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What would be the best possible bike lock to have??

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What would be the best possible bike lock to have??

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Old 06-22-10, 05:46 AM
  #1  
fujiyama
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What would be the best possible bike lock to have??

I ride in a city that has a high bike theft rate. There's bike carcasses and disembodied bike limbs everywhere. It's scary!

I have a bolt on skewer for my front wheel, an allen key bolt for my seat and a cable wrapped through my seat and frame.

I' need a nice U-lock. I was looking into the Kryptonite Evolution Mini LS.

Anybody have any recommendations? And does anybody have any opinions or advice as to what their best way of locking up a bike is?

I have my way of doing it, but it's always helpful to hear others as well.

Thanks!
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Old 06-22-10, 08:00 AM
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A heavy duty U-lock or chain is adequate. You may want to supplement with a large diameter cable if you can carry the extra mass. Course no bike is safe when it is attacked by a professional thief.
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Old 06-22-10, 08:08 AM
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I have pinhead skewers on my wheels, stem, and seat along with kryptonite fuhgeddaboutit lock with New York Noose chain. I lock my bike outside all over the upper east side. I've had a couple of accessories like my bar ends and my headlight mount get taken but nothing else with the bike has been messed with. My bike was only $550 bucks it was tough swallowing the pill that was $70 skewers and $80 lock but it has been well worth it.
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Old 06-22-10, 08:31 AM
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An off-duty cop with a glock? Pricey though.... We've had excellent luck over the years with the Kryptonite product. We've sold/rented literally thousands of these to the students here, and I can count on one hand the number of bikes we've had stolen that were properly secured.
Most of these were not "properly" secured...We found a locked wheel on the bike rack or something like that. One was defeated by prying/bending.

Years ago, Bicycling magazine did a bike-lock "shootout" and the Kryptonite "New York Chain" won. However....20 pounds or so. Fine if you can leave it somewhere.
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Old 06-22-10, 08:34 AM
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Best lock? Front door lock with bicycle inside.
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Old 06-22-10, 08:52 AM
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Here's a good article from the UK Cycling Plus Magazine on good locking techniques and look at the "Related articles" column on the right for tests of different locks. http://www.bikeradar.com/mtb/gear/ar...-thieves-14025 The Abus Granit X Plus/54 and Kryptonites came out pretty good plus the Kryptonites are US made. But as mentioned, most decent Ulocks and heavy duty chains will put off most of the theives. The most important thing is to lock it properly and in places that make the thief feel taking the bike would be risky for them.
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Old 06-22-10, 01:02 PM
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Sheldon Brown always has good advice -- specifically about using as small of a U-lock as possible and where to position (rear wheel/tire to post in rear triangle, no need to loop thru frame...)

http://www.sheldonbrown.com/lock-strategy.html
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Old 06-22-10, 01:29 PM
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Originally Posted by Crankycrank View Post
plus the Kryptonites are US made.
So the ones I get in at my shop I suppose just the packaging is made in China? Either way, go for an evolution (orange) kryptonite. That will stop all but professional theives, and you can't stop professional thieves with a lock.
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Old 06-23-10, 11:47 AM
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Best preventative (short of commuting by car), is to use a bike so crappy no one wants it.
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Old 06-23-10, 06:54 PM
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and use more locks than the bike next to yours.
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Old 06-23-10, 09:48 PM
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Regarding components and accessories, especially seatpost and clamp bolts, handlebar bolts, etc., I've had an idea and I'm surprised no one else has thought of it (or maybe they have and decided it was a bad idea). What about dripping hot candle wax in the allen heads until they fill up? For infrequently loosened allen heads I think this might discourage a thief from using an allen wrench to take your Brooks saddle or your handlebars.
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Old 06-23-10, 09:51 PM
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Oh... I use non-quick release skewers and the Sheldon Brown lock strategy when I cannot bring my bike inside. I keep my bikes inside my apartment and in my office at work. I have OnGuard Pitbull u-locks... I have a Brute but the thing is really too heavy to carry around, it's heavier than my friend's Kryptonite NY.
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Old 06-23-10, 10:17 PM
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Originally Posted by vautrain View Post
Regarding components and accessories, especially seatpost and clamp bolts, handlebar bolts, etc., I've had an idea and I'm surprised no one else has thought of it (or maybe they have and decided it was a bad idea). What about dripping hot candle wax in the allen heads until they fill up? For infrequently loosened allen heads I think this might discourage a thief from using an allen wrench to take your Brooks saddle or your handlebars.
How fast can you remove the wax using a sharp object?
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Old 06-24-10, 12:02 AM
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Originally Posted by fujiyama View Post
I have a bolt on skewer for my front wheel, an allen key bolt for my seat and a cable wrapped through my seat and frame.
That's good to prevent your wheel and seat from easily walking away. But, even moderately serious thieves will have a crescent wrench and allen key.

