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Old 03-04-10, 05:57 PM   #1
TwoHeadsBrewing
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Ultegra 6700 "Shift Positions" Question

I've got a brand new bike with Ultegra 6700 shifters and derailers. I have a triple up front and of course 10 in the back.

I was having trouble working on it myself so I took my new bike into the LBS to get the derailers fine-tuned. When the owner was tuning it up he mentioned that I had two "shift positions" on both the top and bottom chainrings: one high and one low. I had never heard of this, although I'm not an experienced road rider. He explained that they were to asist in the most extreme gearing situations; outermost chainring, innermost cog and innermost chainring, outermost cog.

I did some quick searching and couldn't find any more information about this. Can someone enlighten me, or point me to a good resource?

Thanks!

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Old 03-04-10, 06:17 PM   #2
mike047
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Here;

http://bike.shimano.com/media/techdo...9830671293.pdf
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Old 03-04-10, 06:20 PM   #3
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Quote:
Originally Posted by TwoHeadsBrewing View Post
I've got a brand new bike with Ultegra 6700 shifters and derailers. I have a triple up front and of course 10 in the back.

I was having trouble working on it myself so I took my new bike into the LBS to get the derailers fine-tuned. When the owner was tuning it up he mentioned that I had two "shift positions" on both the top and bottom chainrings: one high and one low. I had never heard of this, although I'm not an experienced road rider. He explained that they were to asist in the most extreme gearing situations; outermost chainring, innermost cog and innermost chainring, outermost cog.

I did some quick searching and couldn't find any more information about this. Can someone enlighten me, or point me to a good resource?

Thanks!
It's called trim:

Read this - http://techdocs.shimano.com/media/te...9830671291.pdf
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Old 03-04-10, 06:22 PM   #4
TwoHeadsBrewing
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Nice! Thank you!
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Old 03-04-10, 06:22 PM   #5
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They're called trim positions normally, and the idea is that when the chain is being used with the little cog at front and little at the back you can trim the front derailleur to move it out a little and prevent chain rub on the front derailleur cage. With the super thin chains that come with ten speeds you don't need much trimming so the two basic positions are usually enough (normal and trimmed). Going from the large ring at front doesn't typically need trimming because the derailleur is much closer to where the chain leaves the cog so doesn't have as much chance to deviate sideways.

To trim push the large lever in but only until the first click. That will move the trim so you can keep pushing up to lower gears at the back. Note too that wide cross-chaining like this is not a recommended way to drive your gears, it's better to start thinking about shifting to the big cog at front when you reach the halfway point at the rear cassette. Going full small-small on my ten speed actually causes the chain to hit the big ring on the way past - not good.
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