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"converting a conversion", or "single chainring guide"

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"converting a conversion", or "single chainring guide"

Old 09-01-10, 12:35 PM
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"converting a conversion", or "single chainring guide"

I converted my panasonic touring delux to a fixed gear commuter for the summer. Now that I'm bored with that, I'm thinking I'd like to add back the rear cluster, but keep the front at a single chainring.

I'm not sure if I'll need it, but are there any products this group could suggest to keep the chain on the chainring when the back end of things is shifting left and right? (I worry that the 'crosschain' effect will cause derailling.)

Alternately, effective search strategies to look in the archives would also be appreciated. I didn't find anything.

Thanks,
Neil

PS. I know I could just put the front derailleur back on, but I think it would look odd.
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Old 09-01-10, 12:49 PM
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Used to be plenty of 5/6 speed bikes that came with single chainwheels w/o any special arrangements, and they didn't seem to suffer unduly from chains coming off. Aim for a chainline somewhere in the middle of the cassette and see how it goes.
If it becomes an issue the DH MTB segment of the market has plenty of chain retaining devices.
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Old 09-01-10, 01:02 PM
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Originally Posted by dabac
Used to be plenty of 5/6 speed bikes that came with single chainwheels w/o any special arrangements, and they didn't seem to suffer unduly from chains coming off. Aim for a chainline somewhere in the middle of the cassette and see how it goes.
If it becomes an issue the DH MTB segment of the market has plenty of chain retaining devices.
Thanks, I thought this might be the case, so I plan on trying nothing first, and going from there.

As for the DH stuff: it looks effective, but perhaps overkill for my commute. Any light-duty solutions? Something DIY perhaps?


Neil
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Old 09-01-10, 01:10 PM
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Chainring on the Middle , 'chain minder' on the seat tube keeps the chain from coming off on the inside
its a finger that almost touches the chain..
and a toothless chain guard ring would replace the outer chain ring , also keep the chain put, on the chainring + keep your pants cleaner.
DIY have a used chainring big enough to take the teeth off?

It's a Cyclocross single ring solution.
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Old 09-01-10, 01:31 PM
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Originally Posted by fietsbob
Chainring on the Middle , 'chain minder' on the seat tube keeps the chain from coming off on the inside
its a finger that almost touches the chain..
and a toothless chain guard ring would replace the outer chain ring , also keep the chain put, on the chainring + keep your pants cleaner.
DIY have a used chainring big enough to take the teeth off?

It's a Cyclocross single ring solution.
Neat idea, thanks.
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Old 09-01-10, 04:51 PM
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Just install whichever ring you want onto the inside of the spider so it lines up near the center of the rear cassete or cluster. It'll be fine with no need for anything else. Lots of us have been running such a setup for years with no issues. I've got a 7x1 setup like this on an errand bike that I don't think has ever thrown the chain in a decade of riding. Or if it has it's so infrequent that I sure don't remember it happening.
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Old 09-01-10, 05:48 PM
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Originally Posted by engo
Thanks, I thought this might be the case, so I plan on trying nothing first, and going from there.

As for the DH stuff: it looks effective, but perhaps overkill for my commute. Any light-duty solutions? Something DIY perhaps?


Neil
If you're into projects and the fun and experience that comes with conversions, this is an ideal opportunity to try out an internal gear hub. You can keep your fixed gear chainline, while gaining multiple speeds. It's worth a look.
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Old 09-01-10, 07:35 PM
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A cheap, light and simple chain guide would be a front derailleur with no cable attachment and centered over the chainring by the inner limit screw.
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Old 09-01-10, 08:38 PM
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Originally Posted by vredstein
If you're into projects and the fun and experience that comes with conversions, this is an ideal opportunity to try out an internal gear hub. You can keep your fixed gear chainline, while gaining multiple speeds. It's worth a look.
IGH are a great option, but they can be rather pricey, especially considering 7 speed cassette hubs are practically free. There is a good chance you won't need any chain retention, but then again, derailments can be a real bother. I suggest building it up first, and if the bike even looks like it might throw a chain, adding some kind of protection.

