Go Back  Bike Forums > Bike Forums > Bicycle Mechanics
Reload this Page >

Learning Bike Mechanics By Overhauling a Centurion

Notices
Bicycle Mechanics Broken bottom bracket? Tacoed wheel? If you're having problems with your bicycle, or just need help fixing a flat, drop in here for the latest on bicycle mechanics & bicycle maintenance.

Learning Bike Mechanics By Overhauling a Centurion

Old 09-10-09, 04:26 PM
  #1  
erind
Newbie
Thread Starter
 
Join Date: Sep 2009
Posts: 2
Mentioned: 0 Post(s)
Tagged: 0 Thread(s)
Quoted: 0 Post(s)
Likes: 0
Liked 0 Times in 0 Posts
Learning Bike Mechanics By Overhauling a Centurion

Hi all,
Last year I bought a Centurion Le Mans 12 (1984) at my local thriftstore, specs listed here: https://www.sheldonbrown.com/centurio...s/20specs.html

I could tell it wasn't in the best of shape, a lot of rust on most everything, although the frame was mostly rust free. But hey, it was only $40 and I certainly got my monies worth riding it about town. I know nothing about bike mechanics, but would like to learn and thought it could be a fun weekend project to strip the parts off this bike, treat any rusty spots on the frame, repaint it, and build it back up from any salvageable parts but probably mostly new parts. And by 'weekend project' i mean over the course of the next 3 months kind of thing.

I know their are a lot of resources out there for bike maintenance, does anyone have any suggestions for resource(s) that approaches bike repair from a "i have a ready frame, lets build from that" point of view? Also, does this sound like too difficult a project for someone with almost no experience working on bikes?
erind is offline  
Old 09-10-09, 04:39 PM
  #2  
CACycling
Senior Member
 
Join Date: Feb 2008
Location: Oxnard, CA
Posts: 4,571

Bikes: 2009 Fuji Roubaix RC; 2011 Fuji Cross 2.0; '92 Diamond Back Ascent EX

Mentioned: 0 Post(s)
Tagged: 0 Thread(s)
Quoted: 6 Post(s)
Liked 15 Times in 12 Posts
Part of it depends on what you want to get out of it. My guess is that you could strip it, paint it, clean all the old parts and reassemble a pretty nice bike. On the other hand, you can easily spend a bunch of money on new parts and not end up with a great finished product because you don't really know what you are trying to accomplish.

I did several major overhauls on old bikes and none of them required much in the way of new parts. I would start by getting your basic tools together (crank puller, cone wrenches, allen wrenches, etc.), take lots of good, close-up photos and tear into it. Once you get the frame done, start really cleaning up all the other parts. A little elbow grease can do wonders. Then start putting it all back together (this is where the photos come in handy) and come back here to ask specific questions when you run into something you aren't sure of.
CACycling is offline  
Old 09-10-09, 05:56 PM
  #3  
Panthers007
Great State of Varmint
 
Panthers007's Avatar
 
Join Date: Sep 2008
Location: Dante's Third Ring
Posts: 7,476
Mentioned: 0 Post(s)
Tagged: 0 Thread(s)
Quoted: 1 Post(s)
Likes: 0
Liked 11 Times in 11 Posts
An outlay of quite a bit of money would be needed to buy the necessary tools - not a few of them specialized bicycle-tools - to be able to take the bike down to it's bare frame, and then reassemble it. It would be rather foolish - unless your filthy rich - to do this just for one bicycle. If you intend to go all out and take up bike-mechanics on a semi-professional base, by all means go for it!

Just as one example: You will need bicycle cable-cutters to cut cables and housing cleanly. This is a case where you can't squeak by using cheap cutters like pliers with a cutting-edge in them. And I always suggest buying ones that will last you a lifetime. If only used for it's stated purpose.
Panthers007 is offline  
Old 09-10-09, 06:42 PM
  #4  
CACycling
Senior Member
 
Join Date: Feb 2008
Location: Oxnard, CA
Posts: 4,571

Bikes: 2009 Fuji Roubaix RC; 2011 Fuji Cross 2.0; '92 Diamond Back Ascent EX

Mentioned: 0 Post(s)
Tagged: 0 Thread(s)
Quoted: 6 Post(s)
Liked 15 Times in 12 Posts
Originally Posted by Panthers007 View Post
An outlay of quite a bit of money would be needed to buy the necessary tools...
The only bike specific tools on my first rebuild was a set of cone wrenches, a crank puller and a spoke wrench (it was a PITA but I serviced the drive side bearings on the rear wheel with the freewheel in place). These cost around $25 total. Everything else was regular stuff out of my tool box. With each new project, I've picked up one or two new tools to make the job easier. Still haven't seen the need to buy a cable cutter. My diagonal cutting pliers work just fine on the cheap stuff as well as the good stuff.

