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best type of lube for caliper brake pivots?

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best type of lube for caliper brake pivots?

Old 01-25-10, 10:18 AM
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best type of lube for caliper brake pivots?

So I'm mostly-overhauling one of my bikes after a 120-mile ride in rain and grit, and putting some long overdue leaning into the rear brake.
The brake is a single-pivot sidepull brake, with miniture ball-bearings in the pivot (not just a bushing). And the pivot was pretty grind-y and stick-y.

I poured solvent over the pivot from different angles while manually pinching the calipers closed and letting them open again, which got the pivot working smoothly again. Let solvent dry, flushed the pivot out with water to clean out residue, and then let the water dry.

So my actual question is, what is the best sort of lube for the pivots in caliper brakes? In the past I've used light "dry" chain lube (e.g., Pro-Link).
But this time I was curious to see if there is any accepted best lubricant for this place. And couldn't find any threads about this with search, so figured I'd start one.
Odds are any light oil that's thin enough to drip into the pivot area (and then wipe excess off the exterior) will be fine. But maybe there are actual reasons to use one sort of lube over others.
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Old 01-25-10, 10:26 AM
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I use "dry wax" type lubrication from Finish Line.
It seems to attract less dirt, plus the light suspension fluid theyuse seems to help it penetrate well into joints and pivots as you find on components like brake calipers and derailleurs. The good penetrating nature of the lubricant makes it that you do not have to dissasembe these components to lubricate them adequately. Seems to work well too with cables and their casings.

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Old 01-25-10, 10:28 AM
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grease would be the longest lasting. a thicker type oil should last a bit too
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Old 01-25-10, 10:28 AM
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This is a pretty lightly loaded bearing so any decent light oil will suffice. The oil should be thick enough to stay in place. What's most important is that you use something that doesn't thicken or get gummy over time making the action uneven. Wipe off the excess so that it doesn't attract dust.
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Old 01-25-10, 10:49 AM
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My vote is for grease. I just dis-assembled, cleaned, lubed & re-assembled some nice, used Dura Ace 7403 dual pivot calipers that I got used off ebay. They were pretty dirty and it was actually kind of fun tearing them down to examining all the small parts. These use 2 miniature ball bearing pivots at each of the dual pivots. I used Rock-N-Roll "Super Web grease" that I squirted on with a little Finish Line brand micro grease gun (the kind that screws onto a 4 ounce grease tube). After cleaning the ball bearing bushing with WD-40 and wiping clean with paper towels, I put some of the grease on all the surfaces and then snugged the pivot bolts onto the brake arm and the middle dual pivot arm. My goal was to snug everything up as much as possible with no side play but not lose the buttery free movement. I put blue Loctite on the nut for the central and side pivot threads before tightening these nuts down. Just wipe of any excess grease squeeze out and you're good to go. The feel (modulation) of these brakes with the new cartridge pads I'm using seems excellent. The grease was also applied to the brake quick release and it seems to hold its position just fine while having buttery action there too.

To repeat: Go with grease!
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Old 01-25-10, 11:59 AM
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A thicker oil (e.g., Phil Tenacious Oil, or Chain-L chain lube) might be the easiest - will go into place via capillary action, can wipe off excess, and no need to disassemble.

I've disassembled and overhauled used brakes before, which was fun (and a trip) but it's a fair bit of time.
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Old 01-25-10, 12:07 PM
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Those must be some high zoot calipers if they are using ball bearings instead of bushings.

You'll get the best long term protection from grease or a little thick oil. But if the bearings are so exposed that you can hose them out as easily as you're saying then a dry film lube may well prove to be better as it'll be less likely to hold grit in the bearing. Without seeing the way the pivot is made and how well sealed or shielded it is it's hard to say what is the best method.
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Old 01-25-10, 12:11 PM
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Grease is a great way to go IMO. Something water proof...
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Old 01-25-10, 12:18 PM
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Another vote for Phil's Tenacious. It'll work its way in, and you just wipe off the excess.
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Old 01-25-10, 12:22 PM
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Originally Posted by BCRider View Post
Those must be some high zoot calipers if they are using ball bearings instead of bushings.

