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Shimano cassette compatability

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Shimano cassette compatability

Old 03-15-09, 11:14 PM
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tmh657 
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Shimano cassette compatability

I have an Ultegra 6500 9 speed, 12-23 cassette that is pretty worn.
Can I replace it with a Dura Ace 7700 9 speed 12-25 cassette?
Thanks
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Old 03-15-09, 11:27 PM
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No problem, throw a mountain 9 speed cassette on if you want...
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Old 03-15-09, 11:30 PM
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Yes, and you'll likely need to replace the chain as well. One, because it may be worn too and will skip on and/or cause the new cassette to wear prematurely. And two, because if the chain was sized as short as possible for the 12-23T cassette, it may be an inch too short for 12-25T.
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Old 03-16-09, 08:13 AM
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You could also use a 105 9-speed cassette and save some money. The Dura Ace cassette uses Ti for the few largest cogs so durability is sacrificed to achieve lower weight and you pay a premium price too.

I agree with the recommendation to get a new chain also. That's particularly important if you do go for the DA cassette and it's softer large cogs.
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Old 03-16-09, 09:37 AM
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Originally Posted by HillRider View Post
You could also use a 105 9-speed cassette and save some money.
I would be good with saving the money. I was looking at what I could find on ebay right now and some DA cassettes were a pretty good deal. Of course I can't look at the teeth before buying a used one.

I guess used is ok as long as it';s in good shape.
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Old 03-16-09, 09:45 AM
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This is something I'd buy new... I'd even venture that a new 105 cassette is a better buy than a used 7700.

Certainty has a value.

And +1 on the new chain.
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Old 03-16-09, 11:20 AM
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SRAM 9 speed cassettes also would work.
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Old 03-16-09, 11:26 AM
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Originally Posted by HillRider View Post
You could also use a 105 9-speed cassette and save some money. The Dura Ace cassette uses Ti for the few largest cogs so durability is sacrificed to achieve lower weight and you pay a premium price too.
But isn't it always the small cogs that wear out first? If so, why would the durability of the largest cogs matter? Maybe using the titanium makes the wear more even across the whole cassette.
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Old 03-16-09, 12:12 PM
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Basically any shimano compatible 9-spd cassette will work, given that the total capacity does not exceed your derailleur's capacity. A standard length RD will have 29 tooth capacity, but looks like your potentially new cassette is just fine.

I had a discussion about the cassette with my LBS, and he suggested SRAM if you want something of comparable performance/weight for cheaper.
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Old 03-16-09, 01:39 PM
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I've never experienced any excessive wear on titanium cogs but I'm not hard on equipment. YMMV.
I also agree with others that buying used cassettes is probably not a good idea.

Al
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Old 03-16-09, 02:08 PM
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AFAIK used cassette + new chain or used chain + new cassette is generally not a good idea. It's a good way to ruin them.
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Old 03-16-09, 02:27 PM
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Originally Posted by Chris_W View Post
But isn't it always the small cogs that wear out first? If so, why would the durability of the largest cogs matter? Maybe using the titanium makes the wear more even across the whole cassette.
Depends on what gears you use the most. I'm hardest on the larger cogs but I tend to be climbing quite a bit (mostly mountain bikes, too).
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