Bottom line, either you are going to do your own maintenance or you are going to pay someone else to do it. I'd rather spend my money on tools instead of on labor at the LBS.
CACycling is offline  
Old 09-10-09, 06:43 PM
  #5  
CaptainCool
``````````````
 
CaptainCool's Avatar
 
Join Date: Feb 2007
Location: san jose
Posts: 763
Mentioned: 0 Post(s)
Tagged: 0 Thread(s)
Quoted: 0 Post(s)
Likes: 0
Liked 1 Time in 1 Post
Originally Posted by Panthers007 View Post
Just as one example: You will need bicycle cable-cutters to cut cables and housing cleanly. This is a case where you can't squeak by using cheap cutters like pliers with a cutting-edge in them. And I always suggest buying ones that will last you a lifetime. If only used for it's stated purpose.
I got by with wire clippers and a file. I've installed or replaced cables on three bikes so far. It does take a lot of time and patience though. The Jagwire cables that are lined with Kevlar took forever.

If you think you'll get into this, do it. I did the same thing a couple of winters ago. I converted the bike to single speed and I have commuted on it daily since then. Find some shops around you that deal in used bikes and old spare parts. Prepare to spend up to a few hundred bucks on tools and parts before you have it where you really like it.

Metric box wrench set, bottom bracket tool, crank puller, pedal wrench, spoke wrench, crescent wrench large enough for the headset, freewheel tool...
New bearings and grease, new cables and housing, tires, bar tape, maybe framesaver...
Possibly upgrade saddle/seatpost/headset/bb/crankset/brake levers if the old ones are junk or you want to upgrade.
CaptainCool is offline  
Old 09-10-09, 07:54 PM
  #6  
Panthers007
Great State of Varmint
 
Panthers007's Avatar
 
Join Date: Sep 2008
Location: Dante's Third Ring
Posts: 7,476
Mentioned: 0 Post(s)
Tagged: 0 Thread(s)
Quoted: 1 Post(s)
Likes: 0
Liked 11 Times in 11 Posts
Oh great! Have him do his build with baling-wire and duct-tape, eh? Overhauled the rear hub with the freewheel on? Why not teach him how to take off the crankset with a sledgehammer? Nuts...
Panthers007 is offline  
Old 09-10-09, 09:35 PM
  #7  
bjtesch
Senior Member
 
Join Date: Aug 2008
Location: Irving, TX
Posts: 358

Bikes: Schwinn Paramount

Mentioned: 0 Post(s)
Tagged: 0 Thread(s)
Quoted: 0 Post(s)
Likes: 0
Liked 1 Time in 1 Post
You can do pretty well with cone wrenches, freewheel puller, chain breaker, crank arm puller, allen wrenches, and bottom bracket/headset wrenches. The really specialized tools are required to install new headsets and new bottom brackets. If you are just cleaning and lubing yours, you can take them apart and put them back together with lesser tools. These are the tools that I have and I've been working on my own bikes for 30 years. I did get a new custom frame a long time ago and took it to my local shop to have the headset and bottom bracket installed.
bjtesch is offline  
Old 09-10-09, 11:20 PM
  #8  
Panthers007
Great State of Varmint
 
Panthers007's Avatar
 
Join Date: Sep 2008
Location: Dante's Third Ring
Posts: 7,476
Mentioned: 0 Post(s)
Tagged: 0 Thread(s)
Quoted: 1 Post(s)
Likes: 0
Liked 11 Times in 11 Posts
What I'm trying to get across is that "getting by" is not the goal. The goal is doing the job - any job - right.
Panthers007 is offline  
Old 09-11-09, 11:25 AM
  #9  
CaptainCool
``````````````
 
CaptainCool's Avatar
 
Join Date: Feb 2007
Location: san jose
Posts: 763
Mentioned: 0 Post(s)
Tagged: 0 Thread(s)
Quoted: 0 Post(s)
Likes: 0
Liked 1 Time in 1 Post
Originally Posted by Panthers007 View Post
Why not teach him how to take off the crankset with a sledgehammer?
If the bike has cottered cranks, I'll link him to a Sheldon Brown article that does just that.

