Go Back  Bike Forums > Bike Forums > Bicycle Mechanics
Reload this Page >

What Parts Do I Need for These Upgrades?

Notices
Bicycle Mechanics Broken bottom bracket? Tacoed wheel? If you're having problems with your bicycle, or just need help fixing a flat, drop in here for the latest on bicycle mechanics & bicycle maintenance.

What Parts Do I Need for These Upgrades?

Old 09-11-08, 08:07 AM
  #1  
globe9
Southern Grrl
Thread Starter
 
globe9's Avatar
 
Join Date: Apr 2005
Location: New Orleans, LA
Posts: 86

Bikes: Marin Hawk Hill, Trek 800

Mentioned: 0 Post(s)
Tagged: 0 Thread(s)
Quoted: 6 Post(s)
Likes: 0
Liked 0 Times in 0 Posts
What Parts Do I Need for These Upgrades?

I currently own a 2005 Marin Hawk Hill. With Fall approaching down here, I really plan on doing on a lot more riding when the weather gets nice(or make that bearable lol). I've been looking at some parts online and would like to upgrade the bike a bit....hopefully by myself. Luckily, one of my roommates seems to know about bikes and has offered to help with the upgrades. I'd like to upgrade the front and rear der. to either Shimano or SRAM higher end stuff(LX or X7 stuff). How do I know what size to get...some of the specs are confusing to me). Also want to upgrade to disc brakes. Can I do this with the 05 Hawk Hill? Was also considering SRAM twist shifters instead of the trigger shifters I currently have(I just prefer them). What do I need to get that will work on my bike? Anyone know of anything specifically? I need specific parts and models cause that is what I will order online. I'm new to this stuff and a girl, but I'm really interested in biking and I'd like to know more about the mechanics of it all.

This is a link to my bike with specs:

https://www.bikepedia.com/QuickBike/B...Hill&Type=bike

My bike does NOT currently have disc brakes however like these specs state. I have the basic Hawk Hill model and I think it has V-Brakes. I'm assuming that since this frame does have disc brakes, that mine should be able to be upgraded? Am I wasting my time upgrading this frame? I thought that Marin made a decent frame and this would be more economical than buying a brand new bike. Any thoughts?

Last night I finally attempted to swap out my tires with some new ones I got a few months ago. Not quite as easy as I thought it would be. Took about 20 minutes just to get the old tire off the front rim. It was a pain in the *****. I didn't have a tire lever or anything, just did it by hand. The new tire went on much more easily. Still have to do the back tire...but I had to get to bed last night and didn't expect the front tire to take so long and be so hard to get off.

Thanks for any and all responses. I could really use ya'll's advice, suggestions, and help.
globe9 is offline  
Old 09-11-08, 09:28 AM
  #2  
CACycling
Senior Member
 
CACycling's Avatar
 
Join Date: Feb 2008
Location: Oxnard, CA
Posts: 4,567

Bikes: 2009 Fuji Roubaix RC; 2011 Fuji Cross 2.0; '92 Diamond Back Ascent EX

Mentioned: 0 Post(s)
Tagged: 0 Thread(s)
Quoted: 3 Post(s)
Liked 9 Times in 7 Posts
What are your current components not doing for you? I understand changing the shifters if you don't like the ones you have (although I would think grip shift to be a downgrade) but upgrading derailers isn't going to do much for you unless you have problems with the current ones. Going disc would require new hubs, which usually means new wheels, in addition to all the disc brake parts (your forks have tabs but not sure if the frame does - without tabs on the frame you can't change the rear brakes) which probably isn't worth the money.

I would suggest starting by getting some basic tools (I assume as you don't even have tire levers you don't have much of a bike tool box) and start doing some routine servicing of your bike. Get to know it and how it works before starting to make changes just for the sake of change. And being a girl is no excuse for not wrenching on your own bike so get to work.
CACycling is offline  
Old 09-11-08, 09:45 AM
  #3  
UnsafeAlpine
Domestic Domestique
 
UnsafeAlpine's Avatar
 
Join Date: Dec 2007
Location: Michigan
Posts: 1,742

Bikes: Brand New Old Catamount! Schwinn Homegrown, Specialized FSR, Salsa Vaya, Salsa Chile Con Crosso

Mentioned: 0 Post(s)
Tagged: 0 Thread(s)
Quoted: 6 Post(s)
Likes: 0
Liked 2 Times in 2 Posts
What he said. I would just add, what type of riding are you doing? If you're doing light to moderate trail riding, your current setup is fine, unless you're having issues. Gripshift is not a downgrade if you really prefer them. If I remember correctly, you will need Gripshift specific derailuers to go with the actual shifters.

