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What Should the LBS Charge for This?

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What Should the LBS Charge for This?

Old 09-22-08, 08:34 AM
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nolagrrl
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What Should the LBS Charge for This?

I have a 2008 Cannodale F6 that I am upgrading to Avid BB7 disc brakes and Avid Speed Dial levers. For this upgrade I also bought a Sun Rhynolite with Deore Hubs wheelset that is disc ready, since the stock wheelset is not.

I had considered doing the install myself after watching some how to videos on You Tube. It really doesn't look that difficult, but then it was pointed out to me that I will have to take the cassette off the old wheels and install it on the new wheels. I was also told that I would need some specialized tools(torque wrench, torx wrench, cable cutters, cassette remover, etc.) After looking online and seeing how much these tools cost, I'm realizing that this could add up.

How much would/should a LBS charge for a disc installation, brake lever install, cassette install? I know the price will vary from shop to shop, but I'm trying to get a general idea just to see which method I should choose.

Keep in mind, I bought all parts online thinking I would do the install myself. Will the LBS be a little pissed that I didn't buy any parts from them and cop an attitude(I've read about this on these boards from time to time)?

Thanks for any insight, advice, etc.
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Old 09-22-08, 08:45 AM
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Well I just called one of the LBS and told them what kind of bike I have and what I need done and they won't give me a quote unless I bring the bike down there so they can properly "evaluate" it. Is this common? I don't want to have bring the bike to every bike shop in town just to get a quote on what seems like it should be a simple install and easy to quote....am I wrong here? I don't want to go down there, get told some ridiculous price, then have to leave and go to the next place and see what they say.

I don't mind getting a general quote, and once I decide that that is the LBS I will use, if something comes up and the price is a little more, I don't mind paying a little more.

Any ideas here? Thanks again!
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Old 09-22-08, 09:00 AM
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Jay H
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I can't really answer your question about how much it would cost, but since your bike has to be fairly new (2008), you'd think they'd be able to give you a general ballpark figure since I'd assume they wouldn't run into anything insane like putting disc brakes on an old bike without the propert disc tabs, etc. Try some other bike shops or wait for somebody here with more info.

I've managed to survive all these years of being my own wrench by borrowing cable cutters or just having my bike shop cut them (they do it for free) since I don't own a specialized bike cable cutter. However, you can probably get away with cutting brake cable housing with a good die-cutter or wire cutters since the sheathing on brake cables is just a spiral metal sheath. Derailleur cables need the special tool since they use wire beads which will completely crumble if you try it with a standard wire cutter. At least I can cut brake housings myself and I do.

I have a cassette tool which is a pretty handy tool to have, whether you are installing new brakes and want to switch your cassette to a new disc brake compatible wheel. Consider that your cassette on your rear wheel is a wearable item and you'll have to replace them as well as your chain and/or jockey pulleys sooner or later, it's worth the $12 Shimano Cassette tool, me thinks.

You can get by without a torque wrench, although I have one, I don't use it too often, so long as you don't manhandle/gorilla things and you check the tension on occasion.. I've lived all these years. I have a couple of torque wrenchs, but honestly, I don't always use them and actually most of them were bought for my car's mechanicals.

As far as your LBS's attitude... With labor and all that, if you have to have the LBS do the brake swap, it might of been cheaper to just buy it from them if they will do the conversion for free, but it sounds like it's too late for you...

Jay
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Old 09-22-08, 09:43 AM
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Originally Posted by nolagrrl View Post
Well I just called one of the LBS and told them what kind of bike I have and what I need done and they won't give me a quote unless I bring the bike down there so they can properly "evaluate" it. Is this common?
The devil is in the details. Existance or lack of caliper mounts and location or lack of cable guides will have a huge impact on the time required. I'd want to see the bike before giving a price too.
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Old 09-22-08, 09:54 AM
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Thanks for the replies.

I understand now that their are some details that could effect price. In general though, what price am I looking at? $75, $100, $200? If it starts getting up there, like in the $150-$200 range for this installation, I think I will attempt it myself.
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Old 09-22-08, 10:07 AM
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Originally Posted by nolagrrl View Post
Thanks for the replies.

I understand now that their are some details that could effect price. In general though, what price am I looking at? $75, $100, $200? If it starts getting up there, like in the $150-$200 range for this installation, I think I will attempt it myself.
I'm thinking the choices would be more like either "$50.00 plus parts" or "I don't want to do it."
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Old 09-22-08, 10:08 AM
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Originally Posted by nolagrrl View Post
I understand now that their are some details that could effect price. In general though, what price am I looking at? $75, $100, $200? If it starts getting up there, like in the $150-$200 range for this installation, I think I will attempt it myself.
Your investment to do the work yourself will be substantial as you noted so this job will be rather expensive if you do it yourself. However, the next time you need to change a cassette, replace cables, do brake maintenance, etc., the tools will be FREE!

In other words, don't evaluate the cost of the tools as part of this one installation. Good tools are a long term investment and will pay back their cost many, many times over the years.
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Old 09-22-08, 02:09 PM
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You might consider breaking the job into two parts and installing the cassette yourself. As JH says, the tool is fairly inexpensive and likely to get future use for replacement or upgrading of a cassette; however, you will also need a "chain whip" to remove the currently installed cassette lockring, to keep the cassette from spinning. A basic bike tool kit (e.g. http://www.pricepoint.com/detail/145...--21-Tools.htm ) will include both the cassette tool and chain whip, along with other bike-specific tools and the always-essential hex wrench set.

If you haven't already, spend $20 for Zinn's mountain bike maintenance book or for the Bicycling magazine mountain bike maintenance book. Both describe the bike tools and their uses, maintenance/repair/installation taks, and also have useful tips and reference info. If nothing else, you will be able to figure out from such a book roughly how much time and which tools each task should take.

Regarding supplying your own parts, just as with auto repair shops, bike shops (a) cannot vouch for the quality of such parts and have no way to warranty them once installed and (b) typically depend on profits from parts for a significant portion of the shop's income. Some shops will therefore not want to work with them, while others will do so as long as you understand that you are responsible for replacing any defective parts under warranty.

Finally, I'd suggest taking 3 or 4 photos of your bike, both overall and closeups of the current brakes and wheel hub/dropout areas, print them out, and bring or fax those to any shop that wants to see the bike for an estimate. I agree that it shouldn't be that hard to get a ballpark estimate, even if it has to have qualifications (e.g. "as long as your fork and frame have disc caliper mounts").
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