Originally Posted by Panthers007 View Post
What I'm trying to get across is that "getting by" is not the goal. The goal is doing the job - any job - right.
The goal is to wind up with a good bike. There's nothing like having the right tool for the job, but don't get bogged down in procedure if it will keep you off the road.
CaptainCool is offline  
Old 09-11-09, 11:40 AM
  #10  
une_vitesse
Peace and bicycle grease!
 
une_vitesse's Avatar
 
Join Date: Apr 2008
Location: The Island, CA
Posts: 285

Bikes: '85 Schwinn Voyageur, Ross Mt Hood, Rossin, the Nugget

Mentioned: 0 Post(s)
Tagged: 0 Thread(s)
Quoted: 0 Post(s)
Likes: 0
Liked 0 Times in 0 Posts
Originally Posted by CaptainCool View Post
If the bike has cottered cranks, I'll link him to a Sheldon Brown article that does just that.
actually a cotter pin press is the proper tool to remove and install cotters.
une_vitesse is offline  
Old 09-11-09, 12:02 PM
  #11  
CACycling
Senior Member
 
Join Date: Feb 2008
Location: Oxnard, CA
Posts: 4,571

Bikes: 2009 Fuji Roubaix RC; 2011 Fuji Cross 2.0; '92 Diamond Back Ascent EX

Mentioned: 0 Post(s)
Tagged: 0 Thread(s)
Quoted: 6 Post(s)
Liked 15 Times in 12 Posts
Originally Posted by Panthers007 View Post
Oh great! Have him do his build with baling-wire and duct-tape, eh? Overhauled the rear hub with the freewheel on? Why not teach him how to take off the crankset with a sledgehammer? Nuts...

What I'm trying to get across is that "getting by" is not the goal. The goal is doing the job - any job - right.
There can be different means to getting the job done right. For cranks, a crank puller is really the only tool for the job and isn't a big investment. The same with cone wrenches, spoke wrench and freewheel/cassette tools.

As for my freewheel-on overhaul, I hadn't found the correct puller for my particular freewheel (early 70s Schwinn - I have one now) so I removed the axle from the NDS and had no trouble thoroughly cleaning the cups before greasing and reassembling. Probably took 10 minutes more than doing it with the freewheel off but the end result was the same either way.