Without seeing the way the pivot is made and how well sealed or shielded it is it's hard to say what is the best method.
The caliper in the picture appears to be an Ultegra 6403 dual pivot, the same basic design as the 7403's except the caliper arms are painted instead of polished and clear coated. The little ball bearing bushings have a stainless steel flat washer on each side to make a sort of sandwich, that when installed correctly nestles into the caliper recesses pretty well. So it does get some protection against the elements. In fact, using grease on these tiny ball bearings gives the user some peace of mind at disassembly time because the goop from the grease will contain those tiny balls as you set them out on a pan to clean.
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Old 01-25-10, 12:27 PM
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I find a graphite grease works well. Over the years, after the oily part dries out, the graphite remains to provide some residual lubrication.
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Old 01-25-10, 12:39 PM
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I got the impression that the brake in that photo are not the ball bearing ones he's talking about. At least I sure don't see the bearings in the picture. And the one in the picture looks to me like a dual pivot style instead of the single pivot he says he's working on.

Interesting what you say about the bearings though. It sounds like thrust bearings instead of axial bearings. But that makes sense since it would better support the loads from the friction of the pads and make for some slick feeling brakes at the same time.

If I had brakes with ball thrust races in them I'd be paranoid about riding them in sloppy conditions without good fenders. Otherwise I'd go nutz listening to them screaming for mercy in the water and mud....
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Old 01-25-10, 01:43 PM
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the brakes in the photo are indeed not the ones I'm talking about. The brakes in the photo are early-90's Shimano 600, the same design as the Dura-Ace that masi61 overhauled.
the brakes I'm overhauling here are single-pivot sidepulls, late-80's Shimano 105 (BR-1050). They also have a similar ball-bearing setup at the pivot, though. In the pic above, the ball-bearings are in the upper left, held in place by a plastic retainer (there's no actual "race" beyond them just rolling sandwiched between washers as masi61 described.



I don't feel like disassembling the brakes this time around, so I'm just going with Phil Tenacious Oil. drip into place, let capillary action do its thing, wipe off the excess. The oil is thick enough to stay in place for length of time, though not quite as well as grease. But as FBinNY said, the brake doesn't have much in the way of bearing load, and it's the rear brake which I use less anyway (although it definitely gets more crud in it because the front brake is protected by the fork).
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Old 01-25-10, 02:42 PM
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I still vote for the dry type "wax" lubricants, as long as you apply them regularly, you should have good protection from wear. The problem with grease is it picks up dirt real easy as in the brake pivots where wheels throw up the grit constantly agains it. Grease laden with dirt and grit just ends up wearing out your parts. Same reason I use the dry "wax" type lubricants on the chain of my bikes and motorcycles. My chains stay cleaner longer and do not wear out as quick. JMOs

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Old 01-25-10, 02:51 PM
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Originally Posted by Chombi View Post
I still vote for the dry type "wax" lubricants, as long as you apply them regularly, you should have good protection from wear. The problem with grease is it picks up dirt real easy as in the brake pivots where wheels throw up the grit constantly agains it. Grease laden with dirt and grit just ends up wearing out your parts. Same reason I use the dry "wax" type lubricants on the chain of my bikes and motorcycles. My chains stay cleaner longer and do not wear out as quick. JMOs

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The problem with dry or wax lubes for this applicarion is that they don't offer enough weather protection. Sprayed water will wick in and cause rust problems unless the ball bearing is stainless. The key is an oil or grease that will stay put and provide an effective water barrier. The actual lubrication requirement is very low.
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Old 01-25-10, 02:57 PM
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I've never found wax lubes to be impressive - the required frequency of usage defeats the value in my book.
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Old 01-25-10, 04:00 PM
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Consider using a grease with a lot of Moly in it. Like DuPont assembly lube, or Honda Moly 60.

Moly is unique, in that it continues to lubricate, even if dry.
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Old 01-26-10, 12:36 AM
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Tri-Flow Teflon works well. Or Finish Line Teflon. Just apply it every other week. Phil Wood works longer. Wax-lube I reserve for chains.

Anywho - take your pick.
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Old 01-26-10, 12:44 AM
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If the bearings are exposed enough to allow penetration by water and dirt a heavier grease would not be suitable as that would serve as a trap for contaminants.

A light to medium weight oil that would flush and lubricate at the same time would be what the doctor ordered.

The home brew lube I use for chains also works really well for small interfaces such as this... it is a mix of 10:30 synthetic and wd40 in a 1:3 mix.
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Old 01-26-10, 12:57 AM
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I use the same lube for chain, derailleur pivots, cable stops, pulleys, brake pivot and the cables that run under the BB. Heck in fact I use the same lube for every lubrication needs for the bike. What's this lube I use? Why it's just my homebrew 3 units OMS and 1 unit dino oil. Works great so far.
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Old 01-26-10, 01:21 AM
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3iker - we seem to have the same approach.

