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3 Speed 26 x 1 3/8 Studded Tires - Options?

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3 Speed 26 x 1 3/8 Studded Tires - Options?

Old 12-06-09, 02:09 PM
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Sir Lunch-a-lot
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3 Speed 26 x 1 3/8 Studded Tires - Options?

Hello. I have a 3 speed bicycle with 26 x 1 3/8 tires, and I have been riding a fair bit as of late. We have had a pretty mild winter so far, but now the snow has finally come, and I am looking to increase the overall traction I have while riding on ice and snow. Now, I have spent way too much time searching the internet and have been unable to find any sort of studded tires that are this size. Furthermore, I have so far been unable to find knobby tires of this size either. Most tutorials/documents explaining how to make studded tires assume that you have knobbies on your tires to hold/support any sort of stud. However, the only tires I seem to be able to find do not have knobbies.

Is it possible to create studded tires out of what are essentially slicks? Is there anything a person has to do to prevent the studs from coming out?

Is it possible to use a different size of tire on these rims? Based on what I have been reading on Sheldon Browns website, it doesn't look promising seeing as how there are not many (if any) tires that have the same/similar bead size. The guy at a bikeshop I went to a week or so ago seemed to think that you could put another tire size on (I don't know what size he was quoting... something with a decimal instead of a fraction).

I have also found a couple of tutorials regarding creating tire chains for the bicycle wheels. Has anybody had experience with this?

The only other thing I can think of is maybe to find an old rim somewhere that I can get a studded tire for and use that up front for winter.

Anyway, I would greatly appreciate any input you guys would have.

Thanks.
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Old 12-06-09, 02:36 PM
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Check diy studded bicycle tires on Google.
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Old 12-06-09, 02:39 PM
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Or you can look right here in our winter cycling forum... https://www.bikeforums.net/showthread...-Studded-Tyres

You can stud the 26 by 1 3/8 tyres just as you can stud any slick tyre.
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Old 12-06-09, 06:03 PM
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DIY is probably your best option. For the record, you can not put a different sized tire on that rim, but you may be able to fit a different rim on that bike. It would be expensive, but would afford you a wider range of tires.
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Old 12-06-09, 06:27 PM
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Originally Posted by fuzz2050 View Post
DIY is probably your best option. For the record, you can not put a different sized tire on that rim, but you may be able to fit a different rim on that bike. It would be expensive, but would afford you a wider range of tires.
There are two different "26 x 1 3/8" (op doesn't mention which, sigh).
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Old 12-06-09, 06:55 PM
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If the OP is running a bike with 26 by 1 3/8 tyres he is probably riding a Raleigh or older CCM... or perhaps one of many foreign bikes that used the same wheel / tyre standard.

There are not a lot of options out there for these tyres as the days when these were common are long past but the tyres for these tend to be pretty inexpensive unless you buy a Schwalbe Marathon for around 75.00 per tyre.
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Old 12-06-09, 07:25 PM
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I'd be concerned about stopping a steel-rimmed bike in snowy conditions, those rims are slippery when wet!
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Old 12-06-09, 07:44 PM
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Originally Posted by Sixty Fiver View Post
Or you can look right here in our winter cycling forum... https://www.bikeforums.net/showthread...-Studded-Tyres

You can stud the 26 by 1 3/8 tyres just as you can stud any slick tyre.
Sixty Fiver, have you considered turning the linked thread into an Instructable? I'm sure there are many who would be interested.
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Old 12-08-09, 10:10 PM
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Thanks for the replies. My biggest concern had been that the thinner walls of slycks (sp?) would be unable to support the studs. I actually built a set of studded tires using pop rivets and washers. They seem to work well, but in hindsight it seems that I could have put the studs further apart... as it is, they are a bit too close to the center of the tire, but could be positioned a bit further on the outer edge so that they would not be in contact with the road while vertical. Ah well. They'll probably wear fast, but it should work great if I stick mostly to snow packed roads.

Hey, another question for you guys. If and when these studs are removed (such as when they wear down), is it safe to just leave the little holes in the tire and make new ones to move the studs further apart? Would some sort of tire liner compensate for the holes/would a tire liner be necessary? Not that I am planning on removing the studs at this time. Just something I'm wondering about for the future.
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Old 12-08-09, 10:29 PM
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Originally Posted by gerv View Post
Sixty Fiver, have you considered turning the linked thread into an Instructable? I'm sure there are many who would be interested.
We have a well produced video on winter cycling that was done about a decade ago and if we were able to convert this to a digital format it would work really well for that... with current technology we could also looking at doing another demo that could be posted here, there,and everywhere.

