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Exploding Shimano Hyperglide chains

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Exploding Shimano Hyperglide chains

Old 01-27-11, 04:05 PM
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The OP probably needs Yaban's non-index "Derailleur Chain" (as marked on box). Or just look up the equivalent for KMC.

Usually sell for about 8.00 bucks at an LBS.

Just my guess...

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Old 01-27-11, 07:14 PM
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I will have to go back to the store and look at the box, I don't remember seeing the three speeds listed. I don't remember if it came with extra pins, it definitely did not come with a master link.

I used to buy those pins to separate my mountain bike chain, yes, you insert then break the excess tab off. I am familiar with that as well.

The funny thing is I watched a certified mechanic do the re-insertion method to clean a guys' chain in the parts washer , WTF.
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Old 01-27-11, 07:15 PM
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don't go back to that mechanic. I try not to even reinsert pins for single speed chains.
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Old 01-27-11, 07:26 PM
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Originally Posted by shelbyfv
I've never broken a chain but I like SRAM for price and the removable link. Don't see Sedis or YKK anywhere, is that C&V ?
Is Sedis C&V??!....You betcha! It was considered by most to be the best shifting chain in the 70's and 80's, specially the regular "Sedisport" model.
I only run Sedis chains on my bikes even today (Sedis SL), I love them so much! I suspect they're heavier than most modern chains but I wouldn't go to any of the newer ones or other brands anytime soon!
By the way, SRAM is the decendant of the Sedis brand. The brand went to Sachs then became SRAM.

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Old 01-27-11, 07:32 PM
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Originally Posted by joejack951
From what I can tell, Shimano does not currently offer any 6/7 speed chains. They only offer 6/7/8 speed chains and by virtue of including 8 speed in the description the chain must be a flush rivet chain. As has been mentioned already, you CANNOT break and rejoin a flush rivet chain using the same pin. You must use the special Shimano joining pin and then never remove that pin again (or discard the links it was used in).

I've also never broken a chain. I've used Shimano, SRAM, and KMC chains in 8, 9, and 10 speed variants.

Ok this is cool, now we're finally getting somewhere. I did wonder about this awhile ago. I think shimano should include a couple extra pins in the box, I mean jeez for 24.99 I think that would be fair. I would assume therefore it has to do with the taper of the pin going through the outside of the plate.

The Shimano nickel plated chain (IC 51 or whatever it is, too lazy to get up and look) definitely looks a lot stronger though, the plates are much better. I wonder if that's case hardened steel. etc. I'll check at the shop for the pins and talk to the kid again. What master link gets the nod these days? I will check that out if it looks solid. I know SRAM has one, but is there an aftermarket link that really rocks?
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Old 01-27-11, 07:41 PM
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I saw an awesome slide show at this same shop where the manager did a tour of some of the Tour De France stages for a week. He's not a heavy guy, and was riding a hyper-light and way expensive Look carbon fiber with 30 speeds or whatever ridiculous amount they're into now.

His chain broke climbing the Tourmalet. The bike was brand new.

I'm not trying to fear monger here, this is no BS

I highly doubt he would re-pin his chains the old way. he's pretty anal.
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Old 01-27-11, 07:43 PM
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Originally Posted by IknowURider
Ok this is cool, now we're finally getting somewhere. I did wonder about this awhile ago. I think shimano should include a couple extra pins in the box, I mean jeez for 24.99 I think that would be fair. I would assume therefore it has to do with the taper of the pin going through the outside of the plate.
The Shimano chains I've bought have come with joining pins. They are also available separately for a few bucks. The pins have special features that allow them to grip the plates versus requiring a peening operation.

Originally Posted by IknowURider
The Shimano nickel plated chain (IC 51 or whatever it is, too lazy to get up and look) definitely looks a lot stronger though, the plates are much better. I wonder if that's case hardened steel. etc. I'll check at the shop for the pins and talk to the kid again. What master link gets the nod these days? I will check that out if it looks solid. I know SRAM has one, but is there an aftermarket link that really rocks?
You don't need a stronger chain. Trust the comments you've received so far. With a properly joined chain, chances of chain failure are slim to none barring manufacturing defects. Unless you are seeing pins shearing or plates cracking, chain strength is not your issue.

I've used SRAM, KMC, and Wipperman master links with no issues. All open and close quite easily for chain cleaning. The Wipperman is the easiest to install and remove but it also requires a specific orientation (not hard to memorize how it should be installed though).
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Old 01-27-11, 07:58 PM
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Originally Posted by joejack951
From what I can tell, Shimano does not currently offer any 6/7 speed chains. They only offer 6/7/8 speed chains and by virtue of including 8 speed in the description the chain must be a flush rivet chain. As has been mentioned already, you CANNOT break and rejoin a flush rivet chain using the same pin. You must use the special Shimano joining pin and then never remove that pin again (or discard the links it was used in).

I've also never broken a chain. I've used Shimano, SRAM, and KMC chains in 8, 9, and 10 speed variants.
Wait a sec, I just realized something, the special joining pin is usually black in color, correct? This should be how you would know not to mess with it. jeez, it would be nice if the guy took two seconds to tell you "remember don't remove that pin again, it has to stay put". That would be good customer service.
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Old 01-27-11, 08:11 PM
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Originally Posted by joejack951
The Shimano chains I've bought have come with joining pins. They are also available separately for a few bucks. The pins have special features that allow them to grip the plates versus requiring a peening operation.