Working in the industry I have seen so many products that make fabulous claims but a simple mix of oil and mineral spirits has been the best all around lubricant from a cost and performance basis.

The bicycle lubrication business is a big scam where people pay highly inflated amounts for products they can get more cheaply at their local hardware or auto supply. I use synthetic marine grease or industrial grade lubricants for bearings which costs far less than Park or Phil's which are just repackaged grease.

I use WD40 because I get it at cost and it is right at hand... on it's own it's 10% oil content is insufficient to provide lasting lubrication but when you boost that to 30% + it works wonderfully.

This has been our "secret" recipe at the co-op for a decade.
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Old 01-26-10, 09:20 AM
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Originally Posted by Sixty Fiver View Post
3iker - we seem to have the same approach.

Working in the industry I have seen so many products that make fabulous claims but a simple mix of oil and mineral spirits has been the best all around lubricant from a cost and performance basis.

The bicycle lubrication business is a big scam where people pay highly inflated amounts for products they can get more cheaply at their local hardware or auto supply. I use synthetic marine grease or industrial grade lubricants for bearings which costs far less than Park or Phil's which are just repackaged grease.

I use WD40 because I get it at cost and it is right at hand... on it's own it's 10% oil content is insufficient to provide lasting lubrication but when you boost that to 30% + it works wonderfully.

This has been our "secret" recipe at the co-op for a decade.
WD-40 is also very toxic when aerosoled. Read the material safety sheet anytime recently? Degreaser that you use? Bike wash? Threadlocker? Grease? We've seriously cut down on using chemicals whenever possible when wrenching at our shop - stuff like WD-40, silcone polish, solvent parts tank etc. Nitrile gloves when we do have to use them or the proper hand/breathing protection. There is no point risking exposure to these chemicals on a bike mecahnics (service manager even) wage if not necessary. It's not worth it.

Most shops I go into or have worked at have a fairly lacksy-daisy attitude towards this - gloves? HTFU! Breathing mask/goggles/clothing protection at the parts washer? HTFU!

Mmm, yeah no thanks.

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Old 01-26-10, 09:43 AM
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Originally Posted by operator View Post
WD-40 is also very toxic when aerosoled. Read the material safety sheet anytime recently? Degreaser that you use? Bike wash? Threadlocker? Grease? We've seriously cut down on using chemicals whenever possible when wrenching at our shop - stuff like WD-40, silcone polish, solvent parts tank etc. Nitrile gloves when we do have to use them or the proper hand/breathing protection. There is no point risking exposure to these chemicals on a bike mecahnics (service manager even) wage if not necessary. It's not worth it.

Most shops I go into or have worked at have a fairly lacksy-daisy attitude towards this - gloves? HTFU! Breathing mask/goggles/clothing protection at the parts washer? HTFU!

Mmm, yeah no thanks.
I use organic degreasers and simple green for cleaning, and avoid direct contact with petroleum solvents, and my little mix of home brew goes in a bottle... I won't use WD40 in canned / aerosol form.

Can't stand Varsol and don't know why folks will use gasoline or kerosene for cleanup as the extra speed isn't worth the risks of prolonged contact exposure.

Varsol still gets used a lot in machining as despite the fact there are better and safer coolants it is really cheap... breathing it in all day is also really bad for your health. When you work on cast iron regular coolants aren't as effective and because of the heat created the varsol vapourizes... when I did this kind of work I insisted on having a quality respirator.

Don't get me started on welding... there is a reason welders have much reduced lifespans despite all the advances in safety gear... just walking around the shop exposes you to far too many toxins.

I always have a bix box of nitrile gloves (I can't have latex in my life) to protect my hands... and I still seem to wash my hands twenty times a day.
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Old 01-26-10, 11:03 AM
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Originally Posted by Sixty Fiver View Post

I use synthetic marine grease or industrial grade lubricants for bearings which costs far less than Park or Phil's which are just repackaged grease.
For grease? I just go to Wally mart and pick up a tube of



It's simple wheel bearing grease from Castrol. Works great. Use it on any metal-to-metal contact like the handlebar/stem, seat post, limit screws, braze-on screws etc. Apply using a art painting brush. Anything that is for "niche" is big profit. Maybe I should just repackage these grease and call it ACME Super-Goopy Bike Grease. Set up a fancy website with DIYs...
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Old 01-26-10, 12:33 PM
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I use auto oil when I'm too lazy to pull apart and grease. I actually like it better on a brake caliper application because I find grease attracts too much road grit. I just oil a little more frequently.
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