You probably already know this, but if your environment is really risky it would be better to use a quick-release front wheel. Remove it, place it parallel with the rear wheel, and u-lock it all together. Use a quick-release seat and take it with you (including the QR mechanism).

If you can't switch to a QR front wheel, use a 4' cable to "noose" your front wheel to your u-lock. And, use a QR seatpost clamp. Remove the seat and thread it onto that 4' cable.

Regarding the Evolution LS: The long-shank U-Lock gives the attacker more surface area to use a hydraulic jack to bust the lock. From what I've seen, people with mopeds use the longer-shank u-locks.

4" by 9" is a better choice for a bicycle. But, the "mini" (3x5) is more secure because it doesn't expose as much shank to an attacker. (However, it may not be long enough to lock the front wheel to the rear wheel, and everything to a post.).

I have the Evolution 4x9. If I had to do it over again, I'd buy the New York Std (4x8).

The OnGaurd locks look like a better value. Thicker shanks for the money. But, I don't know how they compare to Kryptonite overall (body strength, lock strength, shank hardness).

I approach security in layers. If I just step into a quick-trip store for 2-5 minutes, I'll use a 3/8" combination cable lock. If I go somewhere I trust (where the bike rack is visible, where employees take their breaks, etc.) I just use the Kryptonite Series 2 and the noose to the front wheel (and a thin leash to the seat). If I go somewhere I distrust, I'll use both u-locks, remove the front wheel and lock it with the rear (using both u-locks), and take the seat with me.

I also try to lock my bike near bikes that are improperly locked (u-locked front wheel to the bike rack; or only using a cable combination lock; or a chain from the hardware store). A thief might find that more appealing.
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Old 06-24-10, 04:56 AM
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Originally Posted by vautrain View Post
Regarding components and accessories, especially seatpost and clamp bolts, handlebar bolts, etc., I've had an idea and I'm surprised no one else has thought of it (or maybe they have and decided it was a bad idea). What about dripping hot candle wax in the allen heads until they fill up? For infrequently loosened allen heads I think this might discourage a thief from using an allen wrench to take your Brooks saddle or your handlebars.
The oldest trick to tamper-proof Inbus bolts (allen bolts for some) is to superglue a ball bearing into the head of the screw.
In case of wanting to loosen it, the ball bearing can be removed with acetone (dissolving the superglue methacrylate) and with a magnet lift the ball (or with the help of a needle to help lifting the ball)

Also bolts can be filled up with epoxy (it will come of, but really slow and painful, best to use for screws never to be loosen in the next few years.

More solutions here: http://www.bikehacks.com/bikehacks/2...art-theft.html

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Old 06-24-10, 05:09 AM
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What is the best light weight lock?

I use a cheap bike and just stop to pick things up at the store.
I don't want to carry a super lock that weighs as much as my bike I just want the best lock relative to its weight.
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Old 06-24-10, 05:18 AM
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If you lock it in the same place for school/work then get a big nice heavy chain/U and leave them to the rack where you park your bike. For the rest of the time a folding lock should work:

Try avoiding cable locks
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Old 06-24-10, 06:49 AM
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Originally Posted by furballi View Post
How fast can you remove the wax using a sharp object?
Depends on the wax, but sealing wax would be difficult enough to discourage a thief, I think (think more plastic-y). The ball bearing or epoxy tricks are undoubtedly more secure.
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Old 06-24-10, 07:12 AM
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Originally Posted by Asi View Post
If you lock it in the same place for school/work then get a big nice heavy chain/U and leave them to the rack where you park your bike. For the rest of the time a folding lock should work:

Try avoiding cable locks
This look interesting I tried find a folding lock but the $80 price seemed very high. ttp://clevercycles.com/p/?prod-code=ABUS+Bordo+6100%2F75+folding+lock%2C+combination#ABUS-Bordo-6100-75-folding-lock--combination
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Old 06-24-10, 08:46 AM
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There are no 15 pound bikes just 15 pound bikes with a 10 pound lock.
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Old 06-24-10, 10:51 AM
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I got a Bike with a mount on the inside of the chainstays, for a Ring lock made by the Dutch AXA company. It locks up the rear wheel to keep it from getting rolled away.
I wanted their additional plug in lockup chain, so had to update to the current model , got Both from Clever Cycles in Portland, chain gets wrapped around the seatpost, until needed , then I wrap it around the front wheel and a fixed object and it plugs into the frame mounted ring lock on the side opposite the key.

so It's got both wheels secured and the chain around a fixed object..

Parts stripping {I've had parts removed, in the time it took just taking a piss, in CPH**
is where a folding bike wins, You Bring it inside with you.
My most recent purchase: a Used Brompton., and a On Guard armored cable lock, the cable is inside a steel segmented sleeve.
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