This might be a good project for the new year.
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Old 12-09-09, 06:24 AM
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That is an obsolute size and your selection for the five ninetey something bead diameter you have is limited. Since it is a 3 I suspect it is a Raleigh or Schwinn, and those 26x 1 3/8 might be close enough to accomodate the couple of mm bead diameter difference or the OLD Schwinn cruiser diameter, but the mountain bike 26s and 650Cs are a much smaller diameter and are not interchangeable.

How about a Tuffy Liner between the tube and the tire to protect the tube from the stud?

A mountain bike rim won't be interchangeable with rim brakes if that is what you have on your biike.
You might be able to get a hub with coaster or drum and a mountain bike rim and remove or back off caliper brakes out for the winter.
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Old 12-09-09, 09:41 AM
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Originally Posted by Sir Lunch-a-lot View Post
.. I actually built a set of studded tires using pop rivets and washers. They seem to work well, but in hindsight it seems that I could have put the studs further apart... as it is, they are a bit too close to the center of the tire, but could be positioned a bit further on the outer edge so that they would not be in contact with the road while vertical.
You don't want that. Stopping a slide that's already happening is a tougher task than preventing one from occurring in the first place. If you need studs, then you want them in contact with the ground from the start. Having studs that would only make contact "when needed" is a wonderful but flawed theory. Schwalbe has tire that's built like that and it's really unnerving to ride. In the rear, the studs will lift out of the ice during braking. At the front, the studs can lift out if your center of gravity shifts to the rear while honking up a hill. The "solution" suggested by Schwalbe is to run the pressure so low that the studs remain in contact all the time, which is bad news for a commuter bike.
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Old 12-12-09, 05:47 AM
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Originally Posted by dabac View Post
You don't want that. Stopping a slide that's already happening is a tougher task than preventing one from occurring in the first place. If you need studs, then you want them in contact with the ground from the start. Having studs that would only make contact "when needed" is a wonderful but flawed theory. Schwalbe has tire that's built like that and it's really unnerving to ride. In the rear, the studs will lift out of the ice during braking. At the front, the studs can lift out if your center of gravity shifts to the rear while honking up a hill. The "solution" suggested by Schwalbe is to run the pressure so low that the studs remain in contact all the time, which is bad news for a commuter bike.
Lunch a lot's approach can be right for the appropriate conditions.
In the environ I ride having studs on the sides is the best approach. Ice is not the norm but patches exist. The studs dig in when you start to slide slightly but when the bike is vertical the studless center hits the pavement. Farther north it wouldn't be the correct approach but the 102-110 stud tires that have a studless center are the best for the DC area.
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Old 12-12-09, 06:57 AM
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I had the same problem as the OP when I was in love with my three speed. The tire selection is limited. As at least one other member posted above, you also have the Schwinn vs non-Schwinn size issue of the rim.

The best solution is the either make your own studded tires OR, switch to a mountain bike for winter riding. There are plenty of made-in-China aluminum clunkers available almost free today either from yard sales, junk piles, or new from the Big Box Dept stores. If you haven't figured it out already, winter bicycling means sacrificing the bike to the road-salt Gods. The Aluminum cheap-0 bikes are the perfect thing for that.

IF you three-speed just happens to have a kick-back brake on the rear hub, you can make your own poor-man's ice chaines. Just take baling wire and wrap it around your tire and rim. Of course, if you use caliper brakes, you can't use chains.

If you have to pick one wheel to be studded or chained, pick the front wheel. It is easier to control a rear spin-out than it is to control the front end sliding.
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Old 12-12-09, 11:27 AM
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What about this one could be good enough for winther, and its avaible in 26x1 3/8
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Old 12-12-09, 11:40 AM
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Originally Posted by Kriller View Post
What about this one could be good enough for winther, and its avaible in 26x1 3/8
Where can I get a set of those?
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Old 12-12-09, 12:09 PM
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that looks like a regular road tyre. It would fill up with snowy ice immediately.

need a more open tread pattern.
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Old 12-12-09, 02:01 PM
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Here's a 26 x 1 3/8 knobby tire from Kenda available on Amazon for $6.99. These might make good candidates for DIY studs.
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Old 12-12-09, 08:19 PM
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Kenda K812, knobby, 26 x 1 3/8 (ISO590).

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Old 12-30-11, 12:26 PM
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I recently bought a pair of those Kenda's from Amazon with plans to stud them. I was planning on using this method: https://www.bikeforums.net/showthread...n-7-easy-steps

I am hopeful. I'm riding an old Sears and Roebuck 3 speed that I picked up out of the trash pile with intentions of having a winter bike. I rode today on those tires (not yet studded) and whoa, nelly.. I need studs!
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Old 12-30-11, 12:43 PM
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You can make chains too, 2 loops of brake cable, joined by sections
of some sort of thin, steel [dog-collar?] chain.

+ really like drum Brakes on my ice and snow bike.. highly recommended.
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