Never used duct tape or bailing wire but thanks for the suggestion. Might have to add those to my growing tool box.
CACycling is offline  
Old 09-11-09, 01:16 PM
  #12  
CaptainCool
``````````````
 
CaptainCool's Avatar
 
Join Date: Feb 2007
Location: san jose
Posts: 763
Mentioned: 0 Post(s)
Tagged: 0 Thread(s)
Quoted: 0 Post(s)
Likes: 0
Liked 1 Time in 1 Post
Originally Posted by une_vitesse View Post
actually a cotter pin press is the proper tool to remove and install cotters.
Yes, but it costs $50+. A hammer works well enough to do a BB overhaul in most cases. Put that money towards a new crankset and cartridge BB.
CaptainCool is offline  
Old 09-11-09, 06:46 PM
  #13  
wrk101
Thrifty Bill
 
wrk101's Avatar
 
Join Date: Jan 2008
Location: Mountains of Western NC
Posts: 23,418

Bikes: 86 Katakura Silk, 87 Prologue X2, 88 Cimarron LE, 1975 Sekai 4000 Professional, 73 Paramount, plus more

Mentioned: 90 Post(s)
Tagged: 0 Thread(s)
Quoted: 1191 Post(s)
Liked 834 Times in 559 Posts
When you are looking to learn, I would recommend starting with a junkier bike. Go back to that thrift store where you scored the Centurion, or garage sales, or whatever. Tear down the junker, rebuild it, and donate it back to your favorite charity. Make mistakes on the junker, rather than on your nice Centurion.

+1 Wrenching on bikes does take a handful of pretty nice bike specific tools: chain breaker, crank puller, cone wrenches, bottom bracket wrench and a good cable cutter. And unfortunately, many parts on a bike are not standardized (like freewheels). So sometimes, it's cheaper to take the bike to a shop and pay them $5 to remove a part for you. But if you plan to continue doing bike work, the investment in good tools is well worth it!

I would be careful about doing anything with the frame paint wise. Any abrasive like steel wool will do irreversible damage. Do a search on rust and learn more on this topic.

This job should not take 3 months of weekends. You should be able to do it in a weekend or two, and with practice, less than one day.

I put less than one full day into my Centurion Lemans 12 build, which started with a $20 C/L frame set.




You can do it!!

Last edited by wrk101; 09-11-09 at 06:51 PM.
wrk101 is offline  
Old 09-11-09, 07:47 PM
  #14  
takingcontrol
Mass Mover
 
takingcontrol's Avatar
 
Join Date: Apr 2009
Location: Independence OR
Posts: 303

Bikes: KHS XXL

Mentioned: 0 Post(s)
Tagged: 0 Thread(s)
Quoted: 0 Post(s)
Likes: 0
Liked 1 Time in 1 Post
I'm starting my first rebuild myself, The only tool I have bought is a wrench for the headset. I just used a small punch to remove the chain with no damage and the pin still in place to put back together. I may buy a crank puller but I'm not sure yet as one of the LBS was telling me that you need many different crank pullers for different bikes. ( not sure how much use it would get). May just switch it to a cartridge at the LBS.
takingcontrol is offline  
Old 09-11-09, 08:18 PM
  #15  
CACycling
Senior Member
 
Join Date: Feb 2008
Location: Oxnard, CA
Posts: 4,571

Bikes: 2009 Fuji Roubaix RC; 2011 Fuji Cross 2.0; '92 Diamond Back Ascent EX

Mentioned: 0 Post(s)
Tagged: 0 Thread(s)
Quoted: 6 Post(s)
Liked 15 Times in 12 Posts
Originally Posted by takingcontrol View Post
I may buy a crank puller but I'm not sure yet as one of the LBS was telling me that you need many different crank pullers for different bikes. ( not sure how much use it would get). May just switch it to a cartridge at the LBS.
Crank puller is pretty much universal for 3 peice BBs. Cartridge or cup and cone, the cranks have to come off before dealing with the BB.
CACycling is offline  
Old 09-11-09, 08:30 PM
  #16  
erind
Newbie
Thread Starter
 
Join Date: Sep 2009
Posts: 2
Mentioned: 0 Post(s)
Tagged: 0 Thread(s)
Quoted: 0 Post(s)
Likes: 0
Liked 0 Times in 0 Posts
Thanks for your responses everyone. I enjoyed reading the different perspectives. I'm not too uptight about getting everything perfect, I just want to familiarize myself with my bike and know its safe to ride and in good working order. I'm happy to drop some cash on tools that I will be able to use on future projects and maintenance, but if it seems like there is a likelihood that I'll need to buy tools I will have little future use for. I'm hoping in those situations to take advantage of the 'bike church' co-op in town where anyone can come in, and I believe, pay a donation or some small fee to use any of their tools to work on your bike. There are also 'ministers' there I'm told who can assist you in fixing your bike.
erind is offline  
Old 09-12-09, 06:26 PM
  #17  
bjtesch
Senior Member
 
Join Date: Aug 2008
Location: Irving, TX
Posts: 358

Bikes: Schwinn Paramount