Salsa Crossing Guards are a great way to do it, or the DIY version of taking a chainring to a grinding wheel. You can run two of them, or one on the outside, and a Third Eye Chain Watcher on the inside. There's actually a better version of the chain watcher, but it's name escapes me at the moment.

Bear in mind, all of those might be superfluous, you might throw chains, you might not. I'd guess that using a single speed chainring, without ramps, pins or shaped teeth would probably help.

Even if you don't throw a single chain, a cross style guard on the outside will keep your pants from getting caught in the chain too much. Not a full chainguard by any means, but it does help a bit.
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Old 09-01-10, 09:00 PM
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I rode a C-dale hybrid for several years as a 7- and then an 8-speed and dumped the chain off the ring occasionally. That was using a plain chainring with no FD or other devices. It was a minor annoyance.
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Old 09-01-10, 09:20 PM
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Originally Posted by fuzz2050
IGH are a great option, but they can be rather pricey, especially considering 7 speed cassette hubs are practically free. There is a good chance you won't need any chain retention, but then again, derailments can be a real bother. I suggest building it up first, and if the bike even looks like it might throw a chain, adding some kind of protection.

Salsa Crossing Guards are a great way to do it, or the DIY version of taking a chainring to a grinding wheel. You can run two of them, or one on the outside, and a Third Eye Chain Watcher on the inside. There's actually a better version of the chain watcher, but it's name escapes me at the moment.

Bear in mind, all of those might be superfluous, you might throw chains, you might not. I'd guess that using a single speed chainring, without ramps, pins or shaped teeth would probably help.

Even if you don't throw a single chain, a cross style guard on the outside will keep your pants from getting caught in the chain too much. Not a full chainguard by any means, but it does help a bit.
After 15 months and 3400 miles, I haven't thrown a chain yet. I did recently notice my chain had quite a bit of slack and solved that by replacing the 20t rear cog with a 21t. I also have the option of using an Izumi half link. I think using 1/8" chain, cog and ring also significantly reduces the chances. Seems like I read a lot from people who look into getting an IGH and start fretting about finding a special frame with horizontal dropouts or ECC bottom brackets when the solution can be so much simpler and cheaper.
If I rode with long pants, I'd probably use a leg band. Flapping cuffs would be annoying.
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Old 09-02-10, 08:25 AM
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Originally Posted by fuzz2050
There's actually a better version of the chain watcher, but it's name escapes me at the moment.
It's the N-Gear Jump Stop and yes, it works very well and seems to be a bit more effective than the Third Eye version. https://n-gear.com/
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Old 09-02-10, 09:26 AM
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Thanks all.
Yes, the internally geared hub would be cool, but it would mean new spokes/new wheel, and a bucket of money. I already have a wheel, and I'll probably just thread on a 6 or 7 speed freewheel. The Jump stop looks interesting. If I start derailling on the inside, I'll get something like this for sure. As for the outer guard; does the modified chainring need to have a larger finished diameter than the one driving the chain? I found one that is the same tooth count, but san-teeth, it will sit below the chain.... will this be ineffective?
PS. I know the derailleur would be easiest. I like to do things the hard way! : )
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Old 09-02-10, 09:43 AM
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You need to find one with 6 or so more teeth, worn out large MTB chainrinf a 46 with a 40 t middle a good pick..
It needs to have a finished diameter as large as the chain on the chainrings, slightly larger than the tips of the teeth.

Or Larger..

You can buy finished ones , too.. OTOH, Bash guards are thicker for riding over fallen trees .. different things.
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Old 09-02-10, 11:49 AM
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cool, thanks!

Neil
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Old 09-02-10, 11:56 AM
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All it took for me when I went from 3x8 to 1x8 was getting the chain the right length. I just removed a link at a time 'til it was tensioned enough in all gears not to jump ship.

Another solution to consider if your chain jumps is to get a single speed specific chainring. They usually have higher profile teeth that tend to hold onto the chain better.
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