Sheldon Brown's website has an incredible amount of information. I would also get a light tool kit. Good luck, and have fun!
UnsafeAlpine is offline  
Old 09-11-08, 09:59 AM
  #4  
Joshua A.C. New
Senior Member
 
Joshua A.C. New's Avatar
 
Join Date: Aug 2007
Location: Northampton, MA
Posts: 956

Bikes: Iron Monkey: a junkyard steel 26" slick-tired city bike. Grey Fox: A Trek 7x00 frame, painted, with everything built, from spokes up. Jet Jaguar: A 92 Cannondale R900 frame, powder coated matte black with red and aluminum highlights.

Mentioned: 0 Post(s)
Tagged: 0 Thread(s)
Quoted: 1 Post(s)
Likes: 0
Liked 0 Times in 0 Posts
Yeah, I'm inclined to agree with CACycling there. Replace things as they break and get the tools you need at the time. If you want to change to a different kind of shifter, you'll learn some stuff, but for the most part, just making sure that everything's working the best it can will teach you more dollar per dollar than arbitrary upgrades.

Upgrades that make immediate, noticeable impacts on my riding: better tires (usually slicker for me, but for you it might be better tread or more puncture resistance), a saddle that doesn't hurt my goodies, pedals that are comfortable, a stem that puts my body in a comfortable position.

For each of these things, you need some tools, most of them specialized. Start with that stuff and you'll immediately feel the benefits, both on your bike and in your knowledge-hole for much less money.

Like, I suggest you go out right now and get a pair of tire levers. They're about $3. If you don't have hex wrenches, get a full metric set. That should be $10-$15. Eventually, you'll need a pedal wrench, cone wrenches, spoke wrenches, and all that jazz. But you can pick them up as you need them.

You're a mountain biker. You'll bust your derailleur soon enough. When you do, get the one you want and you'll learn some new stuff, including how to change a chain.

Contrariwise, if you really need disk brakes and your frame can handle them, you're looking at several hundred dollars for new wheels and brakes. You'll learn relatively little, other than how to mount and calibrate disk brakes.

If you like grip shifters more, go for it though. That's a relatively low-cost endeavor and you'll learn all about shifters. All you'll need are the hex wrenches. You may need to switch brake levers at the same time, which is also low-cost and informative.

Do things one at a time, too. That way, you won't find yourself with a pile of bike parts on the floor, unable to ride tomorrow.
Joshua A.C. New is offline  
Old 09-11-08, 09:59 AM
  #5  
globe9
Southern Grrl
Thread Starter
 
globe9's Avatar
 
Join Date: Apr 2005
Location: New Orleans, LA
Posts: 86

Bikes: Marin Hawk Hill, Trek 800

Mentioned: 0 Post(s)
Tagged: 0 Thread(s)
Quoted: 6 Post(s)
Likes: 0
Liked 0 Times in 0 Posts
Thanks for the replies CA and Unsafe. I'm doing very basic trail riding, so I guess I'll take ya'll's advice and stick with my current derailleur's for now until something breaks and I need to replace.

I prefer grip shifters and I am aware that 99% of them are made by SRAM and will probably need SRAM components to run them right? Any suggestions on what model I could use with my current setup? I'll need specific model and brand info. Also will need an SRAM derailleur to run the SRAM grip shifters I'm assuming? Does size matter? Long cage etc? I don't know anything about it. What should I buy?

Here's a link to my specs from the Marin website: https://www.marinbikes.com/bicycles_2...hawk_hill.html

Also, I see from this site that my frame is disc mount ready. Does this mean I can just install the brakes w/out adding tabs, many parts etc?

I'm am def. interested in learning to wrench myself as I find it very interesting and enjoyable, if not just a little daunting as I'm not all that mechanically inclined, but I do want to learn.

Thanks again!
globe9 is offline  
Old 09-11-08, 10:04 AM
  #6  
globe9
Southern Grrl
Thread Starter
 
globe9's Avatar
 
Join Date: Apr 2005
Location: New Orleans, LA
Posts: 86

Bikes: Marin Hawk Hill, Trek 800

Mentioned: 0 Post(s)
Tagged: 0 Thread(s)
Quoted: 6 Post(s)
Likes: 0
Liked 0 Times in 0 Posts
Josh, thanks for the reply. I'm getting what ya'll are saying and thanks for the advice. I guess from reading many threads on here where it seems like everyone just wants to upgrade stuff, I thought that was the way to go, but I think I'll let things wear out and/or break before replacing parts....other than the grip shifters, which from looking online, shouldn't be too expensive to add, but will I need a new derailleur to run the SRAM shifters?

