.
I removed everything and re-packed and lubed and am putting it back together now it's looking good for how old it is. I think I will replace the wheel nipples at least so truing will be much easer they are very tight from sitting so long with out any care.
So I will have very little in this project and will enjoy riding it I'm sure. Thanks everyone for your input it was of great help on deciding on what route to take with it. I'll get a nice road bike later in the year.

And do I need 4 bikes probably not but what the heck, I have 4 cars thats not good and I seem to ride my bikes more now thats dumb..
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Old 03-28-08, 08:21 AM
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Originally Posted by JTGraphics View Post
Big thanks to all the input!. So I guess I figured out what I'll do this ride, I'm going to just replace bar tape, new tires and tubes and that's about it and ride it. I do have a like new pair of Shimano 600 brake levers and brakes which are like new should I use them on this or just leave the 105's.
I removed everything and re-packed and lubed and am putting it back together now it's looking good for how old it is. I think I will replace the wheel nipples at least so truing will be much easer they are very tight from sitting so long with out any care.
So I will have very little in this project and will enjoy riding it I'm sure. Thanks everyone for your input it was of great help on deciding on what route to take with it. I'll get a nice road bike later in the year.

And do I need 4 bikes probably not but what the heck, I have 4 cars thats not good and I seem to ride my bikes more now thats dumb..
I don't think that the 600s are an upgrade from the 105 brakes. A set of dual pivot modern road brakes would be a very good upgrade but not necessary. Ride it as is and see what you like and don't like before you go putting a lot of money in it. It's worth a few hundred in upgrades but not a few thousand
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Old 03-28-08, 08:38 AM
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Originally Posted by cyccommute View Post
So which is it? Can cold set or avoid tampering? It's easy to do or you need a great deal of specialized knowledge? You can't have it both ways.

Aluminum is a metaloid and as such doesn't have the ductility of most other metals. If you bend aluminum and anneal it to stay in that shape and then try to rebend it again, it's crystal structure is such that it needs to be reannealed to realign the crystal structure. You might get away with it...as you have...or you might not be so lucky.

And, if you had bother to read what I wrote beyond the first remark, you would see that I've said (and been saying for literally years) that a 4mm difference isn't enough to cold set any frame...steel, aluminum, titanium, lead, Lanthanum or Unobtainum.
Cyclesick,

I'm sorry if I came across a little to gruffly. I did and I apologize. However you do need to clear up you point a little. Your post could be read as it's okay to cold set aluminum and you'll never have a problem. I'm not sure that most people would understand your point about it's not something that should be attempted by the average home shop mechanic.
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