Mentioned: 0 Post(s)
Tagged: 0 Thread(s)
Quoted: 0 Post(s)
Likes: 0
Liked 1 Time in 1 Post
The bottom bracket and headset take the more expensive tools, but this procedure doesn't have to be done very often. If you can get someone to help you with lubing the bottom bracket and headset then it doesn't take many tools to maintain the rest of the bike, and the tools you buy for that will be inexpensive and will be used more frequently.
bjtesch is offline  
Old 09-12-09, 09:03 PM
  #18  
CACycling
Senior Member
 
Join Date: Feb 2008
Location: Oxnard, CA
Posts: 4,571

Bikes: 2009 Fuji Roubaix RC; 2011 Fuji Cross 2.0; '92 Diamond Back Ascent EX

Mentioned: 0 Post(s)
Tagged: 0 Thread(s)
Quoted: 6 Post(s)
Liked 15 Times in 12 Posts
Originally Posted by bjtesch View Post
The bottom bracket and headset take the more expensive tools, but this procedure doesn't have to be done very often. If you can get someone to help you with lubing the bottom bracket and headset then it doesn't take many tools to maintain the rest of the bike, and the tools you buy for that will be inexpensive and will be used more frequently.
The tools for removing/installing cartridge BBS aren't very expensive. For cup and cone BBs, I've never used any specialty tools once the cranks are off. And I've never used specialty tools on headsets (not even sure what they would be - I guess ignorance is bliss).
CACycling is offline  
Old 09-12-09, 09:38 PM
  #19  
nymtber
Senior Member
 
Join Date: Mar 2005
Location: NY state
Posts: 1,311

Bikes: See Signature...

Mentioned: 0 Post(s)
Tagged: 0 Thread(s)
Quoted: 9 Post(s)
Likes: 0
Liked 0 Times in 0 Posts
Panthers007 DOES have a point about having the right tools and good quality tools. However, most of us cant justify $500 in tools to be home mechanics. I have about $150 in tools and I have rebuilt 4-5 bikes now. Just built up a mtb for my brother, and its probably put together better than *most* bike shops around here.

I totally rebuilt an old Schwinn Woodlands mountain bike 2 years ago, rattle can paint job and all (it looks decent actually). Except for the paint job, it looks as it would have when it rolled out of the schwinn dealer back in the 80's, except is likely better lubed. I do have quite a few tools though. I need a headset cup press, and a cup remover. I paid $30 for the woodlands, about $15 worth of cables (stainless) from the bike shop, $7 foam grips, $7 kmc chain, $30 for planet bike full fenders with mudflaps. $90 total for a nice little run around town bike that I really dont need to worry about being stolen, its not flashy but is fun to ride. But, the bike had good wheels, good derailleurs, good shifters, and mint condition tires and tubes (they had been replaced recently) I probably only paid what the guy had into tires and tubes for the bike

as long as you have good components on the bike, get the tools you need to do the job, and have fun. Find out what special tools you need, and get them BEFORE you start. Most shops around here carry all the Park tools one needs for such work.

You will learn a lot and have fun doing it, and hopefully have a nice bike in the end that you dont have a lot of money into.

Channel-lock pliers are sometimes better for the older bottom brackets and headsets if they are stuck any...however if used improperly can also cause irreversible damage to parts.

Last edited by nymtber; 09-12-09 at 09:43 PM.
nymtber is offline  
Old 09-12-09, 10:32 PM
  #20  
EastBiker
Dis Member
 
Join Date: Oct 2006
Posts: 155
Mentioned: 0 Post(s)
Tagged: 0 Thread(s)
Quoted: 0 Post(s)
Likes: 0
Liked 0 Times in 0 Posts
Originally Posted by Panthers007 View Post
What I'm trying to get across is that "getting by" is not the goal. The goal is doing the job - any job - right.
Don't get so stuck up dude. OP is trying to learn a few skills, not opening a bike shop outright. The example you gave about cutting cables, yes cable cutters are essential but if he has a dremel tool that would work very nicely too.
EastBiker is offline  
Old 09-12-09, 11:04 PM
  #21  
Panthers007
Great State of Varmint
 
Panthers007's Avatar
 
Join Date: Sep 2008
Location: Dante's Third Ring
Posts: 7,476
Mentioned: 0 Post(s)
Tagged: 0 Thread(s)
Quoted: 1 Post(s)
Likes: 0
Liked 11 Times in 11 Posts
I'm not suggesting you need to buy a headset-press or a facer for your bottom-bracket shell. These are operations I wouldn't recommend you to even try without some face-to-face instruction from a bike-mechanic. But if you complain about spending $14 for a good crank-puller such as the Park Tool CWP-7, or dropping $40 for the best cable-cutters available - which will last a lifetime - then rather than playing with frayed cables and a ruined bottom-bracket, take it to a bike shop. $150 is, to many folks, a considerable chunk of money. But that $150 should take care of a basic list of good tools that won't fall apart on you. SEARS Craftsman double-ended metric-wrenches are fine for use. You don't need to buy the Park Tool name($$$) for these or screwdrivers, etc.