And one more question...so if I were to get disc brakes and even though my frame has disc mounts, i would still need new wheels? When ya'll say "wheels" ya'll mean the rims, spokes, etc right? Basically the thing that the tire goes on?
globe9 is offline  
Old 09-11-08, 10:13 AM
  #7  
BCRider
Senior Member
 
BCRider's Avatar
 
Join Date: Mar 2008
Location: The 'Wack, BC, Canada
Posts: 5,466

Bikes: Norco (2), Miyata, Canondale, Soma, Redline

Mentioned: 0 Post(s)
Tagged: 0 Thread(s)
Quoted: 7 Post(s)
Likes: 0
Liked 3 Times in 3 Posts
If your bike and the parts are as specified in the link of your last post then you don't need to do much at all to go disc. According to the specs your hubs are supposed to be disc ready and you say the frame has tabs. It's easy to check. On the non drive side there should be a couple of fairly meaty looking mounting points that stick up like ears and these holes will NOT have any threads in them. THose will be your disc mount tabs. If there is another hole or two that are threaded those are rack or fender mounting points.

THe specs say you have disc ready hubs. Again you can easily check this for yourself. Loot at the left side of the hubs. There should be shoulder of 6 tabs formed into the hub and there will be threaded holes in them. This is where the disc attaches. If you don't see that is there a rubber cup on there that you can remove? Look for a spline under the cup. If there is one then you've got Shimano Centerlock hubs and will need to buy centerlock rotors.

If you're in doubt about any of this wander in and out of the Shimao site to find your hub model number and also look at hub pictures in the online stores to get familiar with what they look like. Or take some pictures of your own hubs from close up (and not fuzzy) and we can tell you more.

But at the moment it seems like going disc will be a piece o' cake.

A lot of the SRAM twist shifters are Shimano compatible. If you go this way then just make sure you get a model that is compatible. Also the Deore derrailleur is a pretty good one. I'm running two of them and have LX, XT and even one XTR on other bikes. The XTR shifts better than the rest but between the Deore, LX and XT there isn't any difference that I can feel. You just need to make sure that whichever you have is kept in good working order and adjusted properly and that the frame's hanger is properly aligned. That last one can sneak up on you since they are so easily bent.

Last edited by BCRider; 09-11-08 at 10:17 AM.
BCRider is offline  
Old 09-11-08, 10:17 AM
  #8  
UnsafeAlpine
Domestic Domestique
 
UnsafeAlpine's Avatar
 
Join Date: Dec 2007
Location: Michigan
Posts: 1,742

Bikes: Brand New Old Catamount! Schwinn Homegrown, Specialized FSR, Salsa Vaya, Salsa Chile Con Crosso

Mentioned: 0 Post(s)
Tagged: 0 Thread(s)
Quoted: 6 Post(s)
Likes: 0
Liked 2 Times in 2 Posts
The hubs are the center part of the wheel and hold the disc part of the disc brakes. To change over from V-Brakes to discs, you'll need the hubs that hold the discs and, unless you're ready to build a wheel, you'll probably just buy a whole new wheel. Yeah, the thing the tire goes onto You sound like you're getting the vocabulary down. That's a good start!

As far as the shifting goes, Sram X-7 shifters use a 1:1 shift ratio. Shimano derailleurs use 2:1. All this means is that you won't be able to use the same derailleurs. There are other shifters that will work with Shimano derailleurs, though.
UnsafeAlpine is offline  
Old 09-11-08, 10:20 AM
  #9  
DMF 
Elitist Troglodyte
 
DMF's Avatar
 
Join Date: Jun 2006
Location: Dallas
Posts: 6,924

Bikes: 03 Raleigh Professional (steel)

Mentioned: 0 Post(s)
Tagged: 0 Thread(s)
Quoted: 0 Post(s)
Likes: 0
Liked 1 Time in 1 Post
Originally Posted by globe9 View Post
I prefer grip shifters and I am aware that 99% of them are made by SRAM and will probably need SRAM components to run them right?
No. Some SRAM shifters use a unique pull ratio (1:1) and require the corresponding RD. But everything else is interchangeable with what you've got. Check the SRAM site for details.
__________________
Stupidity got us into this mess - why can't it get us out?

- Will Rogers
DMF is offline  

Posting Rules
You may not post new threads
You may not post replies
You may not post attachments
You may not edit your posts

BB code is On
Smilies are On
[IMG] code is On
HTML code is Off


Thread Tools
Search this Thread

Contact Us - Archive - Advertising - Cookie Policy - Privacy Statement - Terms of Service - Do Not Sell My Personal Information -

Copyright 2021 MH Sub I, LLC dba Internet Brands. All rights reserved. Use of this site indicates your consent to the Terms of Use.