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Proprietary sizes? 1990ish Gary Fisher Hoo Koo...

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Proprietary sizes? 1990ish Gary Fisher Hoo Koo...

Old 08-17-10, 08:43 AM
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Proprietary sizes? 1990ish Gary Fisher Hoo Koo...

didn't know where else to post and ask..... I have a 1990ish GF hookoooeeekooo. None of my dozens of seatposts fit... most too small, only one too big. I don't have calipers nor do I know the diameters of my posts. Found, surprised, that the quill stem is a 1-1/4". Wondering if they used a funny seatpost size also. Anyone out there have the knowledge. Thanks,
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Old 08-17-10, 09:58 AM
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It's about making a tube larger in diameter so it is stronger in resisting bending forces..

In the case of seatposts, You can fit a shim with the Outside diameter
matching the inside diameter of your oversize seat tube

and the inside diameter of the seatpost you have

one source may be a cane creek shim as they make a suspension seatpost in 27.2,

then supply a number of shims , nicely machined.

British USE is another source, they also make a suspension seat-post, 2 sizes
in 25.0 for up to 27.2 there are machined shims..
and there are another series with a 27.2 ID and a series of different OD's above that

First I owned an AlAn frame with a 25.0 seat post, so the shim set came in handy
to re use the seatpost, later in a steel frame..
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Old 08-17-10, 10:01 AM
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Oh and there are conversion reducer shims for headsets too

1.125" down from 1.25".. and quill to threadless conversion parts for stems..

QBP a source for those , Most shops have a QBP account.

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Old 08-17-10, 10:09 AM
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Since you don't own calipers, I suggest buying some calipers. A basic set is a lot less expensive than buying an extra seatpost in the wrong size.

As for your question regarding 'funny' seatpost sizes, YES, it is very likely they used an odd size, but a lot of brands have seatpost sizes rarely used on other bikes. Seatposts come in many many sizes, usually in increments of 0.2mm. For example, a 27.0mm post will not fit properly in a frame designed for 26.8mm or 27.2mm. You need to have the 'correct' size, and all these sizes are available in inexpensive posts that can be ordered through your LBS.
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Old 08-17-10, 10:14 AM
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Seat posts usually come in sizes .2mm diameter apart so there are dozens of seat post diameters available as well as many shims to adapt smaller seat posts to larger seat tubes. Best bet is to head to the LBS and have them measure it or break down and buy a set of calipers.
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Old 08-17-10, 10:24 AM
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Many bike shops may/should have a go/no-go stepped taper seat post measuring tool,
it is stepped in 0.2mm increments

it fits inside the frame up to where it won't fit, the last step that fits,
is your seat post diameter..
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Old 08-17-10, 12:26 PM
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Usually the seatpost has a stamped size on the lower section once you remove it.
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Old 08-17-10, 12:57 PM
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as odd as it seems I acutally have a '90 Fisher catalog, odder still it it list the seatpost diameters. the '90 HK II is either white with blue graphics or green/silver speckle and Deore LX parts. the seatpost listed is 28.6 ( looked three times!) others that year were 31.6

I had one of these and traded for Campi equipped Cdale. after the fiorst ride on the Cdale I really missed the fisher
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Old 08-17-10, 02:17 PM
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Originally Posted by LarDasse74 View Post
Since you don't own calipers, I suggest buying some calipers. A basic set is a lot less expensive than buying an extra seatpost in the wrong size.
+1 Buy a digital caliper. I picked one up at Harbor Freight for $10. That is a lot cheaper than buying seat posts that are the wrong size, and risking damage to your bike. (edit: mistyped micrometer, meant caliper).

+1 Seat posts usually come in 0.2mm size increments. And you have to get the right size (if a bike is sized for a 27.2mm seat post, then a 27.0 and a 27.4 will not work). So there are a LOT of different sizes.

Last edited by wrk101; 08-17-10 at 06:51 PM.
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Old 08-17-10, 04:13 PM
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For casual bicycle stuff I'd suggest a digital or dial caliper over a micrometer just because it has jaws for measuring both inside and outside stuff. The digital calipers are cheap these days but I find that I seem to end up with dead batteries all to often. For this reason I prefer the only slightly harder to read dial calipers. The only issue is that they don't convert back and forth from metric to Imperial so you need to buy a metric AND an imperial set.
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Old 08-17-10, 04:27 PM
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Originally Posted by BCRider View Post
For casual bicycle stuff I'd suggest a digital or dial caliper over a micrometer just because it has jaws for measuring both inside and outside stuff.
The other problem with the most common micrometers is that they are limited to 1"/25 mm maximum and only specialty micrometers measure larger diameters and then only 1" to 2" or 25 mm to 50mm, etc.

If the battery life isn't an issue, most digital calipers convert from Imperial measurement to metric at the push of a button.
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Old 08-17-10, 05:59 PM
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Measure the OD of the tube , 6" ruler in engraved in 64ths should do, across the open end,
then measure wall thickness of the tube with the caliper

double that, then subtract it from the OD , and that should be the ID..
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Old 08-17-10, 09:40 PM
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calipers are great but having a pair of these Stein seat post guages makes you a real C&V Geekette

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