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new 26" 36 spoke Rhynolite rear wheel

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new 26" 36 spoke Rhynolite rear wheel

Old 05-01-10, 05:44 AM
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LeeG
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new 26" 36 spoke Rhynolite rear wheel

I bought a new rear wheel for a new bike build-up and on cursory plucking of the spokes it appears that there are two spokes with very wrong tension. On the drive side there's a leading spoke that is at lower tension than a non-drive leading spoke 180degrees on the other side.
It's been a long time since I've built wheels but I don't recall tensions ever varying so much that a non-drive spoke could be tighter than a drive side spoke.
The only way I could imagine building a wheel that way was if the rim was bent to begin with which seems kind of unlikely as it's new. Anyway I'm going to put the wheel into the frame and re-true it.


Just curious if folks who have built wheels with Rhyno-lites ever saw a new rim that was so out of whack that it could result in such a spoke tension anomaly or if I simply got a poorly tensioned wheel.
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Old 05-01-10, 06:56 AM
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I'm thinking that youve simply got a poorly tensioned wheel.

Rhyno-lites are pretty sturdy rims. The possibility of a new one being that far out of whack is very unlikely. Also, the more spokes you have, the less lkelihood that one or two poorly tensioned spokes will affect the wheel's trueness.

If it was my wheel the first thing that I'd do would be to bring the extra-tight and extra-loose spokes to about the same tension of the rest of the spokes on that side of the wheel. Since I have one I'd use my tensiometer but you could use the spoke pluck method or however else you do it. Then I'd retrue the wheel by tightening and loosening opposing pairs of spokes by the same amount.

If that didn't look like it was going to work pretty fast, I'd start completely over by loosening every single spoke until I could see just one spoke thread. Then I'd tighten every spoke an equal amount, in small increments, until I brought the wheel back into tension. If you are starting with a rim that's straight and round you won't have very much trueing to do afterward.
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Old 05-01-10, 07:31 AM
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that makes sense, last 26" wheel I built was a Velocity Dyad 14yrs ago. I rode it for ten years with a minor blip in the rim and finally re-trued it because one spoke was making noise. This new wheel was a low labor cost internet purchase and now I know why. It looks like a nice tough rim, makes me re-think the rational behind $70-$80rims.
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Old 05-12-10, 11:27 AM
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Ok, finally got into the wheel. Guess you get what you pay for, when someone charges $25 for a wheel build when everyone else charges $35-$45 there's a reason. It was dead true and only dished off center 1.5mm, that's not too bad. The drive and non-drive sides had pink and blue spoke prep. Everything looked good until I went to even out the off tension spokes and discovered one ovalized nipple good for one 1/4 loosening turn before it was totally oval and another that was almost oval. I probably could have ignored it and everything would have been fine for years but the fact that a drive side spoke was looser than a non-drive spoke would have driven me crazy.

Last edited by LeeG; 05-12-10 at 03:14 PM.
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Old 05-12-10, 12:09 PM
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Were the spokes in question near the joint? It is not uncommon for a slight joint defect to cause "abnormal" tension behaviour with the spoke adjacent to the joint.

However, noting the stripped nipples and the use of spoke prep tells me the builder was a novice at best and may have been hiding poor tensioning skills with the spoke prep.

Believe me - the Rynolite rim is a heavy, beefy and consistent rim when it comes to tensioning toward a targetted tension range. You don't need any glues or prep with these things. I build up a about a dozen of these each year...

- Lube the nipple seats...
- True, tension and stress relieve...
- Aim for 100-110 kgf front and 110-120 kgf rear drive side...

...those suckers will keep save any accidents for years to come with a minimal maintenance schedule to boot.

=8-)

Consider backing it off - replacing the bad nipples - and having it finished again by someone more competent.

=8-)
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Old 05-12-10, 04:33 PM
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no, the two off tension spokes were 180degrees off about 4 spokes away from seam/valve hole. I've built up a fair number of wheels 20-30yrs ago just before Mavic came out with machined sidewalls and ceramic/anodized rims. I was used to malleable rims and had built a couple Velocity rims 15yrs ago that surprised me how solid they were, in other words it wasn't worth trying to get them true around the joint. But I'd never built a wheel where a non-drive side spoke was tighter than a drive side spoke so this one stuck out as anomalous. I had to lube around the spoke nipple/ferrule that was partially ovalized as I could feel the metal/metal friction between the nipple and ferrule but it stripped to totally oval as I was LOOSENING it. I'm just going to go ahead and finish it myself.
Mrabbit, for rims in this size/weight it sounds like this is the best value but I recall a Mavic rim about this size 15yrs ago that was fun to build, is there a Mavic rim of similar width/durability?
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Old 05-12-10, 06:24 PM
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Best MTB rim back then IMHO was the Mavic Oxygen M6...which of course they stopped making...



Mavic M231 and M261 were okay...and today...don't do much Mavic MTB as most customers seem to go with the Alex, Sun, Ritchey, or OEM stuff...

Most of the Mavic stuff I do today is road, hybrid and single speed stuff in 700c...

So I can't give any current Mavic recommendations experience-wise for MTB stuff...

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Disclaimer:

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2. I like anyone will comment in other areas.
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4. I will provide information as I always have to others that I believe will help them protect themselves from unscrupulous mechanics.
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Kahane, Howard. Logic and Contemporary Rhetoric: The Use of Reason in Everyday Life
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Old 05-14-10, 10:04 AM
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ok, done. Next time I'm going to build the damn thing myself or continue getting wheels from PeterWhite. It trued up nice and even with a normal distribution of tension between drive and non-drive sides. Couldn't believe having a non-drive spoke tighter than a drive side spoke could be normal. In a way it shows what a rigid wheel that rim makes when it something so anomalous wouldn't whack the wheel out. Sure couldn't do that with the road rims from 20 yrs ago I doubt an old 26" Araya 7X would allow it.
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