We just had another thread here where the OP wanted the way to take off his crankset without spending $14 for a lousy crank-puller (actually the CWP-7 is a very good one). His plan was to do this "some other way" come Hell or High-Water.

It's very frustrating for someone who is a good bike-mechanic that is trying to teach someone who asked for the truth - but didn't like it and refused to listen. Going from person-to-person to find a different answer to his question. Got it? Good.

I think it's great you want to do your own wrenching. And I do know what's involved regarding which tools will serve you best (no Harbor-Fright) to accomplish your task without being as likely to break or mar your bicycle. The best tools are the one's you only have to buy once.


Best cable-cutters:



If you want to go Dremel, help yourself. But I find these (I bought 'em in 1984) are more convenient.
Panthers007 is offline  
Old 09-13-09, 12:41 AM
  #22  
rjn3100
Senior Member
 
Join Date: Jul 2009
Location: Chicago
Posts: 81

Bikes: '77 Raleigh Competition GS '95 Fuji Ace

Mentioned: 0 Post(s)
Tagged: 0 Thread(s)
Quoted: 0 Post(s)
Likes: 0
Liked 0 Times in 0 Posts
Panther, I've read some of your post, you seem to know what your talking about (more than I do on bicycles), but IMO you come off as a tool snob sometimes. This has turned into a little bit of a tool discusion, so I wanted to say a few things. it seems to me there are a few alternatives to buying high end tools just to "see" if your going to do this as a hobby I agree you cant take a crank off with a pry bar and a hammer, the proper tool for the job.
For instance I have gotten a few spin doctor tools from performance, on sale. They don't seem too bad, and if you watch the sales you can get them cheap.
Parks is nice stuff, but it's kinda like the snap on vs stanley arguement.
I also like "sears" (not craftsman) brand wrenches, not a nice finish but cheap, and I have never broke one, they fit the nut or bolt well.
I've used tools to earn a living my whole life and came up with this thought:
If I have something special (maybe one or two times) I will buy the cheapest tool I can get away with, If I use that tool more than once and break or wear it out, THEN I will buy something high end.
This could easily apply to bicycles. If you do something 2-3 times a year you dont need high end tools. If you wear out the inexpensive stuff, THEN you are useing it enough (making money) to buy the good stuff.
And yes I own snap on, craftsman, sears, and tools sold by harbour freight. My cone/headset/BB wrenches are marked AID, they looked cheap to me when I got them but lasted 10 years of casual riding, and 10 years of sitting in a drawer, now that I'm doing more rideing and wrenching, when those wear out or break, I will spend money on good stuff
Just my 2 cents
rjn3100 is offline  
Old 09-13-09, 01:23 AM
  #23  
Panthers007
Great State of Varmint
 
Panthers007's Avatar
 
Join Date: Sep 2008
Location: Dante's Third Ring
Posts: 7,476
Mentioned: 0 Post(s)
Tagged: 0 Thread(s)
Quoted: 1 Post(s)
Likes: 0
Liked 11 Times in 11 Posts
Why did you jump to the conclusion that I don't like Spin Doctor tools? From what I have seen, they are competent and are likely to hold up for occasional use in the home/garage/basement. If you were to buy Park Tools and found you were all thumbs and hated bike-mechanics - Park Tools have a very good re-sale value.

Park brand tools are not the top-flight tier of tools out there - FYI. A true "tool snob" would be laden down with Campagnolo tools made in Italy that may appear crude by way of comparison - but they say 'CAMPAGNOLO' on them and cost twice as much money.

So what is being given to one of us around 20 mechanics loose in these forums, on our own time, that are here to assist is: No thanks. We'll figure it out on our lonesome. We don't want you snobs ruining our fun of guess what to do to our new $400 to $4,000 bicycle. Here's MY take:

As is the abject failure of our public school systems - by the time you hit junior high, you had begun to equate education with pain. If you asked a question of a teacher (it only takes one rotten one to do this to kids), you become accustomed to being told you are stupid for not knowing the answer. In reality that rotten teacher didn't know the answer and rather than saying: "Geeze! I don't know. Let's find out!" - that twerp told you in front of the class that you were an idiot for not knowing and deflected their shortcomings outward to you. The Student.

