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-   -   new wheels for 96mm front dropouts (https://www.bikeforums.net/bicycle-mechanics/673081-new-wheels-96mm-front-dropouts.html)

sprintTO 08-19-10 01:53 PM

new wheels for 96mm front dropouts
 
Hi Everyone,

I recently bought a new wheel to replace my old 27" rims for my early '80s record. The new wheel is 700, and all seemed normal until I tried to install it.

Ends up the hub for my wheel is 100mm, but my fork width is 96mm. I sort of assumed that all hubs were 100mm (durh..). I noticed that the only preventing installation is the lock nuts. Is it possible to get thinner lock nuts or do they come in a standard size?

I want to avoid cold setting the frame at all possible costs.

thanks for you help,

STO

lord_athlon 08-19-10 02:13 PM

why not spring the fork all of 2mm on either side.

lverhagen 08-19-10 04:36 PM

Yes, I believe it is possible to find thin locknuts, however 2mm thinner is a fair amount when compared to the thickness of most locknuts that I have seen. What is your opposition to cold setting the fork? This is by far the best solution.

Cheers

fietsbob 08-19-10 04:42 PM

Bike shop has a reference jig to get the legs symmetrical , You need to remove the fork from the bike, though.

mrrabbit 08-20-10 01:53 AM

Just put the wheel in and ride...

...or are you Charles Atlas pre-weight training?

=8-)

sprintTO 08-21-10 08:21 AM

Does anyone know of a good site to look into cold setting a fork? I'm not really familiar to the concept other than "you bend stuff".

Also, what does it mean "to spring"

Ingleside 08-21-10 10:36 AM


Originally Posted by sprintTO (Post 11327666)

Also, what does it mean "to spring"

To install the wheel in your fork slightly spread the fork legs a bit and slide the wheel in to the dropouts. The fork should flex enough to allow you to put the wheel in. You wouldn't be harming anything. It just makes removing and installing the wheel a little harder since you have deal with spreading the fork every time you do so. Thats why people get their forks or frames cold set so wheels slide in with less resistance.

Spasticteapot 08-21-10 10:39 AM

Pay to have your LBS do it. It shouldn't cost much.

lord_athlon 08-21-10 11:00 AM

I just sprung the legs on my old sports.

fietsbob 08-21-10 12:01 PM

"spring" as I interpret it, means you force the wheel in, each time you put it in,
OTOH 'cold setting' means that you have the blades carefully bent outward to have the right spacing,
so wheels go back in with less struggle..

your pick ..

Deanster04 08-21-10 04:37 PM


Originally Posted by fietsbob (Post 11319074)
Bike shop has a reference jig to get the legs symmetrical , You need to remove the fork from the bike, though.

+1
Make the forks right with the proper tool. If you try and do it your self you will probably not have a properly aligned fork. You won't notice it until you try and ride with no hands. The mechanic can check to make sure the forks aren't out of alignment fore n aft as well. Take it to a qualified LBS.

jorglueke 09-20-16 10:21 PM

Related but different than the OP question is are there 700 wheels made now that are 96mm?

Bill Kapaun 09-20-16 10:46 PM


Originally Posted by jorglueke (Post 19070660)
Related but different than the OP question is are there 700 wheels made now that are 96mm?

You probably won't find them as such, but many hubs use 2MM spacers, such as the HB-290. (I've built a set of 27" wheels with a 96mm front)
I have an HB-4600 in hand that appears to have 2mm spacers as well.
You'd have to remove the spacers and shorten the axle 4 mm if QR.

jorglueke 09-20-16 10:50 PM


Originally Posted by Bill Kapaun (Post 19070694)
You probably won't find them as such, but many hubs use 2MM spacers, such as the HB-290. (I've built a set of 27" wheels with a 96mm front)
I have an HB-4600 in hand that appears to have 2mm spacers as well.
You'd have to remove the spacers and shorten the axle 4 mm if QR.