You don't need a stronger chain. Trust the comments you've received so far. With a properly joined chain, chances of chain failure are slim to none barring manufacturing defects. Unless you are seeing pins shearing or plates cracking, chain strength is not your issue.

I've used SRAM, KMC, and Wipperman master links with no issues. All open and close quite easily for chain cleaning. The Wipperman is the easiest to install and remove but it also requires a specific orientation (not hard to memorize how it should be installed though).
That's cool, I appreciate the help. I read Sheldon's page on "Rivetless" a few years ago, and I think I understand why a special re-pin would be necessary. It's funny , I used those pins on my old Trek 930 chain and it's been fine ( it's not marked with any logos) . But I got misled by that new mechanic. The wierd thing is you can't see the damage on close inspection, and I tested the link by flexing it before riding. It seemed to hold perfectly. The plates were never bent in the reinsertion.
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Old 01-27-11, 08:12 PM
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Originally Posted by IknowURider
Wait a sec, I just realized something, the special joining pin is usually black in color, correct? This should be how you would know not to mess with it. jeez, it would be nice if the guy took two seconds to tell you "remember don't remove that pin again, it has to stay put". That would be good customer service.
Yes, the pin is black and also has a circular divot on the end. The peened pins look quite different on the end (no picture handy unfortunately). And I agree that it would be good customer service to explain these things but I'm guessing that most shops simply assume customers will bring their bikes in for service versus attempting any fixes themselves. Otherwise, you might expect them, or the owner's manual, to explain simple things like chain replacement, derailler adjustment, or simple wheel truing.
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Old 01-27-11, 08:20 PM
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Originally Posted by IknowURider
That's cool, I appreciate the help. I read Sheldon's page on "Rivetless" a few years ago, and I think I understand why a special re-pin would be necessary. It's funny , I used those pins on my old Trek 930 chain and it's been fine ( it's not marked with any logos) . But I got misled by that new mechanic. The wierd thing is you can't see the damage on close inspection, and I tested the link by flexing it before riding. It seemed to hold perfectly. The plates were never bent in the reinsertion.
It's not a matter of bending the plates. Peened pins are first pressed into the hole in the plate then the end of the pin is deformed to capture it in the plate. When the pin is then pressed out, the capture mechanism is destroyed. The hole is the plate becomes oversized as the enlarged pin end is forced through it. Once reinserted, it's now only held it place by a compromised press fit versus a proper press fit and peening. That chains reassembled as such hold up to any tension is pretty amazing to me.
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Old 01-27-11, 08:53 PM
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A couple thoughts...

When a Shimano chain comes out of the Shimano chain making factory, there is at least one spare replacement pin in the box, as well as a half-inserted black pin meant to be used for the initial installation.

When I was first working in a shop as a teenager I installed the chain on my own bike without using the special pin and the chain broke a few miles later. Then I 'repaired' the chain without using a new pin and it broke again after few miles. Repair/break/repair/break. I think I eventually replaced the chain with a Sachs-Sedis because I figured Shimano chains were crap. I will always remember my Summer of Broken Chains (1992) but I don't remember when I finally figured out what I had done wrong.
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Old 01-27-11, 09:46 PM
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Originally Posted by IknowURider
1) No
2)No
3) No
You're funny
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Old 01-27-11, 09:47 PM
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Originally Posted by LarDasse74
A couple thoughts...

When a Shimano chain comes out of the Shimano chain making factory, there is at least one spare replacement pin in the box, as well as a half-inserted black pin meant to be used for the initial installation.

When I was first working in a shop as a teenager I installed the chain on my own bike without using the special pin and the chain broke a few miles later. Then I 'repaired' the chain without using a new pin and it broke again after few miles. Repair/break/repair/break. I think I eventually replaced the chain with a Sachs-Sedis because I figured Shimano chains were crap. I will always remember my Summer of Broken Chains (1992) but I don't remember when I finally figured out what I had done wrong.
No modern 9 or 10 speed shimano chain comes with pin preinstalled, you only get those OEM, as in with bikes or some other gray market. All others come with 1 or 2 pins in the box, seperate.
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Old 01-27-11, 10:53 PM
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Originally Posted by Mr IGH
Nothing ruins a chain quicker or more certainly than removing the factory lube and oiling it with some home-brewed crap. Links start sticking/siezing, next thing ya know, the chain breaks. I pity the silly fools who think they know more than SRAM/Shimano, OTOH, it is kinda funny they spend time/effort/chemicals to ruin a new chain, takes all kinds
Eventually that factory lube is contaminated with micro-grit and becomes like a toothpaste wearing out the chain.

Originally Posted by operator
Chains fail because of

1) Shifting under extreme load
2) Installation of install pin fail
3) Extreme wear

Trust me, you ain't breaking no chains if hushovd ain't. Manufacturing defects are similarly rare.
Yes
Yes
Yes

Of the chains that have exploded one on me many of them were cause by these issues. #2 is far less common now with a power-link. #3 always gets me in the winter.
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