By the time you graduated, a Teacher = Emotional Pain. The red-light goes off in your skulls and you avoid such in the future. Teachers become the enemy. This is a perfectly normal response to such a situation. I see this all the time. Now that we're adults here, may I suggest un-learning this lesson taught by a couple of miscreants? Cynicism is natural upon exposure, but people can learn to move on and embrace education again.

By the by - I took over teaching the chemistry classes at my (private) high-school when I was 16. I've been teaching for most of my life in a variety of subjects. The public-school told my parents that I was "special-needs" and tried to send me to a "special school." They said this when I was 12 and living in the research libraries at Harvard and MIT.

So I'll try to not sound like a "tool snob" if you'll agree to examine your own attitude towards teachers from when you were growing up. Okay?

Learning really can be fun!

Last edited by Panthers007; 09-13-09 at 01:32 AM.
Panthers007 is offline  
Old 09-13-09, 07:34 AM
  #24  
nymtber
Senior Member
 
Join Date: Mar 2005
Location: NY state
Posts: 1,311

Bikes: See Signature...

Mentioned: 0 Post(s)
Tagged: 0 Thread(s)
Quoted: 9 Post(s)
Likes: 0
Liked 0 Times in 0 Posts
my brother and I overhauled an old schwinn roadbike back in 2001ish I believe. The ONLY specialized tools we had were crank puller and chain tool (real hard to get chain off without one). Big crescent wrenches, channel lock pliers, and normal everyday tools were all we seemed to need. Yes, it WOULD have been easier with proper tools, but they were not necessary, on that age of bike.


Panthers007. Your "teaching" as you call it is worse than what I experienced in public school. Instead of instilling positive, your threads are negative, right from being the second reply to the OP. I bought a whole tool kit for my first built for $45 and most of those cheap kits come with all the tools needed for especially older bikes. Seems I have rebuilt many bikes with only a few other special tools, such as real cone wrenches and a freewheel tool for the older bikes. I was a poor college student, and certainly not "filthy rich" as you require in your first post, yet I was able to completely disassemble a bike, short of removing headset cups as it was being re-used, for only $45 in tools. I wish I had a cable cutter back then, but my dremel seemed to work fine as did wire cutters for the brake housing. Try being a positive teacher rather than a naysayer.

erind: I DO recommend purchasing one of the $40-60 tool kits. Search around online for one, performancebike.com is a good place to start. Double check the kit has the tools you need, though most do not have a freewheel tool for whatever reasons. Park's freewheel removal tool is about $5-6, and worth every penny. A cable cutter IS a good idea, but if your handy with a dremel or maybe a pneumatic cut off tool, you could get by with that for now.
nymtber is offline  
Old 09-13-09, 09:52 AM
  #25  
DMF 
Elitist Troglodyte
 
DMF's Avatar
 
Join Date: Jun 2006
Location: Dallas
Posts: 6,924

Bikes: 03 Raleigh Professional (steel)

Mentioned: 0 Post(s)
Tagged: 0 Thread(s)
Quoted: 1 Post(s)
Likes: 0
Liked 1 Time in 1 Post
though most do not have a freewheel tool for whatever reasons.
That's because there are at least eight different ones available, and more unavailable...

I too recommend a cheap tool kit to get started. But I also agree with Panthers007. There are some tools that you really need a good one. A cable and/or housing cutter is one such. It might also be worth it to invest in a derailleur hanger gage, too.

erind: No, I don't know of any videos that specifically relate to a new build. But you shouldn't be doing that to start anyway. Do a tear-down refurb re-assemble, possibly in increments. (See the PLEASE READ THIS thread at the top of the forum for some links.)

And have something to ride while you do. There inevitably will be hangups.
__________________
Stupidity got us into this mess - why can't it get us out?

- Will Rogers
DMF is offline  

Posting Rules
You may not post new threads
You may not post replies
You may not post attachments
You may not edit your posts

BB code is On
Smilies are On
[IMG] code is On
HTML code is Off


Thread Tools
Search this Thread

Contact Us - Archive - Advertising - Cookie Policy - Privacy Statement - Terms of Service - Do Not Sell or Share My Personal Information -

Copyright © 2023 MH Sub I, LLC dba Internet Brands. All rights reserved. Use of this site indicates your consent to the Terms of Use.