Thanks. Knowing me I'll probably just squeeze in a 100mm, steel bends a little.

Bill Kapaun 09-20-16 10:56 PM


Originally Posted by jorglueke (Post 19070701)
Thanks. Knowing me I'll probably just squeeze in a 100mm, steel bends a little.

Good luck with that.

randomgear 09-21-16 12:51 AM

Assuming that you have a steel, you can make a tool to spread your fork blades very easily by using a piece of threaded rod probably at least 6" long and putting two washers and thread two nuts onto it. Place between the fork dropouts and wrench them apart to spread the dropouts father apart. Go slowly by trial and error and try not to over spread. If you overspread slightly, use a C-Clamp or other such device to push them together.

If you have an aluminum fork, don't cold set it. Just spread them apart as you mount the wheel.

jorglueke 09-21-16 08:41 AM

Thanks, it's definitely steel. Old, French steel. It's good to have options, that makes two, three if you count happening upon an old French front rim.

FBinNY 09-21-16 08:58 AM

FWIW - I suspect that your fork was designed as a 96mm that used the tension caused by spreading to hold the wheel in the event the nuts or QR were loose. The original hubs were also 100mm, and the locknut faces had a small inner lip that stuck out about 1/16".

If you look closely, you might see that the slot isn't a simple U, but more like a keyhole. The axle slides into the slot and the fork is sprung so the lips in the face latch in the wider area.

This design was implemented to meet the CPSC requirement for secondary retention in the event the nuts were loose.

Obviously, you lose this retention feature with a new wheel, but by the same token, little effort is needed to spring the fork open to mount a 100mm wheel.

I point this out to let you know that there's no need to pay someone to spread your fork. Of course you may if you prefer, or can do it yourself, but it isn't necessary.

fietsbob 09-21-16 09:18 AM

100 is the standard* , but damage can happen .

* Folding bikes use 74 wide, for compact fold and because the wheel is smaller (16")

FBinNY 09-21-16 09:24 AM


Originally Posted by fietsbob (Post 19071387)
100 is the standard* , but damage can happen ....

It doesn't have to be damage. 96mm forks were standard on Raleigh built bikes intended for the US market, during a period extending from the late sixties through the mid seventies.

Read the post immediately above for more details.

fietsbob 09-21-16 09:35 AM

OK my market survey is more limited than yours .. 'early 80's record' is not indicating a Brand and model to my reading ..

So It may be an Older Bike than 80s as the OP thought.





...

jorglueke 09-21-16 09:40 AM

This is a '72 Motobecane. Based on the Fabrique en France and the components it was probably built for the European market. The model is a bit of guesswork, I think probably the second lowest of 5 in the course series. The form moves a little with moderate pressure, probably enough to accommodate a 100mm hub.

Bill Kapaun 09-21-16 09:54 AM


Originally Posted by FBinNY (Post 19071402)
It doesn't have to be damage. 96mm forks were standard on Raleigh built bikes intended for the US market, during a period extending from the late sixties through the mid seventies.

Read the post immediately above for more details.

The bike I dealt with was an early 70's Takara road bike. (probably about1973?)
Even though the forks appeared rather spindly, there was no way I could force a 100mm hub into them without EXTREME effort.

SkyDog75 09-21-16 10:06 AM

For whatever it's worth, I use a 100 mm hub on my '72 or '73 Peugeot UO-8. It doesn't take much effort at all to spread the fork enough to install the wheel.

FBinNY 09-21-16 10:21 AM


Originally Posted by Bill Kapaun (Post 19071496)
The bike I dealt with was an early 70's Takara road bike. (probably about1973?)
Even though the forks appeared rather spindly, there was no way I could force a 100mm hub into them without EXTREME effort.

My reference to designed 96mm forks was limited to Raleigh built bikes of a certain era. These forks are clearly recognizable by the 5/16" keyhole slot that opens to a 7/16 round. (both dimensions are approx.)


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