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N00b thoughts on tire/tube removal

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N00b thoughts on tire/tube removal

Old 09-22-08, 06:13 PM
  #1  
Indie
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N00b thoughts on tire/tube removal

1) If the bike shop guy says a tube slightly wider than you need will work, be skeptical. A 1.75" tube will get pinched between a 1 3/8" rim and tire.

2) Kevlar bead tires are a pain. How do I make my hands stronger? I can't get the tire onto the rim without a second pair of hands.

3) Does the soapy water trick really work to prevent pinches?

4) Make sure you seat the valve in straight when you put the tube on the rim, otherwise it'll stick out at an angle and I'm guessing will put undue stress on the tube.
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Old 09-22-08, 07:21 PM
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ScrubJ
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1) Yup

2) ALL of my tires are kevlar, most can be put on almost one handed. Keep working at it.

3) I'm usually stuck changing my tube on the side opf the road, no soapy water there.

4) Right again.
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Old 09-22-08, 07:29 PM
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1. True in most cases. With those size differences, you're talking more than a quarter of an inch. That's too much. However, a couple millimeters here and there is no big deal, as long as you're careful with the tube while installing. After popping the tire back onto the rim on both sides, use your hands to push the tire back from the rim and look to make sure the tube isn't pinched. Do this on both sides and it'll make sure the tire is seated properly, and that the tube is in the tire properly. You'll also be more confident pumping a tire up to 120psi if you know the tubes not gonna go BANG on you.

2. Try stretching the tire out before you put it on the rim.

3. Use the method outlined in step 1, and don't hop curbs, and you won't have pinches.

4. Yes. It'll rip the tube at the stem.
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Old 09-22-08, 07:55 PM
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Originally Posted by Indie View Post
A 1.75" tube will get pinched between a 1 3/8" rim and tire.
With a 1.75 tube and a 1 3/8 rim, the issue is diameter, not width. A 1.75 tube would work just fine in a 26 X 1.4" tire though.
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Old 09-22-08, 08:21 PM
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1. The width isn't that big of a deal, but the diameter size between fractional and decimal will cause a problem.

2. I agree, Kevlar beads are a pain, but not because they are hard to stretch on. They are a pain for me to start them on the rim without falling off. Steel beads just seem to sit in place better for me.

If this is the same tire as the 1.75 tube vs. the 1 3/8 tube, then the diameter is wrong. If you are trying to get a 26x1.75 (559 mm diameter) on a 1 3/8 (597 or 590 mm diameter) rim, then yes you will need much stronger hands and the tire won't fit.

3. Soapy water can help get the tire on a tight fitting rim, like Maxxis or a Campagnolo. I had to use some the other day. I couldn't get the tube to lay inside the tire otherwise.

4. Not that important. Usually after the tire is on, you can slide it around to get the valve straight. But it is a good idea to try to do it from the start.
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Old 09-22-08, 09:32 PM
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2) you need to guide the beads of the kevlar tires on with your hands a little more closely and pay attention to keeping more tension on them as you let the tire slip through your hands as you're guiding it onto the rim. Try to concentrate on keeping the bead in the middle of the rim's tire channel.

The first side typically goes on with no issue or tools. If you need a tire lever then you probably didn't ensure that the bead stayed centered in the rim's channel.

Inflate the tube so it's not firm but definetly stays round. That'll almost completely avoid pinching it.

When you guide the second bead onto the rim work it around until it gets tight. NOW you may need to let out some air from the tube. Use one hand and a knee to hold the tire at the crossover points and use your other hand to continually and repeatedly push the bead down to the center of the rim channel while pushing the bead over with the hand at the crossover. The ONLY secret to seating the tire is keeping the already mounted part of the bead dead center in the middle of that tire channel. Most kevlar tires won't need a lever at all and only a few need a snap or two of a lever right at the end if you work that already mounted bead down with a religious dedication and fervor.

Show me someone that's having trouble mounting almost any tire and I'll show you someone that isn't keeping the bead centered as well as they should be.
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Old 09-22-08, 09:49 PM
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Girls can do it, so can you.
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Old 09-23-08, 07:23 AM
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Originally Posted by gmcttr
Girls can do it, so can you.
I am a girl, so thanks, it's good to know. Good hints there.

Originally Posted by SweetLou
If this is the same tire as the 1.75 tube vs. the 1 3/8 tube, then the diameter is wrong.
Nope, the tire and the rim are both 1 3/8". It's just the tube that's the oddball. I do have a 1 3/8" tube somewhere.

Originally Posted by SweetLou
Soapy water can help get the tire on a tight fitting rim, like Maxxis or a Campagnolo. I had to use some the other day. I couldn't get the tube to lay inside the tire otherwise.
These are the old steel rims on my Twenty. Just looking at them and looking at the new alloy rims I bought for my wheelbuilding course, the old rims seem to have a huge lip on them. I've had no trouble getting the tires on and off my mountain bike.

Originally Posted by BCRider
The ONLY secret to seating the tire is keeping the already mounted part of the bead dead center in the middle of that tire channel.
Having a tube that's too big is definitely going to get in the way of this. Okay, I have some ideas, thanks.

Last edited by Indie; 09-23-08 at 08:54 AM.
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Old 09-23-08, 09:26 AM
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When I install a new kevlar bead tire the first thing that I do is to put enough air into the inner tube to give it shape. Then I fit the new, flat tire around the inner tube. Only then do I start to install the tire onto the rim.

After the tire's been on the rim once it gets some shape and is much easier to install. I still always install the inner tube into the tire before I put either bead of the tire onto the rim. It's easier expecially if you have deep section rims and long stem inner tubes.
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Old 09-23-08, 10:03 AM
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Originally Posted by Retro Grouch View Post
When I install a new kevlar bead tire the first thing that I do is to put enough air into the inner tube to give it shape. Then I fit the new, flat tire around the inner tube. Only then do I start to install the tire onto the rim.
That sounds like it would help avoid pinches. I'll give it a shot.

I've actually had this tire on the bike before. I put it on earlier in the summer, and a few weeks later ended up with a flat that I assumed was a pinch. I'm replacing the tube because the old tube turned out not to be pinched -- the only place it's leaking from is the valve itself (air bubbles out slowly when I hold it underwater inflated).
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Old 09-23-08, 10:29 AM
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im quite a ***** about my tires--- my fortezzas are hand formed onto my perfect rims---
I dont have a problem-- because I know how to fix my sht--- I dont whine about tire size, tube size-- stem problems blah,blah----- I let girls pinch my butt when I fix my stuff because
nothing like this bothers me--- and I can fix my sht in 5 min....................................i am a low life that rides high maintanance..........every gd day..... urp!
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